Skip to main content

A Response — Why #TeamNatural is for Everyone, Not Just Black Women

Avatar • Jul 3, 2014

website_image_for_Curls[1]

BGLH writer Jc presents a different point of view about who deserves to be represented in the natural hair movement. Check it out;

Show of hands — Do you agree and advocate that there should be spaces reserved for black people to discuss thoughts and ideas central to our culture and that these spaces should be to the exclusion of other races? Yes, no, maybe? Now, substitute the word black with white in that first sentence and read it again, seriously do it now! Do you realise that we are discussing apartheid? If you believe that the principles of apartheid were racist, then when black people do it, it is also racist.

Now let me explain to why it is that I believe that we as the natural community should be inclusive and not exclusive:

1. We are individuals not a collective, a white girl could relate to your experience
It is absolutely not true that every black woman can identify with a journey to self love, some of us can’t. Some of us actually grew up being told that we were beautiful as we are and our hair was beautiful as it is. It is a very myopic point of view to think that black people as a collective have the same journey, we don’t, we are individuals.

Some white women would actually be able to identify with that journey to self love because, ‘Curly hair is generally not cute past the age of 10.’ These words came from my white friend who beat her curls into submission with daily blowouts and flat ironing for 20 years. Some black people are conditioned to think a type 3 curl is the ultimate aka good hair, while some white girls are taught that poker straight hair is the ultimate good hair and their type 3 curls are ugly.

The reason why some #teamnatural stories resonate across the board is because it is not about race. It is about the ability to empathise as human beings to see how damaging it can be to be pounded down with a message that you are not good enough as you are.

2. Those who can teach!
Ultimately the nucleus of the natural community is hair. We celebrate and advocate for the beauty of natural hair Do you recall posts such as these white dads who really can do hair — here and here or the white mom who doesn’t want her black daughters hair touched — here . Many white moms and dads who have black or mixed race children will be right here trying to learn and do what is best for their children.

I have an elephant’s memory and I can recall on the old blogspot version of this blog where curly girl YSheena was originally featured and a white mom asked how she could get her daughter’s frizzy hair that she was considering chemically straightening to look like Ysheena’s which was ‘pretty and curly’. Commenters tore this lady to pieces and she of course disappeared. This predatory knee jerk reaction fails to educate and if you ever have the opportunity to, you should educate first, condemn last. How many black mothers have done the same?

I want an inclusive space because I advocate for children. Children with non-black parents who are keen on learning deserve a welcoming space both for parent and child. Exclusion is a disservice to the parents and the children.

3. Practice what you preach
If you find a natural site, you will almost always find articles about lack of acceptance of natural hair by others in the community, white and non white for example:
-Case of the doctor perpetually insulting the patient’s natural hair
-Case of the guy with locs who dislikes his girlfriend’s natural hair
-Case of the boss who said her natural hair looked like a troll doll

It would surprise some of you but many of these comments are said not in blatant racism but usually in ignorance. Ignorance that natural hair is actually the default and most ‘normal’ version of your hair. My husband who is white actually thought that black people mostly had straight hair. If you grew up in his home town where there was exactly 1 black girl, and the imagery you received from TV was all relaxed hair and weaves, what would you think?

Natural hair is not mainstream despite the explosion of the natural world and in all honesty it is not going to be unless we begin to tell our stories to the mainstream which happens to be white if you live in North America and Europe. If you want acceptance, you need to start accepting others into your clique otherwise why should they care about your stories, how would they see their poignancy and relevance?

The Conclusion : Since I started this piece with an apartheid reference, I will end it with some wise words that I liberated from the eternal sage Nelson Mandela, ’ To be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.’

Avatar

About The Natural Haven

Scientist on a hairy mission!

578
Leave a Reply

avatar
171 Comment threads
407 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
229 Comment authors
CalistaBubzLife StarlightOctavia LatsbLa BanditaEleanor Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
Notify of
Poshnera
Guest
Poshnera

In response to the Mandela quote I have to ask “What freedoms are white women lacking?” I understand that they aren’t always made to feel pretty but in the broader scope they are put on a pedestal for their beauty. Here is the fear and frustration that so many black women REALLY have. If we allow white women into THIS space that WE’VE created and where we go to support each other and talk about OUR issues how do we know that it won’t be snatched from us? History shows that anytime black people create a movement it most often… Read more »

Beautyismiree
Guest
Beautyismiree

This is the truth. I don’t know what it is with this wave of black people acting as if we live in a post-racial society and think that whites can relate to us on matters of oppression. I don’t mean they haven’t had their moments of it but at the end of the day their moments are usually everyday encounters we have with the world we live in.

Angela
Guest
Angela

Girllll. I think my heart just clapped! lol *Amen Amen!

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

This is a classic example of silencing AND a misuse of a Mandela quote smh If this girl knew anything about Mandela besides that quote she googled 2 seconds before she wrote this, she’d know that he was all for self-preservation. Mandela DIDN’T WANT integration, he wanted the invaders to leave his homeland! I swear as soon as a Black figurehead passes non-Black people pick apart their words and mold them to fit their kumbaya-we-are-the-world bullshit. What’s next, did Martin Luther King Jr. have a dream that 1A curlies could rep #teamnatural? Get gone lol

black nerd lover
Guest
black nerd lover

*Sigh* 1. By the logic in your first sentence, here are a few things that are apartheid: The Congressional Black Caucus in American Congress The National Association of the Advancement of Colored People Clutch Magazine Ebony Magazine The Black Girls Rock Organization Black Girls Run Black Girls Code Black Girl with Long Hair Oprah’s Legends Ball Essence Magazine’s Annual Black Women in Hollywood Luncheon President Obama’s “My Brother’s Keeper” Initiative Initiative to support black businesses The vast amount of natural hair companies that, yes, have multi-racial customers, but were built and continue to run with the black woman’s hair experience… Read more »

Poshnera
Guest
Poshnera

OMG PREACH PREACH PREACH!!!! As black people I think we have our minds focused on integration integration integration. We have the power to build ourselves, support ourselves, create future generations that won’t internalize the self-hate that has been passed down to us for so many generations. That’s what white people DON’T have to do. That is what makes our experience different, and you’re right those white parent’s stories were relevant because of context. Loving who we are as black people (all shades, textures, racially mixed or not) is OKAY! IT IS ALLOWED! It doesn’t make us racist for wanting to… Read more »

karencurly
Guest
karencurly

Drops the Mike and walks away! Oh how I love those who speak truth to power!!

O
Guest
O

JC lives in the UK and is from Kenya. Kenya was colonised by the British. The British ruled every colony differently.

Her experience is different from yours.

Gabs
Guest
Gabs

Sorry but I’m from Ghana, which was also colonised by the British and I too live in the UK but I still disagree vehemently with JC’s article. I may not be African American but I can still empathise with their experiences. Yes my family and I have not really been impacted by slavery, but as long as people keep asking why I don’t have my hair relaxed, my mum keeps believing that ‘our type’ of hair shouldn’t be left out and someone grabs my hair and immediately exclaims ‘it’s hard’, then the natural hair movement is still needed for black… Read more »

cappuchinochk
Guest
cappuchinochk

I’m from kenya and the British were no different than any other coliniser. If anything they perfected apartheid in kenya and other colinies. Kenya is still a mess and kenyan women still shun their natural hair, believe being dark skinned is less desirable, that anything foreign Is always better. Kenyans are still extremely colonized and will treat white people like GODS in their own country while looking down on their own. The closer to being white or foreign( white) the better you are. So I’m not surprised she’s arguing for white women rather than her own people. I’m not saying… Read more »

Hannah
Guest
Hannah

I’m from Zimbabwe — also a former British colony — and I find this article really dumb. We may not have experienced slavery as Black Americans did, but I can tell you right away that White Privilege is universal.

flouncingtart
Guest
flouncingtart

I’m form a country colonised by the British. My country is wrecked because of the British. Skin bleaching is rampant because of the British. Don’t you dare talk about how the British ruled every country differently as though they didn’t kill, subjugate, rape, enslave and steal ALL of our resources.

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

This post is on some other shit. Only a #NewBlack or a white person would equate being BARRED from a community and in response (KEYWORD:RESPONSE) forming your own group with other rejects, then refusing to let the community pretend nothing ever happened and join your group to APARTHEID. APARTHEID!!! HOW. DARE. YOU. The problem with these women is they don’t respect anyone else’s humanity but their own, that’s why we (the natural hair community) don’t want them. How dare you trivialize the “LEGAL” murder, exclusion and degradation faced by South Africans IN THEIR OWN HOMELAND UNTIL THE 1992 (and let’s… Read more »

Jada
Guest
Jada

Wow Jc usually has great articles but this is way off the mark. The natural hair movement is not “just hair.” It is about loving and accepting ourselves in a society that has for centuries told us we were ugly, inferior, and less than. Hair is a proxy for who you are and one of the only ways we have to represent ourselves, so as black women we focus on it. But we go through life constantly having to deal with an unchanging European standard of beauty: straight hair or loose 3a/3b curls. Yes some white women have frizzy hair… Read more »

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

These curlies/white women (and dominant groups in general) have a warped sense of empathy and no sympathy. I am not South African, and I have no relation to any. Yes, I am Black, but our struggles are NOT the same. I do not claim their struggle as my struggle, which is why I said they, not we. THIS is how you show sympathy, and it’s part of being a decent human being. I don’t deserve any cookies for saying what I said, and neither does anyone else; you are SUPPOSED to stand up for others. I did not even bring… Read more »

Puff
Guest

I feel you @CherryBOMB, I’m trying remain calm but it’s real hard. I’m trying to get at the heart of their motivation to “defend”. I feel like so many of us have been very clear that this isn’t about exclusion. It’s not like we said “Let’s have a party and not invite White people”. In fact @BGLH did a bang up job of saying White women are welcome to observe and LISTEN. Which is something many are NOT doing. Hell, I think it would be beneficial to have White allies who understood the oppression we get for our hair. White… Read more »

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

I agree wholeheartedly with your response @Puff! I just posted my ideas on the true reason why they feel this way, and I think they never learned sympathy and have a warped sense of empathy. When you’re taught that you’re the center of the universe all of your life, it’s an uphill battle convincing you otherwise. This is where their cognitive dissonance and willfully obtuse behavior stems from. It’s why they can critically think on the true meanings behind Plato’s Republic, yet give no thought into why it’s stupid to use the dictionary as an authority on anything ( I… Read more »

Puff
Guest

@CherryBOMB so much truth! The thing that gets me is I try to approach commenters by not slamming on them (which many of them whole heartedly deserve) but ask questions and try to engage them critically . Guess what? They peace right out or keep ignoring my questions and double down on their position. Sadly, that’s not exclusive to just White people. I’m sure you saw the back and forth I’m having with some Black people trying to tell people who is Black and who is not. It gets really disheartening when you have to fight your own or what… Read more »

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

Nicely put! No matter what we say, they hear ALL, and they think NOT I. They don’t want (or even know how) to critically think. Girl, it doesn’t matter if you sugar coat or let your anger out, if someone doesn’t wanna hear you, they won’t. That’s why I could care less how people perceive my posts, I say what I feel and stand by my words. And you’re right, there are people who read our posts and learn a little something. And any Black person who parrots back the ideals of their oppressor is a #NewBlack lol. I feel… Read more »

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

*also, to add to what I just posted:

A) Biracial/mixed Black people did NOT create this hierarchy, white supremacy did
B) Many non-biracial/non-mixed Black people feed into this pecking order as well; it’s not just biracial/mixed-people doing it
C) This hierarchy holds true in white society ONLY when the goal is divide-and-conquer the community. Otherwise yes, we are all seen/treated as Black (aka when there’s no need to divide, just conquer).

ZP
Guest

Amen. It was a shortsighted and incredibly insulting analogy.

Natalia
Guest
Natalia

There is NO way she knows anything about history (other than a quick scroll through Google), using a word like apartheid in this context. That’s incredibly disrespectful, hurtful, and down right ignorant. She’s comparing a movement of black women embracing their own version of beauty to a South African apartheid government that tried to create a virus that would kill blacks by attacking their melanin cells?!?!?!?! (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/110947.stm)? That’s disgraceful! But according to her, we’re the bad guys here… Side Note: CherryBOMB, I’ve been reading you’re posts for the past two days and you are on fire. I’m going to need… Read more »

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

haha thanks 🙂 I would have stopped posting a long time ago, but I’m enjoying sharing my knowledge and learning from you guys. (Tbh I actually don’t care to explain anything to Jc, she has proven that she didn’t take any of the prereqs for this class lmao she needs to go find herself and collect her edges that we snatched) You guys are so smart! I’m glad most of us can think critically!

Jc
Guest

I just want to say that you are mentioning organisations that will not necessarily endorse what you are saying. Oprah’s Legends Ball while highlighting achievements of black women did include invited guests who are excellent at their fields and are white. It is not saying we cannot celebrate black women, but saying all people of all races can celebrate and recognise the achievements of black women — so yes white people were invited to the party http://www.oprah.com/entertainment/The-Legends-Ball/

Puff
Guest

Jc, what are you doing?? You dissect one (frankly insignificant part) to try to what? Discredit some of the very valid points they made? Can you come on here and actually engage, listen and discuss thoughtfully? I’m all about learning something new and if someone presented some really sound points I would acknowledge that. Can you please comment on your interpretation of racism? It to me creates a dangerous false equivalence that is often used against non whites. Yes, it is true that anyone can be discriminated against but in America (and many other countries) White people are the dominant… Read more »

black nerd lover
Guest
black nerd lover

From the Wiki entry on Oprah’s Legends Ball: “Oprah Winfrey’s Legends Ball was a three-day celebration held by Oprah Winfrey honoring twenty-five African American women in art, entertainment, and civil rights.” Oprah’s own words on the ball: “These women, who have been meaningful to so many of us over the years, are legends who have been magnificent in their pioneering and advancing of African-American women. It is because of their steps that our journey has no boundaries.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oprah_Winfrey’s_Legends_Ball From the chair of The Congressional Black Congress: It is my great honor and privilege to serve as the 23rd Chair of… Read more »

black nerd lover
Guest
black nerd lover

From Black Girl with Long Hair: “Black Girl with Long Hair is a website dedicated to the ever-growing community of black and bi-racial women who choose to wear their hair naturally — with no use of chemicals and minimal use of heat, weave or extensions.” http://bglh-marketplace.com/about/ From the Wiki entry on Essence’s Annual Black Women in Hollywood Luncheon “Essence magazine holds an award ceremony annually to honor black women who have achieved success in Hollywood.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essence_(magazine)#Black_Women_In_Hollywood From President Obama’s “My Brother’s Keeper” Initiative “President Obama is taking action to launch My Brother’s Keeper – a new initiative to help every… Read more »

Apartheid
Guest
Apartheid

Native Americans were also invited to the ‘party’. In my country the black natives were also invited to the party then wiped the hell out with your beloved apartheid.

Apartheid
Guest
Apartheid

my above comment was directed to JC and her party invitations to all mankind.

J2
Guest
J2

I swear comments like yours is why I LOVE the natural hair movement. This “just hair” is causing a new mental awareness, self acceptance, and unity. I honestly feel that as we black women continue on this track, a few years from now the black men will be forced to do the same and our community will be stronger and better. This no doubt would benefit the world. We have lost our way (with the violence, devaluing of education, oversexualization, etc) a good while after the civil rights era but I think we’re headed in the right direction again.

t.c.
Guest
t.c.

I wish I could “thumbs up” this comment a thousand times. Basically, this article is STRAIGHT UP racist. The author is AGAINST a racially marginalized minority lifting themselves up and away from a racist gaze. BGLH has published a racist article against the BW who support this site. Like I said before, this is worse than Curly Nikki. And yes, being that the article is racist, it is dangerous and abusive. BGLH needs to remove it.

Rehs Sllew
Guest
Rehs Sllew

If other ethnic groups are worried about the team natural element why not say team natural before the Black community. Why have anything to say about it now?

NoDisrespek
Guest
NoDisrespek

One thing that I have learned in the last week is that people–black, white, whatever–generally do NOT understand what racism actually entails. Racism, particularly in the United States, requires prejudice plus (and this is the key word here) POWER. Racism is a cultural, social, and INSTITUTIONAL phenomenon. I, as a Black woman, do not have the cultural cache in this country (and I doubt anywhere else, really) to enforce my own standards of beauty and apply them to all others in such a way that anyone who does not conform to *my* standard is automatically considered to be ugly by… Read more »

Beautyismiree
Guest
Beautyismiree

To say that they can realate to our experience is a lie. For centuries did they have to deal with the ridicule of not having white skin. You can try all you want to find a way to equalize their discrimination to ours but at the end of the day when you put a white girl with curly hair in a room with a black girl with curly hair who are you think people are gonna like more/bother less. The black girl will get questions/comments like “Is that weave?” “Are you mixed? You must be mixed because black people can’t… Read more »

Jacky
Guest
Jacky

I agree! Especially with those parts about where they would “Columbus” it and about including that one token person who happens to be biracial. It happens even today, you see it in advertisements, magazines, even the picture used for this article, etc eg. Seven or eight females in an advert, only one is black( if they choose to add a black at all ) and this is after we grumbled and complained for years about how we were being discriminated( then they finally started adding just one or two black people in a sea of whites ). Why should we… Read more »

Jussayin
Guest
Jussayin

when will black people stop prostituting ourselves for nickels. why do we give and let everyone take from us when deep down we know we will just get a slap in the face in return.

Jay
Guest
Jay

The second point I just can’t

Excluding white people from the movement doesn’t mean that they can’t still learn. I have a white friend that I’ve given tips on how to care for her hair similar to how I do. I am carrying the practices that I’ve learnt from the movement to someone another race. But my white friend wouldn’t then proceed to say that she is a part of the natural hair movement, she is still excluded but is still learning

Zedzed
Guest
Zedzed

Community is important and we as black people have historically welcomed everybody into our communities, where has that led us?
We NEED our space, we do not need AFFIRMATION from anybody most definitely NOT white people who are the cause of most of the issues we have in the first place.
Saying that does not mean I’m racist, it’s saying that I’m GOOD ENOUGH and do not need anybody’s validation to accept myself and my black brethren

Jacky
Guest
Jacky

Right on! Preach sister!

Jacky
Guest
Jacky

You let them in and they push you out OF YOUR OWN SPACE!, that’s just wrong…

t.c.
Guest
t.c.

You better preach.

anastasia
Guest
anastasia

Black Nerd Lover, T.C., CherryBomb, Puff and so many others on this post and the previous:

THANK YOU, THANK YOU!!! Much love! For real. Warmest Hugs Ladies!

And J.C.:
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/dianaross_contemptanddisdain.gif[/img]

Ash
Guest
Ash

OMG, I laughed soooo hard!!

Ms. Vee
Guest
Ms. Vee

AMEN!!

Boo Boo
Guest

I think you know the answer to this. In my opinion, it’s about where your issue stem from, deep down. The only real thing I think all naturals in the natural hair community share is that throughout US history, Afro-Textured hair has been hated simply because it signifies Blackness. The direct reason why you’ve embraced your natural may be different (I went natural because I found relaxers time consuming and painful), but I think we all share this one characteristic. The white girl featured cannot relate to this, which is why she doesn’t belong. If she gets hate for her… Read more »

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

… did you copy and paste my post from the last article lmfao

Cherise
Guest
Cherise

Holy smokes! I just read the article and this person definitely did copy and paste your response.

Boo Boo
Guest

yah, I did, I saw that it was a really valid point and something that I wanted the authour of this article to see. But I didn’t think you would write the same thing twice. It wasn’t until I clicked send that I realized that I should have given you credit but when I went back to look I couldn’t find you. But anyways, Im so sorry

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

ehh I ain’t mad atcha. I guess it is relevant 🙂

Chiazo
Guest

Again, I wouldn’t be angry if a white mother or father wanted to get on here or any black hair forum and ask questions pertaining to their black child’s hair. However, if they themselves wanted to ask questions about their own hair or be apart of the community, that’s where I wouldn’t agree. You can look through articles and learn about black hair. I as a 14 year can read a textbook without having to join in the class. Especially, if that class does not pertain to me. Finally, let’s be real, why would other people see us as more… Read more »

Tiffany
Guest
Tiffany

The picture of this article before you click the link is exactly what will happen to the face of the movement when we let white women and others co-opt it. We all know this, because this has historically happened to us over and over again because we are too nice; even though we never see whites and other races make their avenues for “everyone”. Via these comments on BGLH, I am happy to see that their are a lot of black women who know their history and aren’t falling for this charade.

Deedeemaha
Guest
Deedeemaha

I would like to have seen a 4bc girl in the picture but I guess she was excluded. Oh yea, she came to BGLH. That picture says it all, we want to support you but not all the way. We will still pick out of your blackness what’s most desirable. Loose curls. If this conversation was about #teamkinkyhair, I wonder would they want to be associated with it? Would this article have been written? Would they really want their loose curls associated with the word kinky? But they got fooled by the word “Natural” , and did not understand it… Read more »

Knotty Natural
Guest

RE: If this conversation was about #teamkinkyhair, I wonder would they want to be associated with it? Would this article have been written?

Yes and Yes! There are white women who believe they have kinky hair.

I do like #TeamKinkyHair! #TeamAfroTexturedHair Anything that points to the fact that this is exclusive to women of African descent

Nhlanhla
Guest
Nhlanhla

OMG i just can’t believe she just compared this whole #teamnatural thing to Apartheid.I am a South African and im so disappointed. Please read up about what Apartheid was and what it did to S.Africans of color. It was not a hair thing!

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

Do you guys see this? THIS IS WHY. THIS. IS. WHY. This article right here proved EVERY SINGLE POINT I made in the last post. They. Do. Not. Care. To. LISTEN! They just want to speak over everybody and have their opinion held most high, just like in every other aspect of society. me, me, me. I bet this girl didn’t read or think about AANYTHING we’ve been saying! SHE DOES’NT EVEN UNDERSTAND THAT THE MOVEMENT GOES DEEPER THAN “I LOVE MEEEE” Girl, where did anyone say non-Black curlies NEVER suffered? Where did we say you can’t enjoy the info?… Read more »

Boo Boo
Guest

she is black and she regularly posts articles for BGLH

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

…Then she don’t love herself/her people. But I’m sleep.

O
Guest
O

JC isn’t from the US and she should have made that very clear in her posts.

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

…That’s even worse. She REALLY needs to stay in her lane then. You don’t see my ass trivializing the LGBT rights movement because “I could draw in the 3rd grade so I thought I was gay for like 2 seconds” (geeett it?? I know I’m lame lol)

#Adoseofreality
Guest
#Adoseofreality

Whether she is from the States is irrelevant in this context. It’s not about being from the US or not.

It’s about not spreading and glorifying ignorance, especially to the degree Jc so clearly is. There are several African women (including other Kenyan women like herself) and other non-American Black women who have commented on here and also agree that this article is complete and utter horse shit. (No offense to horses).

Leesha
Guest
Leesha

Lmao at this post!!

Dorothy
Guest
Dorothy

I think you should stick to science articles

Jo
Guest
Jo

Well… When I think of a black person’s hair, I think of course, curly, dense and curly or any combination of the above. Many black women (and some men) have been straightening or straight-weaving their hair because of the straight-hair trend that affects all races in a few cultures, but the main underlying reason is that non-straight hair on a black person is related to the old-time belief that Caucasian features (face structure, hair, skin tone) are more valuable. I don’t believe that many non black races can relate to the dark underlying reason. Rather, they relate to the reason… Read more »

MyHair
Guest
MyHair

Not one of those women in the picture at the beginning of the article have hair like mine.

Puff
Guest

I’m really disappointed that you kicked off with the biggest false equivalence ever. First and foremost, defining racism has already been well discussed at the other post but lets get this straight; racism is about a race using their power and privilege to oppress other races. In America this is resoundingly for White people and sometimes people with White people status. Secondly, BGLH came on here and said White women are welcome to observe and listen. That is certainly not what Waterlily716 or other White women who chose to comment did. What they wanted to do is what you are… Read more »

Roo
Guest
Roo

Thank you!! Noone knows what struggles other people have faced. Someone can be mixed race with a white skin tone but with kinky hair. It is ignorant to exclude them from ‘team natural’. The most important thing about the hair movement to me was about enlightening women to look after their natural hair and not to sucuumb to the pressures of straightening their hair by the media. The movement shouldn’t create barriers.

Roo
Guest
Roo

The term ‘natural hair for black women’ to me that makes more sense than team natural. team natural is an ambiguous term

Brittany
Guest
Brittany

It’s cool.
Consider your membership revoked. You can’t sit with us anymore.

You can’t demand inclusion in a movement and tell the people who created it (Black women to inclue: AA and Afro-Latinas), what the “true intent and meaning” of it is.

#teamnatural, Natural Hair, and the Natural Hair movement had a singular target audience–Black women. WE don’t need to change a damn thing. It makes perfect sense.

Google #teamnatural, Natural Hair, and the Natural Hair movement… tell me how many non-blacks you see in the results. Go on, I’ll wait.

Roo
Guest
Roo

The word teamnatural doesnt explicitly mean natural hair for black women, people have a right to interpret it however they wish.
I dont care about my ‘membership’ with teamnatural, I dont need to feel so strongly about a movement to give myself a sense of belonging.

I’m african and live in the UK. My mentality is obviously different to that of african americans, and I just don’t understand this over the top reaction to white women considering themselves as natural. Anyone can call themselves natural and heck team natural.

Dananana
Guest
Dananana

You know what I’ve noticed in all of this? The Black women that seem to be caping so hard for including White women in the NHM? All of direct East African, Nigerian, or British African descent. I wonder what it is about being across the pond that makes you stop being empathetic to the struggles of other Black people. Maybe it’s because they’re not as far removed from colonialism. Or maybe it incenses them that we’re so comfortable talking and ranting about issues they’re too uptight to even mention. Or maybe it’s that because they haven’t faced what AA’s have… Read more »

Finn
Guest
Finn

Roo was derailing on CN. Be gone!

juanicole617
Guest
juanicole617

Too, this isn’t just about hair but a self identity crisis among Black women globally. There’s a real deeply ingrained psychological reason, passed down from generation to generation, as to why Black women globally relaxed their hair. Black aesthetics were globally considered unattractive. This is the reason for the movement, not the hash tag, the movement. To uplift those around the world, who realized we have been practicing a form of self-hate. Not that we hate ourselves but we woke up and realized something wasn’t right about our mothers not having the knowledge to care for our natural hair. There… Read more »

maralondon
Guest
maralondon

It doesn’t matter that you live in the UK. Your mentality is different cause you choose not to educate yourself and are in denial. Please don’t imply that all black people who live in the UK have the same mentality as yourself because it is not so. The hang ups we have here regarding hair, and i’m talking mainly people from African Caribbean background are not so intense as in America but we still have a long way to go in accepting our beauty and self worth against the European’s. Please try and check out a film called ‘Beauty is..’… Read more »

Aico
Guest
Aico

No, Dananana- there are a few idiots like Roo and Temi. The majority of us Africans get it, know it, and live it. Don’t make that mistake.

#Adoseofreality
Guest
#Adoseofreality

“The movement shouldn’t create barriers.” I’m going to stop you right there. This movement was created BECAUSE, historically and currently, WHITES have been and are the ones who created and continue to create barriers for Blacks. You want to talk about exclusion? *Chuckles* Go talk to any White magazine editors, film producers, and network execs and ask them why they don’t include and CORRECTLY represent you and other Black people in THEIR magazines, shows, feature films, and other media outlets. Go on, ask them. Don’t be shy. Smh. For f**k’s sake, there is NOTHING WRONG with wanting to preserve a… Read more »

Michelle
Guest
Michelle

I think as an ‘older’ person reading the above, I can’t help but think that younger people are buying into this whole reverse racism thing. I have never met a ‘black’ person who has been conditioned to HATE others, look down on others, or have the POWER to affect someone else’s existence due to their racist views . The ideal of ‘race’ and racial categories were made up by Europeans and is ingrained in their culture (not blaming them for this). I think it would be informative for a young black person to not only study African history but study… Read more »

O
Guest
O

If they did study African and European history they would be shocked to discover before the Europeans worked out stealing of both produce and people would get them what they wanted, they happily traded with many African areas.

I say areas because African countries were drawn on a map by Europeans.

maralondon
Guest
maralondon

Thank you. I don’t think there are enough Africans who truly know what went on in their countries during colonial times. We black people in the global sense need to start educating ourselves on real history and not the tainted history.

Tabatha
Guest
Tabatha

I think team natural belongs to everyone who is natural no matter the race, no matter the context. But I think what people are expressing is that Latinos have their pages, Asians, Have their pages, Caucasians have theirs, Middle Easterners have theirs and so on and so forth. We as a people just want a place to kind of call our own. I feel for the people who have black children and they are not black or have a child with curly/kinky hair that may be Latin, Caucasian whatever and just need a little guidance on what to use to… Read more »

O
Guest
O

Not sure you got so many down posts.

It’s obvious from these discussions people can’t read.

flouncingtart
Guest
flouncingtart

Latin@s can also be black. Latin@ is not a race. There are black, Asian, white, mixed race, Middle Eastern Latin@s.

flouncingtart
Guest
flouncingtart

In fact, in the world we live in, there are more black Latin@s than there are black English-speaking North Americans. Brazil has the largest black population outside of Nigeria and the South American continent has the largest black population outside of Africa. Colonisers brought many slaves to South America in order to cultivate the land–more slaves than were brought to North America. The lack of education about what Latin@ means plus the lack of representation for black Latin@s in the mainstream has caused this confusion. This is why we need places that are for black people or rather people of… Read more »

latalina
Guest
latalina

Took the words right out of my mouth!

latalina
Guest
latalina

You’re right! South America was once connected to Africa, and they are going to drift back together again, due to the tectonic-plate shifting. IF you look at a map from 100’s of years ago, it looked totally different than today’s modern map. Either way, it was obviously easier, at one point, for invaders to transport slaves to South America.

Tiffany
Guest
Tiffany

Ladies, white women are trolling us. We’ve said our piece on them not being in our house, so this stuff needs to not gain any more traction. All it is doing is getting them hits, acknowledgment, and exposure that they sure as hell don’t need. Stop going on twitter, facebook, etc. arguing with them and their misguided supporters. A lot of intelligent, eloquent posts have been made about this. If they still don’t get it, just leave them in their privileged bubble, and leave the black people supporting this on their kumbaya trains. Let’s let this die. We are not… Read more »

Poshnera
Guest
Poshnera

I agree today makes my last post on this issue. It’s exhausting and if they don’t get it by now that means that they just don’t want to. Girl Bye!

Deb
Guest
Deb

Interestingly (and horrifyingly) enough, this is what Sarah, the girl in the original CN article posted on FB, this needs to be spread around:

[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/comment.png[/img]

Carleee
Guest
Carleee

Going into ethnic spaces to thrash around and piss people off is the epitome of whiteness.

t.c.
Guest
t.c.

I honestly thought BGLH was better than this. But to see them join hand in hand with white women to attack BW for standing up for ourselves is absolutely disgusting. In fact, this is far worse than what Curly Nikki did. Too use the system of Apartheid, under which black men, women, and children, were tortured and murdered, as being synonymous with white women getting their feelings hurt because they can’t have what they want, is as absolutely sick.

Jacky
Guest
Jacky

I don’t hate other races and i do like seeing other races share their features on natural hair sites. BUT, I’m just saying, other races need to include blacks on their sites too. No, i don’t want biracial people to feel excluded and yes i would like white women to be featured and to be able to reach out to naturals for help and get it. But a lot of times, whites carry on things that blacks have done for years and make it seem like it’s theirs and theirs only( see the Kendall Jenner cornrow controversy ) while excluding… Read more »

Martha
Guest
Martha

Exactly what I’m to say. People think that I’m following behind the white woman because of my comment when I clearly said women of all races. There’s more than just the white woman and last time I checked all was plural meaning more than one, so thank you. 🙂

flouncingtart
Guest
flouncingtart

A white person getting their feelings hurt because they can’t have everything isn’t the same as racial segregation.

#Adoseofreality
Guest
#Adoseofreality

” Let’s not exclude them or whites from our sites but at the same time, let’s raise awareness to the discrimination and unfair treatment that’s been directed at blacks for years so that it can end once and for all.” *Sigh* Whites don’t need awareness on discrimination and unfair treatment of minorities, Jacky. They KNOW that it happens. You wanna know HOW they know? Because THEY’RE the ones who practice it. That’s how. I’m going to assume that you are fairly young (perhaps a teenager) but I apologize in advance if I presume incorrectly. I say this not as an… Read more »

Ronke
Guest
Ronke

This picture for this post is case and point as to why #teamnatural should stay within the black community. No kinks? No coils? No naps? Not a chocolate skinned G in sight!

NO BUENO!!

#byefelicia

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

Exactly. I’m disengaging; this is a bait article. I’ve spoken my peace; I’ve explained my views and addressed everything in this article already (and so have most of you other brilliant ladies). I don’t need high BP from fighting trolls. Try again, BGLH.

In the words of Simon Cowell (and all the other women in the last thread):

It’s a NO from me.”

Deb
Guest
Deb

Bait article is worth the amazing replies on here that break down what’s really happening here. History always repeats itself if we let it but many people (whites and some black folks) are conveniently looking at the surface and having knee jerk reactions.

We aren’t just making this issue complex out of thin air, IT IS REALITY whether you want to accept it or not!!!

CherryBOMB
Guest
CherryBOMB

I agree. But what can we expect? In school you’re taught to behave and follow directions, not think critically lol I got straight A’s in high school not cause I’m a genius, I just didn’t cause trouble and followed directions. My AP US History teacher bumped me from a B+ to an A+ when I asked him to, literally just because I never gave attitude (yes, he said this!). I peeped that ish and kept it up for 4 years, but sorry #NewBlacks, the real world don’t work that way (as I learned in undergrad lol) don’t play yourself. You… Read more »

Chinwe
Guest

LOL! This made me spit up my water.

Deb
Guest
Deb

I was about to say the exact same thing!

Ashlyn
Guest
Ashlyn

All 3 of the people she mentioned in the ‘3. Practice what you preach’ section were black…that kinda proves the point showing about this being almost a black thing. It’s in our experiences not white peoples. I understand that we could be resources to those who have children with kinky or curly hair but if white women want acceptance of their own hair why don’t they start in their communities first? Why can’t they email their magazines or blog about it like most of the natural hair people did? They have mainstream media. They did this with the ‘stop photoshopping’… Read more »

really?really?REALLY?
Guest
really?really?REALLY?

“chocolate hair vanilla care(she is a white mother with a black daughter)” you AIN’T never gonna see a BLACK family adopting a white child in America…the agencies will not allow it(i…but you will see vice versa though…it is ok to have white women and non-back women apart of #teamnatural because it is for everyone…but why is it SO hard for BLACK women with kinks, naps and ebony skin to get into mainstream? I mean 2014 and Lupita is now getting Lancome? I mean dang is it every 20–30 years we gonna see this?! One per 20 years? Ok, um REALLY?… Read more »

DeeDee
Guest
DeeDee

Upon observing the picture related to this post, I can’t help but notice who the center of attention falls upon. It sure as hell ain’t “Chilli” (lol). This is how it’s always portrayed in the media. The white girl, front and center and the black girl, off by the wayside. Can we PLEASE have something for ourselves??? PLEASE? I have white friends, one in particular, whose hairs is gorgeous! It’s dark and curly, but she understands that we (blacks) have two different struggles when it comes to our hair. So does my Hispanic friends whose hair types are naturally curly… Read more »

ZP
Guest

“This predatory knee jerk reaction fails to educate and if you ever have the opportunity to, you should educate first, condemn last.” It is not our duty to educate white women on their hair. We are not their nannies, caregivers, or mammies. It is not any black person’s duty to do the work in educating them, while they sit back and benefit from a movement that has already been built on our backs. It is not our duty as a historically marginalized group, to democratize our spaces while they remain steadfast in privatizing theirs. It is not our duty to… Read more »

Deb
Guest
Deb

MASSIVE ROUND OF APPLAUSE to your last paragraph. I hope JC and others with her viewpoint read comments on here and ponder on them. Noone’s forcing them to change their minds but just try to understand where we are coming from.

Recent Grad
Guest
Recent Grad

Amen! *applause*

Leesha
Guest
Leesha

By the way — where are the black people with afro hair on that top image??? Why is there only one black person there? And she has loose hair? It looks EXACTLY the same as ALL the other exclusive curly websites there are. So this article is void.

Morg
Guest
Morg

I’m going to take it as coincidence that this article was written the same week that a male writer authored an article on why Orange is the New Black should have a more fair representation of men.… pardon while I continue to play the worlds smallest violin.

juanicole617
Guest
juanicole617

LOL, more representation of men???? Puh-leeze! Yeah, I pulled out my tiny violin too.

shakari
Guest
shakari

if you want acceptance then you need to start accepting others into your clique”.

as a natural black woman im not looking for acceptance from anyone except myself and certainly not from the mainstream white media.us black women having predominately sites like this is for us and only us. sites like this are the only places i can come to and see my fellow black women represented and focused on. white women literally are the standard for beauty and they are the face of any cosmetic campaign on television and online, why do they want inclusion here TOO? entitlement. thats why.

Lynn
Guest
Lynn

I couldnt agree with you more. When the focus is not specifically on white woman/people they tend to get their panties in a bunch. As if everything is not already about them to begin with.
Im just done discussing this issue further

Deb
Guest
Deb

OMG it reminds me of posts on tumblr that will state “BLACK WOMEN ARE BEAUTIFUL” or something applauding black beauty and an almost always white poster will leave a comment saying “WHY IS IT JUST BLACK WOMEN, ALL WOMEN ARE BEAUTIFUL”.

Instant freaking rage. Some people cannot see past their own noses and it’s even more sad when black people do the same.

Carla
Guest
Carla

Amen Shakari. Those are my exact thoughts. Black women are pretty much excluded from mainstream everything (media, fashion, feminism etc), but when we want to have our own movement to uplift/encourage our unique beauty and history/share our stories WE’RE accused of not being inclusive??? Something does not add up here. I will not entertain it. Black women have been excluded from so many movements historically only to be brought in as an after thought when it was convenient. It’s time to stay focused on your own. Others can definitely share, but it is different. I truly feel as though black… Read more »

Martha
Guest
Martha

I do agree with you on this one. The website does say ‘black girl long hair’.

Kendra
Guest
Kendra

Natural hair movement is basically about not using the creamy crack. Whites women never used it. So they don’t belong in this group. It’s not racism it’s logic.

Kendra
Guest
Kendra

You’re saying it’s rascist to believe blacks should where whites cannot? That’s not true and it’s not a double standard when you look at the intentions of both groups. You can’t say everyone deserves the same freedoms when there are those who would abuse it. Case in point NMLBA who would use their association to molest young boys.
Blacks in South Africa gathered to discuss how to get equal rights. Whites gathered to keep them from being free.

lablooplah
Guest
lablooplah

honestly, idk. I feel like this shouldn’t be a big deal as it should be. The thing is yes black people (mixed races included) have the most varied hair pattern (as far as i know)so tips what we do for our hair can really help those who have similiar hair patterns even if they are non-black peoples. For example, i remember one white woman blogging about doing the no-poo method, and just washing her hair with water, and white commentators dogged the heck out her. I was like wow. If it works it works. But on the other hand, i… Read more »

#Adoseofreality
Guest
#Adoseofreality

The fact that you think this is just about hair for Black people says it all. If you believe it’s simply about dead keratin sprouting from the scalp, then of course you don’t think this should be a big deal.

One commenter put it in a very simplistic but powerful statement that I sincerely hope you, and everyone else who still doesn’t (or refuses) to listen and understand, finally do.

White women suffer WITH their hair. Black women suffer BECAUSE of their hair.”

Shaprice
Guest
Shaprice

Im sorry I love my sisters of other races, however why is it that we always have to involve other races in everything when we have several years of exclusion in everyway possible. You are not persecuted for your hair and told from birth that what God gave you isnt good enough. Why is it that you need to be a part of this so bad. Are we not allowed anything to ourselves?

alphacentauri
Guest
alphacentauri

We need to close ranks and huddle in real tight like the guys from the movie 300. You’re not getting in becky and Susan. I don’t give a damn!

Liz
Guest
Liz

The thing is in our society pretty much every space is created for whites to the exclusion of other races, unless specified otherwise. The default is white, the beauty standard is white, and the people who hold power in this country are, for the most part, white. So when black people try to create a space that excludes white people, I don’t see that as apartheid, I see it as creating a safe space in a society where we have historically been marginalized.

(Also props to BGLH for posting both sides of the discussion)

Queen
Guest
Queen

This is ridiculous. We can’t have ANYTHING, can we? People exclude us from their spaces all the time, but God forbid we don’t sit and cry in a corner but instead make our own spaces and move on. There are so many websites for women of all backgrounds and cultures with curly hair. Why must you have this one too?

Queen
Guest
Queen

And the comparison to apartheid? So off base it isn’t even funny. What’s next, comparing their so called “exclusion” to slavery?

Carleee
Guest
Carleee

Yeah, so many of your articulated the problems with this article. It ignores the history of racial oppression and the social hierarchies surrounding race. Black people who want to mobilize and reclaim their ethnic features are not being racist against white people. If white people want to reclaim their features then they should do it in their own spaces. White people feel as though their viewpoint and needs should be at the CENTER of all discourse. Yet, blacks fight simply to be present in discourse let alone heard as actors with opinions. This article from JC (Natural Haven) is ridiculous… Read more »

Martha
Guest
Martha

You’re right about the website being a black one as the title does imply that, but I thought that this was white women want to be apart of team natural. The title from J.C. is misleading. If she wants to be apart of the natural hair community then yes there are other sites for hair such as naturally curly. Maybe that is where people think I went wrong when I made my earlier comment. Well I see this website specifically say BLACK girl long hair. I guess I put it the wrong way.

Carleee
Guest
Carleee

Yet this isn’t about just black women claiming websites. This is also about claiming the concept of “going natural”, “natural hair movement”, etc… White women can not “go natural” unless they have had to chemically (perm, heat, texlax) alter their hair to be accepted by the dominant Anglo-European culture. Going natural does not mean letting your hair out of a bun. It means dealing with the stigma of society telling you that your natural hair (and features and mere presence and blackness) is an abomination. You cannot “go natural” unless you’ve had to deal with practically no representation of someone… Read more »

Kayla
Guest
Kayla

In the words of Malcolm X

“It’s just like when you’ve got some coffee that’s too black, which means it’s too strong. What do you do? You integrate it with cream, you make it weak. But if you pour too much cream in it, you won’t even know you ever had coffee. It used to be hot, it becomes cool. It used to be strong, it becomes weak. It used to wake you up, now it puts you to sleep.”

Let that sink in.

Nik
Guest
Nik

I commend BGLH for trying to present both sides of this issue but this article just doesn’t make sense. There is a Jewish Film Festival in my neighbourhood tomorrow. I intend to go and enjoy it. I am sure I will relate to the films on many levels. However, it would be utterly ridiculous for me to suggest that they include a black film in the line up. The festival just isn’t about black movies. There is nothing racist about that. If a white women wants to read BGLH or CurlyNikki more power to her. If our discussions resonate with… Read more »

mari
Guest
mari

I completely agree. You cannot be a part of everything and we shouldn’t let the politically correct brigade try and stop this movement or divide it as it is a bait so let’s stay united in celebrating our beautiful hair. Being natural for me is about celebrating our God given hair, hair education and sharing the journey and also discovering new brands. ”)

flouncingtart
Guest
flouncingtart

There are definitely black Jews though (who are conveniently under-respresented and even oppressed by white Jews), so there could be a space for that, though I understand what you’re trying to say.

t.c.
Guest
t.c.

And not a single one of those women in that picture has a hair texture that is representative of the MAJORITY of black women.

Tammy
Guest
Tammy

And that picture will be EXACTLY what the natural hair movement will look like when white women take it over.

Mkay
Guest
Mkay

They can’t take away something that they did not give you 🙂
Your kinks and coils are yours and you’ll always have a community of women to identify with.

wonderlash
Guest
wonderlash

I have hair like the darker girl on the right, and I agree with you. I don’t think i t’s right either. I am curly but I DO think the natural hair movement should just be for black women who fall into the 4a-4c category. That WAS the original purpose of the movement in t he first place. I’m even shaking my 3a- 3b curls in disgust. 1000% bs this is just plain stupid.

cacey
Guest
cacey

yassss! one doesn’t have to have type 4 hair to be able to see that this would be bogus. i’m already disgusted that the prevailing images in marketing surrounding natural hair seem to only be of curls that look like mine, but it would be ten thousand times less diverse and inclusive if white women were permitted voices in the community. I say we leave no room for ambiguity and just call it the “black natural hair movement” since so many people wanna play dumb over “natural hair movement”, which white women weren’t cosigning on anyway until they saw US… Read more »

aad
Guest
aad

Actually, that’s a picture from the Curls webiste (http://www.curls.biz/). IT is indicative of how companies want black women’s money, but will not use us in their ads. If they do use us, we have to be type 3. It’s a shame really. But if you look at any website geared towards “natural” hair, you’ll see the same thing. Ethnically ambiguous women with type three hair (I personally don’t believe the blonde in the picture is all white, but she is definitely ambiguous). But, most of their customers are black women with hair in the 4s. It’s taxation without representation.……or something… Read more »

cheni_zim
Guest
cheni_zim

urgh at the apartheid reference. This is a silly and far reaching article. Its very obvious that the author is trying to be an antagonist, I mean really you took the time to write this. I’m annoyed i’m commenting as it adds to the comment, people like this are not needed in the movement. Every other race has their own movements that we can all respect why cant we all celebrate and take pride in our strengths. It does not take anything away from white women when we celebrate our fros, why do they need to be included in everything.… Read more »

Alie
Guest
Alie

EXCLUSION DOESNT MEAN RACISM
Black people dont have the power to be racist (prediuce yes, not racist, we are the “infereior” race remember?)

I DONT EVEN KNOW WHY WE ARE EXPLAINING THIS TO WHITE PEOPLE.

The AFRO TEXTURED NATURAL HAIR COMMUNITY IS FOR AND ONLY BLACK PEOPLE WITH AFRO TEXTURED HAIR

THE END.

I’m sick of all these white people whining like a little child who cant get the candy from the store.
Its not for you.

Get over it, go back to your privilege.

Alie
Guest
Alie

Well damn I cant spell when I’m upset!
Forgive my typos.

*sips tea*

Lurie
Guest

I appreciate the effort here but this article is a perfect example of the dangers of false equivalence. Whites and Blacks don’t occupy the same positions of power. Suggesting that if Black people do something it is racist — simply because it would be racist if a White person did it is one of the most unsophisticated and elementary forms of racial analysis out there. We really must be more discerning in our understandings of the complexities of race. Being Natural for most Black women is a CULTURAL experience — a stage of identity for many. It is not merely… Read more »

Honeybrown1976
Guest
Honeybrown1976

Jc, go find yourself before you tell others living the truth anything. Black people don’t have time to settle and teach others. I’m not living my life to be someone’s magical negro.

Your article ignores the reality of “post-racial America” and the history of this country that’s still implemented today. If I’m correct, do you even live here? I thought you lived in Europe; your sense of reality is far different.

Maybe you needed additional clicks to your site. But, this op-ed isn’t the way to get them.

Mehna
Guest
Mehna

Magical Negro”… love it!

Scrolling
Guest
Scrolling

“YOU AINT GOT THE ANSWERS!”…And the author proved that in the introduction by confidently comparing apartheid to…hair. Apartheid is related to oppression and hate. When a group of “minorities” create a sector dedicated to very specific experiences that they share, it’s because they are not represented, so they do it themselves. They’re not creating support groups out of hate or intentions to oppress, but to uplift and inspire. Concepts such as apartheid tend to be the very reason why communities such as “team natural” exist among minority groups. Looser textured, non-black people are definitely natural if they don’t alter their… Read more »

Scrolling
Guest
Scrolling

“YOU AINT GOT THE ANSWERS!”…And the author proved that in the introduction by confidently comparing apartheid to…hair. Apartheid is related to oppression and hate. When a group of “minorities” create a sector dedicated to very specific experiences that they share, it’s because they are not represented, so they do it themselves. They’re not creating support groups out of hate or intentions to oppress, but to uplift and inspire. Concepts such as apartheid tend to be the very reason why communities such as “team natural” exist among minority groups. Looser textured, non-black people are definitely natural if they don’t alter their… Read more »

Lana
Guest
Lana

Hahahahahaha! The Kanye reference killed me! A million thumbs up.

Scrolling
Guest
Scrolling

Lol Thank you!

Love
Guest
Love

HOW JC?! YOU AINT BEEN DOING THE EDUCATION!

Dee
Guest
Dee

Whenever black people try to have something to call their own it’s a problem. They want everything we have. Everything black culture they want to turn into white culture. Example look at how whenever ancient Egypt is portrayed it’s some white person or other ethnicity as if blacks folks weren’t even there. Look at Rock n Roll first we had Muddy Waters, chuck Berry, etc. but Elvis is the king of Rock n Roll. They will be doing the same with hip hop soon..our children will not know public enemy or tribe called quest, they will know the bestie boys… Read more »

Robin Spencer
Guest
Robin Spencer

This is a movement that is greatly need amongst black women. Our acceptance of our natural appearance is like no other our experience cannot be shared. We were encouraged to mirror the european look to beaccepted so no i dont think our new found freedom should be shared. Tjis something we as black women finally embraced and we should be proud.

Andria
Guest
Andria

Apartheid??!? Seriously?!!? WHEN EVER was a Caucasian woman stolen from her home in the middle of the night,imprisoned, beaten to death, electrocuted, shot, or denied employment because of her frizzy hair? I’ll wait.

Tammy
Guest
Tammy

JC, JC, JC. Do you really believe the words you wrote? Are you really comparing black women not wanting to be inundated with images of white women in spaces created by and for black women to…apartheid? Nobody is killing white women for being white. If you really want to compare this to apartheid (I don’t know WHY)-white women are trying to encroach on black women, so black women would be the victims as black women were here FIRST and white women are coming in acting like they belong and we need to make room for them and we’re wrong if… Read more »

jordann
Guest
jordann

damn I really liked this site but farewell!

Mkay
Guest
Mkay

For the first time in a long time women who identify with being Black are having a strong, positive global connection and are creating such a beautiful community of education and love for one another. But we’re racist because we want to bask in our (sadly, but finally) new-found appreciation for what’s been controversially targeted since the diaspora: our hair. This article implying that we’re racist is a sad attempt at trying to guilt us into feeling bad for people we don’t necessarily identify with. I can’t help that I feel more compelled to the likes of a kinky haired… Read more »

Trisha
Guest
Trisha

JC, I agree with you 100%.

Mehna
Guest
Mehna

Good attempt. “But, it ain’t gonna happen.”

T.
Guest
T.

First, the comparison to apartheid is SO WRONG. The whole #TeamNatural thing is not about depriving anyone of their basic human rights and social equality. You’re going in a Godwin’s Law kind of direction with that one. If you want acceptance [by the mainstream], you need to start accepting others into your clique Say what? I don’t think that the natural movement is about seeking acceptance from the mainstream. I don’t have time for a mainstream that doesn’t have time for me. I don’t need the mainstream (i.e. white people) to validate me. I really don’t care about white folks’… Read more »

OLLIE
Guest
OLLIE

Black women don’t own the word teamnatural so white women can use it if they want. However the writer is actually disgusting for comparing a blog about hair to Apartheid (because the killing of children for several years is the same thing as white people not being able to be one blog… ) If for example Asian women had a website built on SLANTED EYES the discrimination they faced, the surgery they had to subject themselves to so that they can be perceived as normal and POOF a white woman comes in and talks about her slanted eyes. Do you… Read more »

Scrolling
Guest
Scrolling

I completely agree. But, I feel it’s only a problem when Black people develop and execute groups for ourselves. We’re such a dispersed community of people that when we do gather, others peek over saying “What they got goin’ on over there?” God forbid we reestablish a strong sense of community similar to the pre-civil rights era.

Kroo213
Guest
Kroo213

Thumbs up if you suspected someone was going to come up with a sad excuse for a counter argument.

Ij
Guest
Ij

So excluding white people from the natural hair community is the equivalent of killing people and destroying families and people lives, being thrown in jail for no reason, not allowed to walk in certain places and not allowed to sit on a bus or use a public restroom and being forced to live in inhuman conditions?! Rightttttttt.… Nelson Mandela was arrested and thrown in prison for 27years for standing up against a government that was committing crimes against black South Africans and for encouraging his people to fight for freedom. When he came out of jail yes he forgave the… Read more »

Keshiiiii
Guest
Keshiiiii

I’m so agree with your comments. This article is so…dumb.

Martha
Guest
Martha

This is not about race, so those of you that want to take it that level show ignorance on your behalf. White women as well as hispanic women and mixed women can be apart of the natural hair community and movement as well. The majority of naturals ruin the natural hair movement by thinking that you’re the only ones that can be natural just because you’re black. Get over yourselves. You have to make everything a dang competition. At some point you had straight hair when your original texture may have been wavy or curly no one told you that… Read more »

Tanya Andrade
Guest
Tanya Andrade

“White women as well as Hispanic women and mixed women can be apart of the natural hair community and movement as well. The majority of naturals ruin the natural hair movement by thinking that you’re the only ones that can be natural just because you’re black.” The fundamental mistake that you and others are making to include women of other races in the ‘natural’ hair movement is interpreting the movement solely based on the term ‘natural.’ Yes, it is true, technically, anyone, regardless of race, can be ‘natural.’ In fact, the term ‘natural’ is actually an inaccurate term to describe… Read more »

Martha
Guest
Martha

Just in case people are wonder I am mixed race. The statement I made may have sounded like I was pointing the finger at black women. Instead of using “you”, I should have said us. I didn’t mean it in a rude way when I said “get over yourselves.” I felt that I spoke on the behalf of those who are targeted as not being natural simply because they are of a different race. I feel that being natural should include every race and be fair to them also, because then it seems as though they’re being discriminated against as… Read more »

anastasia
Guest
anastasia

@ Martha
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/hilariouswhiteanongif_blackkids_whitepplpretendingtobeblack.gif[/img]

Martha
Guest
Martha

If that was your way of saying I’m a white girl trapped inside of a black girl’s body then all I can say to you is grow the heck up. You’re an adult or maybe a child by the looks of this photo. Black teenager(by the way) to “adult” that shows how mature you are. Close mindedness gets you no where.

#Adoseofreality
Guest
#Adoseofreality

Close mindedness gets you nowhere.” Tell that to the Whites who have always excluded and continue to exclude anyone who doesn’t look like them. (Hint: Black people don’t look like White people).

Bean
Guest
Bean

Amen. What’s funny is that all of these silly idiots think they actually have the “power” to exclude anyone from claiming anything lol…all of these ignorant behind comments have ZERO control over which woman can claim being natural. I’m pretty sure any white woman, mixed woman, whatever color woman who is currently natural will not be losing any sleep or running to grab any chemicals to put in their hair, because a bunch of bitter, black chicks are throwing temper tantrums about not being the only race with women who are indeed natural. Lol. Smh. So sad…

#Adoseofreality
Guest
#Adoseofreality

ROTFLMFAO. What’s sad is that you and those like you have to resort to name-calling and insults because you can’t seem to get your thick skulls out of your rectums long enough to actually think critically. Yeah. You’re not the only one who can throw around insults, sweetie. Believe it or not, the mere fact that the natural hair movement has become as popular as it has (and has significantly influenced major companies/industries and evidently tens of thousands of non-black women) is direct testimony and proof of just HOW MUCH power Black women have. And considering how many White women… Read more »

Prettydarkskinnedgirl
Guest
Prettydarkskinnedgirl

Or like that saying goes: don’t raise your voice, improve your argument!

flouncingtart
Guest
flouncingtart

“Bitter black chicks.” This says everything about you and nothing about those of us who are trying so hard to explain why #teamnatural isn’t for white women. As someone who is mixed race, I still have deep brown skin and afro-textured 4a and 4b hair and the stigmas that come with that. I am a mixed woman, I am a black woman. And as a mixed race woman of afro-descent, I’m telling you that you need to take several seats and stop using my identity for your false equivalences and ignorance. I don’t need you to defend my space in… Read more »

Martha
Guest
Martha

Okay my apology I completely misread the article. Sorry to anyone who was offended.

sowhatwhocares
Guest
sowhatwhocares

majority of people are offended

Martha
Guest
Martha

Okay and that is why I apologized. 🙂

silkynaps
Guest
silkynaps

Comparing apartheid to hair is like…
Well, someone stole my pad thai out of the office fridge. I’m pretty sure that’s what slavery was like.

Temi
Guest
Temi

It is absolutely not true that every black woman can identify with a journey to self love, some of us can’t. Some of us actually grew up being told that we were beautiful as we are and our hair was beautiful as it is. It is a very myopic point of view to think that black people as a collective have the same journey, we don’t, we are individuals” — my favourite part and the point I was trying to make in the other article!!

toni
Guest
toni

Perhaps, in your household, but the media and western culture has always made clear that black hair is not beautiful. And judging by the millions of black women that wear weaves as a lifestyle(not hairstyle), many black girls were not told they are beautiful as is.

Scarlet
Guest
Scarlet

Maybe growing up you never left your house?

O
Guest
O

Trying to be funny?

Have you seen the doll experiment with White and Black girls?

If you have you will be aware that the duty of a Black parent is to raise the self-esteem of their daughters so they grow up knowing Black is beautiful and no-one has the right to treat you like a second class citizen.

Finn
Guest
Finn

You’re right. We are individuals, and we do not all share the same experience. Our point is that when somebody glances at you on the streets here in the US, they don’t care about where you’re from or your experiences. They just see a Black person, and that’s enough for quite a few people to come to a conclusion. If you do not identify with the movement, nor understand why it isn’t for anyone but those who are of Black and African descent, you are more then welcome to NOT be a part of the celebration of our aesthetic. It… Read more »

not_naya
Guest
not_naya

I want to know why as black people everyone, including some of our own black people take us for fools. I think the writer wants us to feel guilty for not being “inclusive” of others in the natural hair movement but I don’t feel guilty at all. Sorry but your post made me think that natural hair and all it’s issue could never be understood by any other race, and I wished that black people can own something for once without “being bullied” that we must share… I don’t think that was Jc’s intent when she submitted this to be… Read more »

Naturalbeauty
Guest
Naturalbeauty

I ABSOLUTELY agree. Who bullies “them” into accepting Black women? Nobody, That’s why this Natural Hair Community is so beautiful. It was started by black women, FOR BLACK WOMEN, so that we can finally start to embrace and love the one thing about us that Ias been ridiculed, mocked and degraded since…well…forever. this community makes a statement that Black women FINALLY don’t give a damn about what white America/mainstream think of our hair. We love our hair and are committed to nuturing it and taking care of it as God intended. Now, like EVERYTHING else on the planet, white folks… Read more »

Prettydarkskinnedgirl
Guest
Prettydarkskinnedgirl

*playing world’s tiniest violin right now for them & their exclusion struggle
#byeFelicia!

cnj
Guest
cnj

Yes to this! We are always asked to forget our history and change ourselves to make others feel included or make them feel comfortable. It seems like black people happily oblige others. However, no other race is ever asked to consider our struggle or to recognize that our history is different. They are just allowed to take and do whatever they want and black people just have to shut up and take it. We need to stop allowing people to act like our stories, our history, our struggles don’t exist or matter.

April
Guest
April

The apartheid comparison is very far reaching. I don’t think white women or anyone should be excluded from the information about black hair care if they want to learn how to care for their black adopted, or bi-racial children. But a white woman’s difficulty and struggle with her curly or frizzy hair just doesn’t compare to a black woman’s search for self-love and appreciation in a world where her hair, her body, her intelligence weren’t seen as sexy, appealing, necessary, or valid for donkey years. Come on.

Authorshoulddrinkbleach
Guest
Authorshoulddrinkbleach

So let me get this right: First, Black women and our hair (and most other features) are excluded from representation in the mainstream. Second, Black women beg to be included and it either falls on deaf ears or we are called insecure and jealous for even wanting it. Third, we decide forget it then, we’ll create our own space where we can finally be represented. And now, white women, who had no problem with and never spoke up about our exclusion from mainstream/popular spaces, are whining about being it being unfair that they are excluded in the singular space we… Read more »

Prettydarkskinnedgirl
Guest
Prettydarkskinnedgirl

While I don’t agree with Jc’s viewpoint, there’s no reason to be disrespectful or mean-spirited. Let’s not forget how much valuable information we’ve all gotten from the author in the past. We’re all entitled to our various opinions & this was meant to spark open conversation & debate so that we could see each side of the argument & learn from each other; we can disagree respectfully though. It’s possible that some of the more eloquent comments will change her mind or at least show her why we all feel the way we do.
That is all

Nope
Guest
Nope

No. I don’t agree. What was said in that post needed to be said and it needed to be said forcefully. “NO! You cannot have the movement that we created because of your exclusionary and harmful media/propaganda and how it hurts Black women and girls’ self esteem”. “NO! We will not allow you to co-opt and take over another thing that we have created and then pretend you were the ones who made it all along”. And “NO! We will not allow you to tone police us into complacency and to slowly erode away at our resolve”

cacey
Guest
cacey

i can’t agree with you here, JC. sounds like a play for devil’s advocate on this one. i would argue that the reason why white people and black people have the negative views they do toward curly and kinky hair types is because of white people. they created this monster. they have ample healing to undergo on their own, to be sure, but that’s why there’s all sorts of spaces out there that are theirs alone. not every space is for everybody, and there’s nothing wrong with that. that’s the great thing about the internet. if we go with your… Read more »

Recent Grad
Guest
Recent Grad

For these “curly” women desiring inclusion in the Natural Hair movement: Please get back to us when you are harassed in the workplace, or your daughter is harassed by school administrators, for your/her 3a-3c hair. Or when it is considered “unclean,” “unkempt,” or “unprofessional” for being in its natural state, to the point when your job is in jeopardy. Ever wear a wig to a job interview because you were afraid you wouldn’t be offered the job if you wore your “natural” hair, regardless of how educated or qualified you were? Let us know if your 3a-3c friends experience any… Read more »

Prettydarkskinnedgirl
Guest
Prettydarkskinnedgirl

Have you been talking to Adoseofreality? Lol
You both make similar points equally well-expressed

Deb
Guest
Deb

The difference between the comments/reaction on this website and curlynikki’s site are pretty staggering.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

I think that the experience of African Americans should be respected. You may not have had their struggle but that is not something that should be marginalized or deprecated. They are the one’s that spearheaded the natural hair movement for which, I personally am thankful ( I am not AA). It takes courage to love your hair and I respect the courage in the “movement”. We should have our space because every other space is not our own. The cry of “natural nazis” and “exclusionary” is an attempt to destabilize a worthwhile cause and we should resist it fiercely. Because… Read more »

Deb
Guest
Deb

Oh I completely agree! I actually made a similar comment on curlynikki’s website. Not sure why I was downvoted numerously for making an observation.

flouncingtart
Guest
flouncingtart

I think people assumed you were making a negative judgment about the comments here in comparison.

Prettydarkskinnedgirl
Guest
Prettydarkskinnedgirl

Curlynikki’s site is now owned by a white corporation…

Kb
Guest
Kb

Thank you JC! And thank God I grew up in a Black Country, because I can not with the African American mentality

Roo
Guest
Roo

Me too!! I think these over the top reactions can only be understood by african americans. As an african currently living in the UK this over reaction astounds me. People have a right to call themselves natural if they want and hence teamnatural.

#Adoseofreality
Guest
#Adoseofreality

Smh, I have the good mind to reach through my laptop and e‑slap you across your face. Are you high or what? Classic cases of Africans who are born into (and don’t recognize their) Black Privilege and lack empathy for Blacks who aren’t. You and Kb need to speak for yourselves and ONLY yourselves, because I and several other born-and-bred Africans from all over the continent both understand and SHARE these so-called “over the top reactions.” Our natural hair (esp Kinky) is still very much shunned by the majority of other Africans, even who have never even stepped foot out… Read more »

Kb
Guest
Kb
Kb
Guest
Kb
juanicole617
Guest
juanicole617

Roo, please answer me this question. Why do you believe most Black women across the world were relaxing their hair? Please share your opinion.

maralondon
Guest
maralondon

I believe that the fact you are astounded by the reactions to this topic has nothing to do with you living in the UK. I’m also from the UK, was born and raised there. I constantly got teased by white children and adults about my hair and if it wasn’t my hair it’d be the colour of my skin or some other physical feature. Thank god for me i grew up with black pride and never really experienced negativity from other black people regarding wearing my hair natural hair and i’ve been natural for some 20 years now. But i… Read more »

Ada
Guest
Ada

The late Fela Kuti (and his Pan-African contemporaries) will disagree with you about the need for exclusive spaces.

Never mind that Black countries have their own issues left over from colonialism. People will look at you sideways if you wear your hair out the way God made it, but relaxers are selling in the village market for kobo, cents, centimes, pesewa by the case… *kiss teeth*

ebony
Guest
ebony

I do not want to insult you. But I will. I GREW UP IN THE BLACKEST BLACKEST COUNTRY IN THE WORLD. NIGERIA. Ever heard of it? If you think we are far removed from the racial experiences of African American…then I cannot blame you BUT THE FAILED EDUCATION SYSTEM MANY AFRICAN COUNTRIES ARE REPUTED TO HAVING. Natural HAIR MOVEMENT IS FOR BLACK WOMEN. It is not RACIST. Say, you have a home don’t you? I will use caps. If you like think I am shouting. But I want these words to linger in your eyeballs. IF YOU HAVE A HOME,… Read more »

Recent Grad
Guest
Recent Grad

Oh thank God — you get it! I was beginning to wonder if the sisters from the continent were asleep at the wheel. My friend from Burundi who lives here in the States agrees with you about the African educational system failing them, with regards to CONTEXT in African-American, Afro-Caribbean, and Afro-Latin American history. Many Africans just don’t get it, and insult what they don’t understand. The legacy of colonialism is real, people! If anyone doubts it, look at the growing rate of bleaching cream use in places like Jamaica, India and Nigeria. When will we accept that we are… Read more »

Temi
Guest
Temi

@ebony OMG just STOP pleeeaaassseee!!! STOP trying to act like we are the same! WE ARE NOT THE SAME!!! Literally every historian will tell you that the plight of African Americans is UNIQUE to them. No other group in the world can claim to understand what they have gone through because no other group has gone through it — regardless of skin colour. Yes Nigeria was colonised by the British — but so was India, Australia, Egypt, New Zealand, Jamaica etc and none of these countries have got chips on their shoulders and go around shouting “we hate white people”.… Read more »

maralondon
Guest
maralondon

AAs are not the only people who do not know where they come from. have you tried asking the average Caribbean person that question? You know very little of the colonisation of India, Australia or New Zealand. Even today there are Aboriginal and Maori people fighting against the racist system the British put in place to keep these people down, same in the Caribbean. Go and read some real news instead of the propaganda rubbish made up by the British.

Temi
Guest
Temi

I honestly do not care about the history of all those places. It still doesn’t take away from the point i’m trying to make, which is that we — Africans and Black Americans — are not the same. Simple. The only thing we share is the colour of our skin. Isn’t it even true that most black americans are mixed with white and native american? So even genetically we’re not even the same.

Dananana
Guest
Dananana

You’re right, Temi. AAs and people from the continent are not the same. AAs and Caribbeans are not the same. AAs and Brits are not the same. Our collective cultures are all very different; even southern AAs are very different from eastern, western, northern, and midwestern AA… nobody’s monolithic. But we all have shared experiences and because we were (are) colonized and oppressed. I’m having trouble understanding why you are trying so hard to distance yourself from people who share a lot of history with you. And also, this won’t be popular, but a LOT of Africans have snippets and… Read more »

ebony
Guest
ebony

WRONG. They never accepted my natural hair. NEVER. It is now growing in Nigeria. Are you in Nigeria?

Prettydarkskinnedgirl
Guest
Prettydarkskinnedgirl

You had me at “and I am starting to understand the argument for a space that is their own”! The rest is tangential to the main point which is being able to see both sides of the argument. For me, this isn’t about beating one another over the head with our opinions but sharing viewpoints. I’m interested to know WHY the few that agree with the author do agree with her & I want the author & those who share her opinion to be open to understanding why some of us don’t agree. Uh oh now! We just might learn… Read more »

maralondon
Guest
maralondon

Temi, you sound very ignorant. You were the one who brought up India Australia and all those other Countries that had been colonised by the British and stated something that is not true.

Trini
Guest
Trini

You should be able to decipher from my “name” that I grew up in a “black’ country as well. So, like you I can relate to being in the majority and seeing those who looked like me in leadership positions, though we had other races represented as well. Now kindly don’t consider this as a personal attack, but I think if you understood what African-Americans have had to endure you would have a different perspective on what you’ve termed the “African American mentality.” I think I qualify as a credible speaker having lived in the U.S. for the last 26… Read more »

maralondon
Guest
maralondon

Trini, all slavery was beyond inhumane whether by the Portuguese, Dutch, British, French or Spanish. The very notion of kidnapping a people from their land and forcing them into slave labour. Being treated less then animals. Please read the book ‘To Shoot Hard Labour’. It is an account of the life of an Antiguan man post Slavery on the Island. There were similar laws in place to prevent our ancestors from total freedom and being in control of their own destiny. We were still at the mercy of the white man many years past slavery. I’ve often asked my grandfather,… Read more »

Trini
Guest
Trini

It is unfortunate about your grandfather. However, I don’t think that you caught the gist or the main idea of my comments; they were not meant to categorize slavery as being more or less severe in any one region. The individual to whom I was responding mentioned the “African American mentality.” My comments were therefore meant to explain the root behind her perception of that mentality. If you want to take the slavery issue and run with it, enjoy the marathon. There is no need for me to read additional material on its effects as I am well aware of… Read more »

maralondon
Guest
maralondon

You did in your 3rd paragraph state that ‘it is a known fact that slavery in the U.S. was beyond inhumane when compared to other areas of the Americas’. I simply responded in order to correct you. I mentioned my grandfather in order to highlight the mentality of many people of African descent across the globe. We are still clutching onto the Willie Lynch Syndrome and believe that everything Europeans do and say has more substance than what our own brothers and sisters do and say. Ever hear of Dwight York? He’s a famous ex football(soccer) player from Trinidad who… Read more »

la*belle
Guest
la*belle

I agree wholeheartedly. Some of these comments.…
Some women who follow the water only or sebum only methods, irrespective of race, nationality, etc. call themselves natural. And rightly so, they have not altered their hair in any way. Calling them natural doesn’t minimise my hair journey,experiences in any way. I think some of the feelings expressed here are borne out of something else.

Evachuba
Guest
Evachuba

They are considered natural But they are not a part of the natural hair movement. Going natural for mainstream America is not the same as being on a natural hair journey. Natural hair journey implies acceptance of an overall beauty that has been consistently marginalized by society. So a white woman using her urine to wash her hair has not been taught to hate her skin, nose, hips, and even hair. She is just using urine. Get my drift. Using urine or acv rinse or butter or wine or beer or whatever is using a natural product not being on… Read more »

BeautyIAM
Guest
BeautyIAM

No offense, but please shut up. How dare you. I really can’t with non black Americans. As a Nigerian-American, I am sick of this holier than thou mentality that exists with people like you.

flouncingtart
Guest
flouncingtart

I’m from one of the blackest countries in the Caribbean…explain to me why skin bleaching is an epidemic? Explain to me why I’m seen as brave for embracing my natural hair? You really think the African American mentality is so different from people of African descent from around the globe, especially when all of us have similar experiences struggling with our identity?

Lupita Nyong’o, one of the most high profile Africans in the media right now, would respectfully disagree with your assessment if her speech about her blackness and her beauty is anything to go by.

Menna
Guest
Menna

I think I will just stop with this blog all together because this article is a joke. #teamnatural is for black women, and black women only. full stop.

cnj
Guest
cnj

Wow this is a sad sad article. I’m so happy the comments ripped this piece of crap article apart.

Midwestnija
Guest
Midwestnija

The comparison used in this article is ignorant. In creating a space to talk about the beauty of a specific type of hair, black people are being no more racist than any other outlet that focuses on a specific type of hair. In the comments for the other article, it was mentioned that virtually every popular fashion magazine includes almost no black people as fashion icons. And if a black person is mentioned (never featured), then they have hair that is chemically or thermally altered or is in a weave. Are we now saying that when this excluded group of… Read more »

Leesha
Guest
Leesha

Good post.

Yo Yo
Guest
Yo Yo

It was nice to see this writer’s point of view. I can definitely say that I am getting irritated with all this talk about who can be allowed in and who is not welcomed. When I started my hair journey back to a chemical-free state for the fourth time I was pleasantly surprised that this time around there is plenty of information available online (websites, forums, youtube, blogs, vlogs, entire product lines, etc.). Since many black women and other women of color have some experience with racism, prejudice, bigotry, stereotypes, why would any of us turn around and do it… Read more »

ebony
Guest
ebony

Better than what? Stop being a white apologist. Always trying to force black women to swallow their anger and their disgust. Where were your white friends when young black girls were thrown out of schools? Where were your white friend when my friend got fired from her law firm because she decided to go natural and they did not feel that nappy hair coincided with the direction of the law firm? And mind there were curly white women working there. We are better than the intrusion of white women in our spaces. They have mainstream media they should suck on… Read more »

La Bandita
Guest
La Bandita

Her husband is White.

merry
Guest
merry

Lol at this article. This nonsense is really shaking the wheat from the shaft though.

Deedeemaha
Guest
Deedeemaha

JC must have thought she was in a UK Science Lab, cause she has started a fireeer up in here! And she got 3 degree comment burns up in here. Lol.

These comments have BURN so bad she must have nerve damage, cause I only saw one reply from her. I think some good points for consideration have been made. I would like to here her response to some of the questions if it’s not to much scar damage.

Finn
Guest
Finn

“If you want acceptance, you need to start accepting others into your clique otherwise why should they care about your stories, how would they see their poignancy and relevance?” Considering that Black spaces bare made by necessity and not by choice, I would think that changes the game. It’s not like we willingly divided into two cliques and are now warring it out like a scene outta West Side Story. Mainstream society and culture has ALWAYS put us in a corner and forgot about us. When we asked for representation, we were handed a few crumbs at best. So, the… Read more »

guest
Guest
guest

Let me tell why I don’t believe the bs that it is hard for a curly haired white women to understand our struggle with our kinky coily hair as black women…there are plenty of hair commercials that are clearly aimed at white woman that encourage “gorgeous” curls “elegant”..if curly hair wasn’t accepted why would they use these adjectives towards the “unacceptable” hair type. As a matter of fact any time a new white celebrity comes on the scene with curly hair the are almost instantly made an icon, and numerous hair articles and what not on how to achieve their… Read more »

Kellee Blue
Guest
Kellee Blue

GTFOH…this article is such a Strrrrretttttttchhh. Stop trying to include people who do not include you. Next thing you know blondes will say THEY started the natural hair movement and we’ll be sitting here reading it in their history books. Can we please stop lining-up to give our culture away?? #annoyed

Gen
Guest
Gen

Seriously? Do you even understand the sociological concept of racism. This is basic. People who have been and still continue to be systematically subjugated by the dominant race CANNOT BE RACIST. They might be prejudiced. They might be able to practice discrimination (though this is oftentimes pretty rare), but they can’t be racist!!! Not to mention there are no systems in place that seek to subjugate white people at large. Why can’t people understand this BASIC concept? And why should black women make any attempt to include white women in our struggle to FINALLY accept and love ourselves. White women… Read more »

Shanta Fabulous
Guest
Shanta Fabulous

I don’t think we HAVE to be inclusive. I think we can be but it’s not a must. I don’t think we have to attack every non-black person who wants to be part of the community but there’s nothing wrong with being wary. There’s nothing wrong with wanting them to be in the background for awhile. There are too many instances of black people thinking a non-black person is for them only to find out when certain issues pop up they are not. If we were only talking about hair maybe I’d feel different but these spaces are about more… Read more »

User5-6919
Guest
User5-6919

“If we were only talking about hair maybe I’d feel different but these spaces are about more than hair to me.” I think that’s the main point many of us need to really highlight in our comments. I honestly thought when I saw CurlyNikki and I saw a picture of her, she looked LIKE me. By extension, when I saw the women on the site, I thought it would be catering to the African aesthetic of natural afro hair, which may be braids, etc. In the previous article on BGLH that I commented on, I got thumbs-downed because I said… Read more »

Ms. Vee
Guest
Ms. Vee

This article is so pitiful I have to laugh. I’m not angry but highly amused and somewhat disturbed. In this place we aint got time for the white apologists that want to equate our right to exclusion (after being marginalized) to apartheid. Any yet our exclusion of who represents Afro-textured/coily hair has oppressed no one. I will not elaborate any further. Enough wise and conscious sistahs see the BS and have laid it out. I will simply declare this article a pathetic troll piece that should’ve not been displayed here. Remember ladies trolls/haters mean progress. *moves on and waits for… Read more »

Almonddimplew
Guest
Almonddimplew

As I read this article I was amused it was one sided and lack substance as a black one with natural hair that is of a loose curl pattern I could remember as a child my white school teachers your hair is beautiful its silky and soft just like mine how did u get hair like that. I now know they were ignorant just like you

Bean
Guest
Bean

@Almonddimplew Thank you. *claps*

jay923
Guest
jay923

Totally agree with you JC. I personally found the other article to be ridiculous. And I’m so tired of hearing about mainstream media being the cause of us not accepting our selves. Corporation are in the business of making money so they give the people what they want. And what we wanted was straight hair and weaves. Now that we as consumers are demanding natural hair products that is what we’re seeing in the market no one is trying to take over our industry it’s business as usual. And to say that there are no natural black women on television… Read more »

AnaDion
Guest
AnaDion

*clapclapclap* I am a bit tired of hearing about how white culture is repressing us and causing us to hate ourselves and that the natural hair movement is us overturning that hatred. Any shade thrown my way regarding my Blackness has come from the Black community (you’re too light skinned, you got that good hair, you don’t act black etc. etc. etc.) and my going natural was about me realizing that I had no understanding of my true texture and wanting to learn more about myself. Society can hate you but it can’t make you hate yourself. Also, people keep… Read more »

Finn
Guest
Finn

Also @AnaDion, considering we’ve been hating ourselves (because if somebody treats you like crap enough, you tend to believe you deserve it. That’s Psych 101, come on now) through most of Slavery, Reconstruction, Segregation, Jim Crow/Civil Rights , and present day.…I’d say we are not going to stop having self-hate issues overnight. But the natural hair movement is an attempt to fix that within our community, which is why the focus should be us. the Black, African community NEEDS to address this issue themselves. Besides, at least Black folks say it to you. White society does not have to, they… Read more »

AnaDion
Guest
AnaDion

I actually agree with about 95% of what you just said. Anti-Black sentiment started with White people but was carried within the Black community and is something that now has to be fixed internally. And, I’ll admit that the “get over sentiment” is neither realistic nor sensitive. However, as we’ve agreed that it is something that needs to be fixed within ourselves, it does not seem viable to continue to label White People the problem. The source, perhaps, but at some point we have to stop giving others the power to create hate within ourselves. That’s the natural hair movement-… Read more »

Hannah
Guest
Hannah

What inbred wrote this? This is SO STUPID! White chicks can never ever be part of the natural hair movement EVER. The natural hair movement is especially made to contradict eurocentric standards of beauty, how can white girls be part of a movement that is against them? Does that even make sense? What the actual hell is wrong with BGLH why did they even post this up? AND DID YOU SERIOUSLY JUST REFERENCE APARTHEID IN SUCH A WHACK WAY?

watermeloneekwa
Guest
watermeloneekwa

White women need to go to hell with that mess, How dare they even post this bull up?As far as I’m concerned CN is useless bitch as they come and is just a sell out of the worst kind.

As for the beautiful women of African heritage we shall keep making this our own, with no interruptions from whitey. IF they want to view us as “racist” then oh well, then I guess I’m the black Archie Bunker up in this B!

Finn
Guest
Finn

What kind of annoys me about rebuttal posts like this is that you don’t know what you’re talking about, nor do you try to. -They’re a money business, but I honestly don’t think you understands what that really means. They do not give the consumer what they want: In the case of Black media, it’s actually the opposite. Black television/magazines (and hair companies) are white-owned, usually. On the topic of Black Hair care, about 80% of these niche market companies are white-owned, 20% are owned and operated by us. -A lot of the positive things we want to see, would… Read more »

Lauren
Guest
Lauren

Your comment needs to rebuttal in itself. It’s much deeper than hair that blind people can’t seem to understand. There’s an entire history behind it. Well said.

Finn
Guest
Finn

@Laura
The bad part about it is that is literally as easy as opening another tab and googling it themselves.

If they think we’re being wrong, why is it nobody can come with proof?
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/tumblr_lzw7cnzgqa1qlcs90o1_400.gif[/img]

jay923
Guest
jay923

Thank you for correcting me a bout the inventor of the relaxer. You are correct for some reason I was thinking about Madam C.J. Walker when I was writing the original post. Now let me address a few points in your essay : ) First I am well aware that the majority of black hair care companies are owned by white corporations. The color of the owners skin does not change the basic rules of economics.. supply and demand. The demand for relaxers went down creating a decrease in profits to fix the drop in revenue and remain profitable you… Read more »

nichelle
Guest
nichelle

One thing “black” american women should learn or practice is to focus on themselves without apologizing. They should question why it is their responsiblity / job to teach non-blacks and adult males about “natural hair.” I am so tired of black women having to do the teach and inform because more often than not it is the same power dynamics at play. If you are a non-black and /or male and are interested in learning about natural hair…there are many resources available today regarding the matter. If you want to reflect on your awakening or enlightenment please start a blog… Read more »

#shegonlearntoday
Guest
#shegonlearntoday

When a white person wants to really bully or tease a white curly about her hair they tell her she has an “AFRO”! “YOU GOT NEGRO HAIR” “IS THAT A JHERRI CURL?” All references to having “the worst hair”, black natural hair! Spare me the nonsense about white curlies being teased because they have 3b ringlets; so they can relate to our black plight for acceptance of what we’re born with? Its not the curly cues and spirals they’re ashamed of, its the implications of having any relations to negro hair. Now that we’ve settled into a state of our… Read more »

Darlyn
Guest
Darlyn

Exactly!

Prettydarkskinnedgirl
Guest
Prettydarkskinnedgirl

Me likey this! You summed up all 242 & counting comments in a nice, neat, little paragraph & I am here for it!

anecine
Guest
anecine

i know right! I wanted to read all of them but some of these comments are like their own blogs. That was eveything that needed to be said. No more, no less.

kitso
Guest
kitso

Well said gal. Couldnt have said it better. Often when i read topics like the one ou are responding to i always think what kind of world is America, honestly im curious because what is projected in these articles is deep touching but appalling sometimes. I wish i could understand how human beings can be so emotional to the point of hating others so because of hair. I really want to understand because i do not get it at all.Growing up in Africa we never bothererd about hair, in fact most ordinary families like mine still are not. Girls get… Read more »

#Adoseofreality
Guest
#Adoseofreality

Please, just STOP with all that #bullshit. I’m getting really tired of some of you African girls claiming to be clueless about the significance of natural hair and what embracing it means worldwide. And please, for the love of everything green, SPECIFY which COUNTRY in Africa you are from. You’re only encouraging the ignoramuses (who, in my experience, are mostly White Americans) who really think Africa is some homogenous village in the middle of the Earth to continue thinking that way when you make that generalization. And before I go any further, I am Cameroonian (West-Central African) and have also… Read more »

#Adoseofreality
Guest
#Adoseofreality

I also forgot (in my irritation at the SHEER obtuseness Kitso and a few others like her are exhibiting) to add: Look through ANY of the uncountable Nollywood (Nigerian) and Ghanaian movies and TV series (especially those of you who are subscribed to DStv) and tell me HOW MANY of the women you see are wearing their natural hair at ANY length. Go on, tell me. By all means, scour YouTube if you need to. There are plenty of uploads there as well. So many of the weaves and wigs you see these women wearing have to be the most… Read more »

Zedzed
Guest
Zedzed

I wish I could thumbs up your comment a million times. The ignorance from most of my African sisters on this blog is amazing. I am Nigerian and natural hair for anybody out of secondary school is seen as ugly (except you go to some weird church where relaxers are forbidden). If the AA’s hadn’t made natural hair attractive today and showed us the options we can have we would still be relaxing our hair.

#Adoseofreality
Guest
#Adoseofreality

Girl, abeg, don’t even get me started on some of these White-washed Africans, happily running around and embarrassing their ancestors and the rest of us who can actually think for ourselves. Smh. Straight-up self-hate, willful ignorance, and raw denial flows through their veins, and the saddest part is that they can’t (and refuse to) see, acknowledge, or accept it. Most never even stop to ask themselves why the general mind-set here is that a “yellow” (read light-skinned) woman “deserves” a higher bride-price than a dark-skinned woman. Never mind that the majority of us, are in fact, dark-skinned. So many just… Read more »

Aico
Guest
Aico

God bless you for this. I want to slap the taste out of the mouths of our fellow Africans that pretend these issues do not exist at home so they can pretend to be superior to others in the diaspora.

Candace
Guest
Candace

I have to disagree there. I’ve lived in more than 15 countries in Africa and in every one the majority of women were rocking long silky weaves or had their hair chemically straightened. It was so rare for me to to see the short cut or natural hair look on a woman that it always caught my attention. Women with weaves and perms who knew me would definitely compliment my beautiful natural hair and tell me that I looked like a “real” African beauty with my twists, afro, or twistouts. But if I went to say, the airport, the women… Read more »

juanicole617
Guest
juanicole617

Kitso, it’s not just about hair. Read the pro-exclusive comments and it has been explained over and over again. This is a self identity crisis among many Black women. This is about a group of Black women globally accepting what was deemed unattractive. Curls were always considered attractive. Please look deeper into the reason why most Black women all over this world were relaxing and then now the boom of the natural hair movement.

anecine
Guest
anecine

how is hair any different than skin. you act like its so unimportant and in a perfect world it would be, but in the real world things like skin color and hair matter. i would expect you of all people to know that…

kitso
Guest
kitso

oh and by the way here in Germany, TV ads, H&M, C&A , AWG and lots others have blacks with natural hair no straight hair.

cnj
Guest
cnj

Same in United States… Your point?

Nana
Guest
Nana

As an African living in America I totally get the need for exclusivity and I’m not here for this obtuseness. I can walk down 125th street right now and a slew of my people will chase me down because my hair isn’t “done”. Spare us. We are coming along but we are far from being removed from this issue. Globally black women need each other and we need to support each other. If you don’t get it then take some time to understand it.

Robin
Guest
Robin

I’m not surprised that the vast majority of comments are negative. I don’t agree with most of the negative comments, and a lot of the comments make me sigh and shake my head (and yes, I’m a black woman with natural kinky coily hair), but I’m not surprised the comments exist. Yes, I do think the apartheid comparison is a bit much. But I do understand where the article author’s coming from. Is this really what “the natural hair community” is about? Exclusivity? Ignoring the fact that some white women have indeed gotten relaxers to “tame” their curly frizzy hair?… Read more »

Apartheid
Guest
Apartheid

Thank you for stopping.

Dananana
Guest
Dananana

UHAHAJJHAVJHVHGV! I’m tired of people boohooing that the people who oppose the viewpoint presented in this article are trying to exclude “mixed” people or Black people with loose hair. I believe the general consensus of the opposition to this article is that ANY women who can claim ties to the African diaspora are welcome in the NHM, so stop warping the issue. Furthermore, nobody has a problem with White women listening and learning from our spaces–we just don’t feel they need representation because they have sole representation from so many other platforms. Why the hell can’t we have our own… Read more »

Bean
Guest
Bean

Very well put. I was absolutely appalled reading most of these comments. I can’t believe all of the anger and hatred behind some of these women’s words…it’s astonishing, sad, but yet comical. How could anyone be so freaking upset about HAIR?! Lol. It’s obvious to me their anger is really somewhere else. I just cannot picture myself saying to anyone “oh, you can’t join our club, because you’re not black enough and your hair is not nappy enough…sorry”. Pure stupidity.

BeautyIAM
Guest
BeautyIAM

How could anyone be so freaking upset about HAIR?!”

And there it is. You clearly don’t understand that for many, it is MORE THAN JUST HAIR. Did you know that there was a tobacco product in the US called “Ni**** Hair?”

http://www.stonegateantiques.net/items/590007/item590007store.html

So before you go on about how its just hair, you and everyone else that says that need to take a look into history and see how black hair was constantly vilified.

Bean
Guest
Bean

Bye Felicia.

Prettydarkskinnedgirl
Guest
Prettydarkskinnedgirl

I understand what you’re trying to say. I understand what Jc is trying to say. It doesn’t change my mind. There are indeed some white women who struggle with hair that isn’t the ideal & my heart bleeds for them (they should try dealing with that struggle hair while also being black) & I’m sure they want a forum where they can commiserate with folks in their boat who know that it’s real in these frizzy streets; those folks just happen to not be us! We can understand their struggle but they can’t understand ours which means this just ain’t… Read more »

Sabrina Antoinnette < link to instagram profile
Guest

People. Are. Crazy.… Racism, exclusivity, and all that jazz is not okay no matter what — nor is it okay from either side. We go natural and are proud of it to SUPPORT DIVERSITY, not to create another avenue for racism or exclusion. SMDH at the ignorance in all of this. The article made extremely valid points and was created to make us think… NOT act a damn fool lol.

la*belle
Guest
la*belle

Yep, Jc was unafraid to discuss the other side of the coin. I admire that.

Prettydarkskinnedgirl
Guest
Prettydarkskinnedgirl

Playing devil’s advocate on this particular topic makes her very brave; wrong…but brave

Bean
Guest
Bean

Agreed.

Bean
Guest
Bean

A lot of you sound sadly ridiculous. I had no idea so many women take this natural hair thing so deep. I have natural hair, because I prefer HEALTHY hair and chemicals in my hair just do not work for me. My being natural has nothing to do with self-love/hate, embracing this or that, or showing white America anything. Lol I can’t believe some of the things you people are saying. Wow. I totally agree with this post…natural hair is NOT just for black women. Sorry. NATURAL means just that…rocking your hair in it’s natural state, free of any damaging… Read more »

Nana
Guest
Nana

Wanna know something funny? I work in a field where I’ve come into contact with many Native Americans that still have a deep-rooted issues regarding colonialism. Would you tell them to “let that sh*t go”? That’s some insensitive b.s. and down right disrespectful. You think Jewish people have let go of the Holocaust? Please. I’m glad you are so above it all. Shout outs to you! In the mean time instead of talking nonsense on the surface level how about you actually try to understand where people are coming from. Obviously natural hair can pertain to anyone. The point is… Read more »

Finn
Guest
Finn

The only ridiculous sound person here is you and the rest of the Black/biracial folks who “don’t see race”, yet stand to be the most mistreated by employers/media/police forces. And considering you’re also Native American.…I would think you would be at least a little more “aware” of just how race factors into a person’s treatment in America. Oh well. You are invalidating the experiences of the majority by trying to use your own to write everybody off as bitter/petty. Since you said “slavery happened” and we should let it go and stop bringing it up, you realize that before your… Read more »

Persistence
Guest
Persistence

Well yes! Jc thanks a lot, really you are too kind! I appreciate it!! You made me open my eyes and I see that the struggle that black people have will NEVER end. Main stream society will never accept us. We are kept out because of how we look, act everything. So we tried to make a space so we can fit in, just a little space and all you could do, this lovely Thursday morning is get up and annoy an ENTIRE website. Really! Now we are struggling to keep the original intent bglh was started for. Black Girl… Read more »

Jonesable
Guest
Jonesable

I cannot believe JC wrote this trash?

Jonesable
Guest
Jonesable

Just stick to science JC.
After reading your article ‚I think you should stay far far away from social commentary.

juanicole617
Guest
juanicole617

SJP Sara Jessica Parker, Saved by the Bell’s Elizabeth Berkley, Keri Russell, Nicole Kidman was curly at one time just to name a few celebs rocking curly hair and being praised for it. Sooo, when I was in elementary school …born in 81′… my classes were 90–95% white and the girls wanted curls. Does anyone out there remember the perms? Not what we called perms but perms for straight haired women desiring curls. The white girls in my class would get they’re hair chemically treated to BE CURLY! I can remember the smell of a fresh perm now. Different from… Read more »

Mary
Guest
Mary

Did Sarah(the white ‘natural’) big chop or transition? I am all for inclusion but not for this one. If you simplify this issue to just a hair issue, you are simplifying the problem of racism and degradation which black women have and still are facing. Accepting natural hair is rejecting a culture which preached that we are not beautiful and we should change to conform to their standard. Now we are at a cross road and rejecting that standard. But yet the ‘standard’ is claiming to have the same struggle. We can’t find enough representation in mainstream. Imagine then if… Read more »

juanicole617
Guest
juanicole617

I also wanted to say that the last article did say there is a place for multiethnic and multicultural sites that serve us all but we still need a place where we can uplift one another. It’s not literally about #teamnatural but about a movement from a group of women who has been globally affected by a certain beauty standard. It’s a movement that is needed because mothers on the continent of Africa did not know how to care for their child’s natural tresses and relaxed them at an early age. Black women globally did not know how to manage… Read more »

Kayla
Guest
Kayla

We don’t owe white women a damn thing. This article is filled with bullshit! Black people stop coming with your torches to defend white people. You look silly as hell because they have never and will never do the same for you. Worry about uplifting your people because we have plenty of issues of our own.

Candace
Guest
Candace

Seriously, because someone says “hey, other people have struggles” that means that you “owe” them something?

It’s not about “defending” white people, but about recognizing that it’s hypocritical to demand that people view you as an individual and respect your struggle while you refuse to give them the same respect.

It’s more than hypocritical, actually. It’s straight out ignorant.

Kayla
Guest
Kayla

I can tell you now that I don’t give two shits about Sarah’s struggle point blank period. The only reason white women want to be included in the natural hair movement is because they want everything to revolve around them? What about me? They can’t stand when they aren’t the center of attention. If you would open your eyes you would see that Sarah is doing this for shits and giggles. We let everyone into our culture and then guess what they start making profits off of it. I could go on and on. Wake up! seriously white women are… Read more »

Kayla
Guest
Kayla

We have texture discrimination in the natural hair community, but white women need to be included. They can watch from the side lines because they have more than enough outlets for them. Now you say we are doing the same to them, nope we aren’t they have enough outlets for their “struggles” they can go there. They shouldn’t be getting sympathy from any black person. I hope all of these ne blacks cape this hard for their own people.

Candace
Guest
Candace

I defend the right of the KKK to march down the street in my town because in America we have freedom of speech. When I tell the KKK that their speech is not protected because I don’t like it, I make it easier for people to take away my right to free speech because I don’t like it. When you come on here and spew hatred and insults about an entire group of people, you make it easier for them to justify doing the same to you. Again, there is a difference between recognizing that white women often feel that… Read more »

Finn
Guest
Finn

So you’re implying that: 1.) spewing displeasure about somebody invading an exclusive space and patronizing us (she said herself she was just looking to start controversy (screenshots can be provided) is “hatred”. 2.)The “hatred” of number one is the same thing (as you said yourself) as the hatred of the KKK, a hate group with a history of murdering and torturing Black people? Now, Free Speech is your God given right as an American. What you (and a lot of people, for some odd reason) forget that Free Speech allows you to say whatever you want without fear of imprisonment,mental,… Read more »

Kayla
Guest
Kayla

I forgot to add that black people give their entitled asses respect on the daily and demean their own people to do so. Black people are not oppressing sarah’s ass. She can have a damn sit and so can the new blacks. #nokumbayashit!!!!!!!!

Jazine
Guest
Jazine

It is truly a new day. I’m so happy to see black women, particularly African-American black women, put down some boundaries from outsiders appropriating our spaces. Enough is enough! This preoccupation of being seen as “fair” and not “jealous” hasn’t gotten black women very far historically. That’s why I wasn’t surprised by the white woman who was featured in CN being “shocked” and “hurt” by the backlash. I’m not surprised by the black women caping to her defense to show they are not “angry” or “jealous”. They are the “fair” and “reasonable” type of black women. People are so use… Read more »

#Adoseofreality
Guest
#Adoseofreality

“Now, substitute the word black with white in that first sentence and read it again, seriously do it now! Do you realise that we are discussing apartheid? If you believe that the principles of apartheid were racist, then when black people do it, it is also racist.” I respectfully disagree 1000%. The fact that you’re even comparing the principles and basis of the arpatheid to the those of the NEED for exclusivity in the natural hair movement is extremely misguided at best. Frankly, it’s down-right patronizing, disgusting, and insulting. Note that I emphasized the word “NEED” above. Whites during the… Read more »

Anon87
Guest
Anon87

What is some of this nonsense I’m reading from our fellow black Europeans, painting some rosey picture of life for naturals in Europe lol. You do know that USA and Europe are two sides of the SAME coin? USA is just a little bit more “honest” with their racism. Check both USA’s & Europe’s foreign policies; STILL murdering and exploiting non-whites back home in Africa AND the carribean. Hell, just look at your damn TV, read a newspaper/magazine. They ain’t concerned about you or your hair! No one has ever made derogatory comments about my hair or skin tone (I… Read more »

April-joy
Guest
April-joy

I live in NYC. I come to sites like this to recover from the contempt the subtle racism, and the rejection I receive each day. All education is not education so please…take not 1 but 4 seats. Sociology teaches us to recognize how ideas, and ways of thinking become institutions. It also seeks to change how we think about issues…don’t be fooled, just because I have changed my way of thinking does not mean others have changed their thoughts about me…so it remains that I need support from those who understand my pain! So I beg you, stop the madness… Read more »

Prettydarkskinnedgirl
Guest
Prettydarkskinnedgirl

We can feel your pain because we know your pain…

Ldy
Guest
Ldy

Hi ladies, @JC: Normally I like your articles and blog, because it’s based on science, but this one.…WTH were you thinking comparing this to apartheid? You forget a very important aspect, and that is that the natural hair movement / team natural was born out off necessity! Curly Nikki had responded (to the article on Ebony): http://www.curlynikki.com/2014/07/curlynikki-responds-to-ebonycom.html She says she can understand both sides, but I don’t believe her. Sadly, most responses on her reaction are not crtically and only screaming ‘hallelujah, amen and YES:( I can understand that everyone is not on the same page, but it irritates me… Read more »

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

I know why all the comments are so positive on CurlyNikki, she is deleting negative comments and blocking the commenters. Less than 45 minutes after I wrote the following post, I was deleted and blocked: CurlyNikki was very helpful to me early in my transition to natural hair, but I don’t think you should give yourself so much credit for making natural hair popular. Its popularity stems from the many women who struggle each day in their various spheres, refusing to conform to a Euro-centric standard of beauty and choosing to share their experiences in this and other forums. Let’s… Read more »

Cheryl
Guest
Cheryl

Curly Nikki sold out a long time ago. She is probably the laziest blogger in the natural hair world, constantly featuring guest bloggers and content that has little to do with natural hair. She has yet to use videos for hair tutorials and spends most of her time getting “turned up” abroad. Honestly, I don’t see how her professor husband has a job since he is constantly traveling with her and getting drunk himself, SMH! And yes, she will delete posts that challenge her and her “beehive” will go after anyone who disagrees. I’m glad she is getting controversy now…maybe… Read more »

Prettydarkskinnedgirl
Guest
Prettydarkskinnedgirl

CurlyNikki (the site) is owned, and to my understanding, operated, by a white run corporation called Textured Media & no longer by Nikki herself because she sold it. I think she’s still just “the face” of the site but doesn’t actually run it. That goes a long way toward explaining the disconnect between her viewpoints & what’s actually happening on the site.

http://thyblackman.com/2014/07/03/natural-haircare-blog-curlynikki-white-women-and-the-need-for-all-black-spaces/

Twinkle
Guest
Twinkle

I had no idea she did that..I knew something was up.I use to like her site a lot..not anymore though..it’s quite boring now

juicifruit89
Guest
juicifruit89

Yes she deleted and blocked me as well for criticizing their decision. Since she sold the site to white women, I’m pretty sure it’s not her moderating anymore smh. Glad to have BGLH.

Michelle
Guest
Michelle

The responses on Nikki’s site are in agreement with her stance because, over time, she deletes the ones that are not.

Carleee
Guest
Carleee

JC, please stick to what you know–material science, not sociology nor trichology.

Lei
Guest
Lei

I’ll start off by saying that I do believe that there is a need for exclusivity. I believe that a safe place where black women can discuss their experience is incredibly important and under serviced. Using Apartheid as an example is, in my opinion, incredibly damaging. Every group in existence has a place of exclusivity, whether it be hobbies or culture. Where I think the article has a point is that all places should allow for a level of learning. The attitude of various people towards natural black hair cannot change without education. The majority of hate-based responses comes from… Read more »

Cheryl
Guest
Cheryl

I agree wholeheartedly, and quite frankly, I resent the comparison and the tendency for whites to use terms they created to disfranchise black people against black people! Apartheid?? please have a few seats?! What do they think the natural hair movement is? Reverse discrimination?! This is not some white girl getting turned away from law school because an African-American was admitted supposedly due to “Affirmative Action”! It amazes me that some whites think they can encroach upon any cultural creation of Black people.…I’m disgusted…

Carleee
Guest
Carleee

After reading through all of the comments on this issue, I have to say that BlackGirlLongHair has some of the most educated black women on the internet as its audience. That is all.

naps#1
Guest
naps#1

u read all of the comments, WOW I had to stop and eat supper and take a mental break…

Tisha
Guest
Tisha

Seriously!!! Why do we Even have to tell Non Black women this is NOT for you. I am Offended there Even asking. Talk about entitlement. It’s not… really?? Let’s use a example 1. The Support Group for Leg Amputee’s will start with opening the floor to new members who would like to introduce themselves. Yes you with 2 uhmm legs?? “Hi I’m Mira & I broke my leg in 3 places 1 year ago & recovery has b-” Uhmm I’m sorry mira, but I think your in the wrong group. This is for people that have lost 1 or both… Read more »

Apartheid
Guest
Apartheid

I’m from the country that ‘blessed’ mankind with the term and institution of apartheid. I’m currently attending a university that is a bastion of apartheid-dom. We have statues and residence halls commemorating the architects of apartheid. Please mind your words and don’t be so gilb about things you know NOTHING about. Otherwise, keep your factual hair articles coming. That, you are convincing in.

ohsnap
Guest

All this. For one white girl. Where are all of your tiny violins to accompany all this drama?

TWAtl
Guest
TWAtl

Ridiculous over the top comments. I can understand that a white woman’s curly haired struggle is nothing like and is not comparable to the crap we have to deal with by having afro hair, I get it. However if one article by or picture of a white woman or one article defending her inclusion fills you with so much rage, what you want is not a “safe space”, its a place to fertilise and nurse your bitterness until it consumes you. Since when does one article by a white woman turn a black natural website into a mainstream site????

pbotts
Guest
pbotts

Indeed…These reactions speaks of much deeper rooted problem.

Temple
Guest
Temple

Yea, something like, idk, eurocentric beauty standards and systemic/institutionalized racism. Those deep rooted problems. Lolss

Cheryl
Guest
Cheryl

Personally people with your reaction are beyond naive!!! If you think that this “one white girl” is the only white person with this attitude, then I have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell you for 15 cents! Wasn’t it a white male Alan Bakke who didn’t get into to the University of California medical school that ignited the movement to destroy affirmative action? (he was successful by the way!) And what about Jennifer Gratz, a white female from Michigan who eliminated affirmative action from admissions policies at the University of Michigan, and now diversity on this campus has declined significantly… Read more »

cacey
Guest
cacey

have you been reading the comments really? because what i took away is that this incident is indicative of a common trend where white people are concerned. that is why the “rage”, as you put it. these are not isolated incidents. if it’s not one thing it is indeed another, where black spaces are undervalued and disrespected. THAT is the point.

Pseudonym
Guest
Pseudonym

Maaaaaan, this whole “2000s Natural Hair Movement” is so divisive and time consuming be it the issue being discussed, texture discrimination, Natural nazis, product junkies, etc., I kinda just want everyone to go back to perms so they can all shut up.

ebony
Guest
ebony

Kinda like what white people say. Gang violence, unmarried black mothers, OH MY! I kinda wish we could go back to the slave old days so these black educated buffoons can just shut up.

Bean
Guest
Bean

Lol!

#Adoseofreality
Guest
#Adoseofreality

And I kinda just want you to go back to where you came from and have a toilet seat. #GetGone and #BeSeated.

Hannah
Guest
Hannah

Natural Nazi’s” Are you fricken kidding me right now?

Anne
Guest
Anne

It is funny how white women don’t whine when they are the only ones being represented when it comes to beauty. When white women start saying that all women should be represented in the media and not just them and non white women whose appearance are closer to white then they can join our movement. Until then they should take their white tears back to white and black men because I am not falling for it.

Twinkle
Guest
Twinkle

Good point! They damn sure don’t care!

BeautyIAM
Guest
BeautyIAM

“Now, substitute the word black with white in that first sentence and read it again, seriously do it now! Do you realise that we are discussing apartheid? If you believe that the principles of apartheid were racist, then when black people do it, it is also racist.” Oh…my…goodness…Did JC really just compare this to apartheid???? With all due respect JC, But hell no. This is not the same. No, no, and no. There is a lot of context that you missed in this article. So I really cannot take this seriously. But I will always appreciate you bringing the science… Read more »

ISTHIS2014?
Guest
ISTHIS2014?

I have seen the controversy stirred up. All I am saying is we have fought to be desegregated and here were are trying to segregate ourselves yet again, but this time with our hair, and not only that, we are acting with as much hatred as there was in past. All this makes me feel am in a middle of a racist meteor storm with people that still have cooped up anger only now to explode because of one white woman’s opinion of her self acceptance. There is power in numbers…be the change you want to be!!! Talk is cheap… Read more »

Jessi
Guest
Jessi

I totally agree. People are being consumed by their bitterness. If any race wants to claim they are natural around me go ahead. Natural to me is a state of mind. It’s about self acceptance. So anyone who is down with self acceptance is welcome in my book. First it was if you colored your hair you couldn’t claim being “natural”, then it was if you used any type of chemicals on your hair you couldn’t claim “natural”. Then that was changed to if you used any texture altering chemicals you weren’t “natural”. Then it was if you wore weave… Read more »

AnaDion
Guest
AnaDion

+1 What makes this whole scenario so frustrating for me is that a lot of the naturals who are against the exclusivity of the community are reacting with so much rage and disrespect toward those that do not share their opinions. You cannot say that you believe in an open door policy without being told to check your history books and recognize your culture’s never-ending repression at the hands of white people. I know my history and I witness and feel the struggle of my people everyday- but that struggle has never been mine IN REGARDS TO MY HAIR. My… Read more »

Finn
Guest
Finn

The point is that just because you have not experienced the struggles yourself, you do not invalidate other people. If enough people are talking about experiencing the same thing, there are studies and articles proving these experiences, and you are truly understanding of your fellow neighbor, you let them rock. No one believes that you should self-segreagate, which seems to be the concern of a lot of people on here. “spewing more hate” is a false equivalency. Comparing the struggle for one race’s exceedingly obvious struggle to accept their features that are considered ugly by societies all over the world… Read more »

Finn
Guest
Finn

In case you guys didn’t get the visual:
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/tumblr_mp6tvvLRbX1rn2ucwo1_500.jpg[/img]

AnaDion
Guest
AnaDion

I’m assuming that since your comment was directly beneath my own that it was directed at mine- if not please ignore. I do not argue that there is a need within the Black community for self-promotion and the strengthening of our own people. Or that the Black Americans have experienced so many setbacks within our history that it is a cultural necessity to to work harder to ensure the elevation of the Black community- which is why programs like Affirmative Actions are not reverse racism (which is an argument which I have heard too often from too many people). What… Read more »

Stop that
Guest
Stop that

We have fought to be desegregated yes, you are right. But, we are still being discriminated against on literally all fronts. We’ve let white people integrate into our cultural and daily lives. And what have we gotten in return? An article from Variety saying Elvis created Rock and Roll, Stop and Frisk, and Iggy Azealea/Macklemore being crowned for their unique and amazing achievements in Hip-Hop. If society has not acknowledged us despite our efforts to be acknowledged, who is really the bigger issue here? These comments are all saying the same thing: We did not exclude Mainstream folks by choice.… Read more »

flouncingtart
Guest
flouncingtart

Did you just say that black people self-segregate? As opposed to black people are ignored in mainstream media and culture and therefore have to create spaces for themselves to exist?

Do you even know what segregation is or was? Do you even realise that black people are still segregated based on socio-economic status? Read a history book and stop embarrassing your ancestors with this trash.

Ms LiLi
Guest
Ms LiLi

So glad people did not just sit back and allow this nonsense to be spoon feed to us like fowl medicine that had to be endured. The whole reason for the natural movement is due to the black woman’s own exclusion in white society when it comes to our hair. So just because it is successful and demanding attention we have to include people who poses the standard of beauty we wish to break free from. Their experience is not ours! Never will be. Stop the nonsense.

Prettydarkskinnedgirl
Guest
Prettydarkskinnedgirl

This is a PERFECT example of when the comments are better than the actual article!

ebonyNOTivory
Guest
ebonyNOTivory

right, love it

Erika
Guest
Erika

I’m not sure apartheid means what you think it means…

Finn
Guest
Finn

So, I have like actual legitimate questions that have not been answered in either article (this article is doo-doo by the way): Okay, so there’s a lot of talk about Black women being racist for not including women of non-black/African descent, right? So, how do we get like the big media places like Cosmo and Vogue and like movies and stuff to include us? How do we get casting directors flat out tell black actors/models/etc not to show up? How do we get Mainstream Hollywood to accept “Black Hollywood” and let them be in films? How do we stop Mainstream… Read more »

La Toya
Guest
La Toya

See I knew something like this was going to happen sooner or later. yall have to understand the government and other higher ups won’t allow us (black women) to stand alone in our journey bc its power in it. like this website and urban bush babes and others. They are watching yall to see how much power you are generating. this is a real serious movement among us blacks and they are going to shut it down like they always have done. lol yall REALLY need to look at the history of movements in america starting in the very early… Read more »

cacey
Guest
cacey

even when blacks would attempt to create micro economies for themselves to distance themselves from white economies, so they could be come sufficient of themselves and sustain their own communities, whites have a HISTORY of sabotaging on purpose black people’s collective efforts to build their communities. they want us in position of the subjugated and powerless. because if we got to a place where we could compete on level playing field they’d be doomed. their last claim to fame is twofold: their “positive” (read: dominant) image via the media, which is why they work so hard to exclude all people… Read more »

Jade
Guest
Jade

white people don’t care about representation until their not included. black spaces are important, white women can join this movement as soon as there are as many cases of white people being denied jobs, discriminated against, and policies being made against them because of their hair.

sasha
Guest
sasha

If a discussion and exploration among black women that has largely been internet based has resulted non-black women being invited to the table (notice I did not mention invited to the audience) than we can stop the discussion / exploration because we have accomplished our goal. This is assuming that having non-vlack women at the table was the objective. Why have a website like bglh or cn? I believe that this is a timely discussion because there areanu different discussions and perspectives regarding the natural hair among “black women.”. Black american women have a historical context that differs from ”… Read more »

Chandra
Guest
Chandra

Funny thing is I don’t have to comment at all on this post. JC has been checked left, right, center, diagon..you get it.
Also I teared up with pride reading some of these comments, honestly, that so many educated and eloquent Black women here spoke up for all of us.
We don’t need to apologize for any space of support that we create for ourselves. Rock on ladies, the next generation of beautiful Black women I think will be okay.

La Bandita
Guest
La Bandita

Im from the Caribbean and so proud of American Black ladies.

Enlightenment
Guest
Enlightenment

First of all, lets discuss marginalism. Do you think White people in Africa cry over their lack of representation in the media or marketing? I don’t think so. Truth of the matter is, Black people are a minority in a majority White dominated country, don’t expect White people to create something and then include us, as some form of favour. That is symptomatic of an inherent inferiority complex. Second of all, White people also used the notion of exclusivity to propagate segregation, effects of which are still being felt generations after. It’s one thing to say we want a place… Read more »

I agree wholeheartedly.
Guest
I agree wholeheartedly.

I remember when Obama became President back in 2008, most Black people celebrated like they were becoming president, they thought now that we have a Black president all our troubles and problem would suddenly cease to exist but when reality finally set in and they came to the realisation that actually Obama wasn’t going give any preferential treatment to Black people, people started saying Obama isn’t our president. LOL. I saw a publication on the internet that Black people have a higher unemployment under Obama than under Bush. It’s about time we stopped this naive charity seeking attitude. When you… Read more »

Dananana
Guest
Dananana

I’m sorry for this because I kinda see where you’re coming from a la President Obama, but you lost me with “charity-seeking attitude.” Let me serve up a slice of my reality to you: I graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Fisheries and Wildlife in 2013 (basically, an applied biology degree focusing on zoology and conservation ecology; lots of math, lots of chemistry, lots of research). Before I graduated, I applied to a prestigious graduate school (made it to interviews, didn’t get in) and every entry level job in my field that I set sights on. I was eventually hired… Read more »

Patricia Kayden
Guest
Patricia Kayden

Good luck to you. The economic environment is tough for many people — even those with degrees. I believe that “I Agree Wholeheartedly” was stating that it’s better to be educated than not when it comes to the job market, which seems to make sense.

lilly Moore
Guest
lilly Moore

President Obama is not the reason for high unemployment for African-Americans at this point in time nor at the time of his taking office. Also, you claim that African-Americans thought that their troubles would be over because he became president, maybe it is the circle of black folks you are most acquainted with. I don’t feel many African-Americans of a certain maturity ever took his becoming president to mean that all the social issues within our community at large would be communicated and addressed. When President Obama was first elected by popular vote, he was referred to as America’s first… Read more »

TIFFANY DAY
Guest
TIFFANY DAY

AND BLACKS CREATED BLACK WALLSTREET AND THE WHITE FOLKS BOMBED IT! SO DONT SIT THERE AND ACT LIKE BLACK PEOPLE HAVE NEVER CREATED ANYTHING. FLORIDA HAD ROSE WOOD TOO AND IM SURE THERE ARE COUNTLESS OTHERS TO BE MENTIONED AS WELL.

Jade
Guest
Jade

On the surface to anyone this would seem like an intellectual post but “the only way we as a people will move forward is to sop victimising ourselves.…how do we achieve this? education” Are you serious? Black people are victimising themselves? WE ARE THE VICTIMS. We have been the victims for hundreds of years, yeah its important to get an education but do you really think that’s going to stop oppression? Success doesn’t take your blackness away, Oprah is one of the most rich black women and she still faces blatant racism. A black young man in an ivy league… Read more »

I agree
Guest
I agree

I so sorry I meant to thumbs up your post but click thumbs down by accident. I totally agree with you. There was a poll recently that show that Black Women were the most educated by race and gender, but how much have that helped us. Like you said with still have to work twice as hard for less. Even if you work for yourself it the same thing because who is going to be your consumer. I have meet Black women who have great education and experience but still have to charge less for their services and do twice… Read more »

redpaperlantern
Guest
redpaperlantern

In the end, the blogger makes the final decision as to what they put on their blog, not the readers. In the end, it is up to me, the reader, to decide whether it is worth it to continue to visit a blog that pushes ideas that are not useful to me, justifies what is clearly **wrong**, or no longer serves me or caters to people like me, with nappy, **natural** hair, like mine. This piece by JC justifying/defending inclusivity, on the heels of the Ouidad Oilgate piece are a signal to me that direction that this blog is going… Read more »

Victoria Owl
Guest
Victoria Owl

One side wants inclusiveness, the other sides wants exclusiveness. I can see valid points for each argument and it took me some time to realize certain things after reading many comments and different perspectives. As I stated on other sites there are obviously much deeper rooted issues among the black community that only we as a people can fix. We cannot wait around for anyone other than our own to bring us ALL together in order to work this out. And we cannot allow differences in opinions and lack of full understanding on these issues to cause a division among… Read more »

Victoria Owl
Guest
Victoria Owl

I meant to say **Until such time, ALL are welcome to view our online communities in order to learn and be inspired because as Jc mentioned, we have to think about the children especially children with parents who are not black and completely clueless about our hair. We can still share our communities in that sense while still bing exclusive. A perfect example is this website and other websites a like. They are open to the public and all are welcome to view and learn but still specifically focuses on the needs of the black community and their hair care.… Read more »

lilly Moore
Guest
lilly Moore

No, we don’t have to think about them! If they have a black child in their home then they should have enough love and intelligence to seek out the information that they need for the child in their household. You need to keep in mind this so called natural movement is not just about finding yourself and wearing cute hairstyles, not relaxing/choosing to relax/perm,what new hairline to try, what hair show to attend or does Beyoncé comb Blu’s hair or not! Just Sayin! So much more relevance to the issue(s)! White folks ain’t tryin to spend their time lookin out… Read more »

Jill
Guest
Jill

I wish we could see that as black women, this natural hair movement has the ability to inspire ALL types of women all over the world,

I see nothing wrong with that.

ashley
Guest
ashley

There is nothing wring with us inspiring them. There is something wrong with them co-opting us.

La Bandita
Guest
La Bandita

Inspiration is good — not the issue.

Take over es bad.

Christina
Guest
Christina

I think being natural is for everyone! For me its a lifestyle of accepting yourself the way you have been created and avoiding things that harm you. This includes hair, as well as your general being. Thus, for me stopping to relax my hair has influenced other areas of my life and has lead to me working out regularly, doing yoga, avoiding toxic substances in hygiene articles (including monthly hygiene),as well as avoiding hormonal contrapeptives etc. I think way should be gone by everyone. And of white women feel inspired to accept and love themselves and to do whats good… Read more »

lilly Moore
Guest
lilly Moore

We are not one and if you believe that then you are quite naive. White women are not confronting the issues that affect African-American women. Being natural as so many call this movement is more than about what hairstyle should I wear outside today! The issue(s) surrounding people of color especially Black people throughout the world is more about them being being able to dictate their relevance upon this world and not being deemed to follow the path that others set for them!

coolerthanu
Guest
coolerthanu

Sigh…Ashamed that Black women can never have anything that is our own. In my opinion, the movement is just for black women with different types of Afro hair. Even black men are the enemy, because worse they have never accepted our hair, so this is not the black natural hair movement, it’s the black woman natural hair movement. All of you ask “Where were white women? blah, blah?” But where were black men? This is not coming from a feminist point of view, I just think that speaks volumes about black men who never supported us black women and our… Read more »

Emi
Guest
Emi

reading this made my eyes bleed. The ignorance is strong in this piece.

Amari
Guest
Amari

Yes, this piece is very ignorant. Actually, that’s why I love that we can live in a world where we can express our opinions because this piece clearly demonstrates the argument for exclusivity to heal. As an attorney, a Black woman educated in top private institutions around the world and I have traveled to almost half of the world, I have been among many different people where exclusivity is not even a world, it is a shared culture and experience; and, also I have been in mostly all white communities almost my whole life. So this article, when I read… Read more »

monaytt
Guest
monaytt

I just feel there is already a “fight” with promoting and supporting kinky/coily hair just within the black community. I mean we just had an article not too long ago saying type 4 naturals were getting less views/likes on Youtube and other social media than someone with type 3 hair. It’s great there are white women embracing their natural curly hair instead of turning to chemical treatments, but there is a fear if they join the natural movement type 3c‑4 hair might be pushed even more into the background. I might think a little differently if, just as someone commented,… Read more »

Truth
Guest
Truth

This kind of navel-grazing right here is why white people are always stealing your shit from you. They took your rock music. They took your hip-hop and your rap. They want bits and pieces of your culture, your history, your fashion, your language, your dances and you just hand it over to them with a smile because you think it’ll make them like you. Except it doesn’t. They just manipulate it, mangle it beyond recognition and sell it to their white friends and they can’t even give you the credit, let alone the profit. And then suddenly what started out… Read more »

Finn
Guest
Finn

They can never answer this. Lmao you will never get a response to age old question of “Well, we keep giving, so why aint we getting anything back???! :(“. They will read your comment ready to defend the poor excluded majority against the “elitist, mean, petty Black folks”.

Then they get to the “well, how do we handle this?” or the “what do you suggest about that?”, and they just move on to the next equally vague, useless NuNegro comment with praise and agreement.

Wash, rinse, repeat.

Jumoké
Guest

shit… I got kinda teary eyed just reading this! I commend you sister for your articulate words! You really hit the nail on the head!!

Temple
Guest
Temple

Beautiful response!

lonelycatlady
Guest
lonelycatlady

No they never learn, they will keep making the same mistakes and hurting themselves. Excellent post btw. Black women were never “ugly” and never will be, and that’s the problem. They want us to believe our hair is difficult, and that “white” is the default setting for humans. They did it with Native Americans with the skin color thing, the Native was red because they saw the white woman and blushed” did you know that? Either way, you know they believe they are the default setting for humans and that everyone else needs to “fix” themselves, in order to be… Read more »

t.c.
Guest
t.c.

You. Better. Preach. Broken down like a damn fraction. Yet not one of those sellouts will answer your questions. But the answer is, they are willing to hand over what black women have built because they love whiteness more. They think the natural hair movement is nothing unless we have white women in our community. They privilege whiteness and are flattered, like the simpletons they are, that white women want to be our “sisters”. It’s really quite pathetic.

Aliya
Guest
Aliya

@Truth: PREACH!!! I am afraid, though, that not enough of us are conscious and aware enough to hear and overstand what you are saying.

Finn
Guest
Finn

This is all very simple guys. If you believe we need to not be exclusive, you need to come with facts. Real data proving how exclusion from a pro-Black movement is the equivalent of slavery (or apartheid *side-eyes*. I need historically factual and contextually based evidence. Where’s the evidence of long term inclusion from other races of Black women? Where are the (CREDIBLE) sources proving that Reverse Racism is alive and well? Because it has been provided on one side, and the other side has been giving us “well I don’t experience that!” and “ugh you guys! Slavery has nothing… Read more »

Finn
Guest
Finn

Correction! *long term inclusion from non-Black women* 🙂

Adía
Guest
Adía

I don’t know why the writer thinks that excluding white women from the natural hair community includes excluding white mothers who are doing their black children’s hair. that’s not what the debate is about

HeavnsGirl
Guest
HeavnsGirl

@Adía
Yup. Straw-man argument. Ain’t nobody got time for that.

To the left…

Amari
Guest
Amari

I think because it is scary and stressful to think that you are left out of a part of your black children’s hair. Most fears come from our self-doubts, which emanate from our insecurities (generally speaking); so, the part about excluding white women with black children from the conversation is a concern that comes from her issues, not from all natural Black females issues with multiracial hair. My husband is White/Middle Eastern and it won’t surprise me if they’re hair is different than mine, well then she has his family and their community to draw upon. Period.

anecine
Guest
anecine

The picture for this article is the perfect symbol for everything it represents: three white women (or maybe two white woman and a hispanic woman, i cant really tell) and only one black woman, on a website called BLACKgirllonghair. Including white people (at least for now while the movement is going to strong) will only lead black women being pushed aside and forgetting what the movement was really about, which was loving our OWN hair..

Nope
Guest
Nope

Ontop of that I’m pretty sure the Black woman in that pic is wearing a weave. Its like, wtf were you thinking…

Nikkidee
Guest
Nikkidee

Amen to that.

Kinksnnaps
Guest
Kinksnnaps

This article is stupid.

Just let their cries fall on deaf ears. That’s what they’ve been doing to us for centuries.

Two wrongs don’t make a right but you have to draw the line somewhere.

kinksnnaps
Guest
kinksnnaps

Ugh, “Natural hair should be for everyone”. Please. Where is this sentiment with the beauty standards and the being treated an equal with natural hair in the workplace. Being treated as an equal and seeing my hair as beautiful as someone with straighter hair should be for everyone also. While I believe that anyone can be “natural” in the sense of accepting what you have. This whole notion that white women being included and black women being exclusive is a bit hypocrytical and SELFISH. Where were all these people when the movement just started? Now that it’s gained momentum and… Read more »

Claire
Guest
Claire

Wait, you’re arguing that since they weren’t here in the beginning they shouldn’t be here now? Please understand that the “natural movement” can only become more and more successful from people continuously joining. I admit that I was not apart of this movement years ago (mostly due to the fact that I had not even heard of it, just like a lot of other people). I am not here just to get a piece of the “pie” though. I am here to educate and embrace myself — which is honestly starting to become hard to do from reading such an… Read more »

kinksnnaps
Guest
kinksnnaps

.…Yes, that is exactly what I am saying. If you (meaning the white person) didn’t care to represent, speak up for, or care to join us in the beginning, then why join now?

Bloop Bloop and Kermit
Guest
Bloop Bloop and Kermit

The movement has always been about black people. Always. There’s a reason for that. If you choose to ignore the history and inportance of celevrating our culture, you are truly the root of the problem. Its not avout becoming successful, its about finding acceptance and love in ourselves. The movement’s goal has ALWAYS been about seeing and understanding that Black is beautiful, and that we need to see the veauty in ourselves as a commubity before we can do anything else. If white people really wanted to contribute, they would be working to spread true acceptance in their own community.… Read more »

Finn
Guest
Finn

Black spaces have always been “exclusive”, because MAINSTREAM WHITE SOCIETY chooses not to represent us. Instead of whining about us being immature and ignoring the history of the movement, why don’t you worry about how you can fix things like this — since that’s reason the movement has been gaining traction (AGAIN)?
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Screen_Shot_2014-07–08_at_2‑4.jpg[/img]
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Screen_Shot_2014-07–08_at_2‑3.jpg[/img]
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Screen_Shot_2014-07–08_at_2‑2.jpg[/img]
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Screen_Shot_2014-07–08_at_2‑5.jpg[/img]

Amari
Guest
Amari

That’s right! Preach.

Jade
Guest
Jade

PREACH! Im telling y’all, the only time white people care about representation is when they are not included. Let’s look at the literally countless shows with all white casts(which is no coincidence)I hear nothing. Then we get one channel BET and they’re crying racism. I feel sad for anyone that thinks this issue doesn’t go any deeper than hair.

Hannah
Guest
Hannah

I find it kind of funny JC that you even used this picture to prove your point but actually it does quite the opposite. Look at all these type 3 curl gurls, there’s no type 4 chicks, no dreadlocks bahah just the “Good Hair” type 3 curls that everbody is so obsessed with. IF you look closely you will see that the WHITE PALE GIRL is front and centre whilst the extremely light skinned black girl is pushed to the edges. That is what will happen when you let white people whine and cry their way into our spaces. They… Read more »

Black Girl With Long Hair
Guest

Hannah, Thanks for your comment! However, I actually found the picture to run with this piece. JC just wrote the article. I was looking for a photo of a multicultural group of curlies and it was really hard to find. I spotted this one and used it. It’s from a CURLS ad. You can see it in the slideshow at the top of their site: http://www.curls.biz/

Gigi Poki
Guest
Gigi Poki

You see??! This is the shit I HATE! The mob mentality! I’m looking through the comments and I see that the people who agree with the article are voted down and people who disagree with it are voted up. Downvote all you want, I REALLY dgaf, but this needs to be said. EXCLUSIVITY BREEDS EXCLUSIVITY. We’re never going to remove these dumbass racial divides when people keep retaliating in puerile ways. I pray that ONE DAY — it won’t be in my lifetime nor will it be in my children’s lifetimes but ONE DAY we’ll be able to talk to… Read more »

Bloop Bloop and Kermit
Guest
Bloop Bloop and Kermit

.…So what are you’re thoughts on getting Mainstream media/society to include and stop being racist towards us, since that’s why these movements were even created? I feel like you’re focusing on us when there’s literally a bigger issue than us having a historically Pro-Black movement.

Just curious.

Gigi Poki
Guest
Gigi Poki

I JUST said exclusivity breeds exclusivity. Stir that into your question and you’ll have your answer.

It’s not one-sided. It’s not one side that’s going to change things.

Finn
Guest
Finn

We are the most likely to integrate out of any other race. We integrated Rock music; now seeing a Black person in rock is almost impossible. We integrated Hip-Hop and R&B; white artists then left that genre to create their own — Pop. Black Hair care is almost a trillion dollar market, but there are almost no Black business owners, and “ethnic hair care” remains a small segment in the Hair care grocery store. We move into white neighborhoods, white people leave in droves. We try to move into white neighborhoods, and they redline us. I’m legitimately curious how you… Read more »

Finn
Guest
Finn

Also, this “it’s not one-sided” argument is a logical fallacy. That is literally illogical.

That’s like saying a kid attacking a stranger is the exact same thing as the stranger defending themselves from an attacker. This mean that, since they are exactly the same both parties are equally responsible and the same punishment should be handed out.

Or saying that pedophiles having a preference for children is the exact same thing as the preference heterosexual people have for the opposite sex, or homesexuals who prefer the same sex therefore pedophilic relations are just as acceptable as relations between two consenting adult.

Finn
Guest
Finn

This is also illogical because you’re implying that a minority representing and celebrating themselves (a direct consequence of Racism) is the ROOT of racism/systematic oppression, and is thus why it is perpetually a problem.

It implies the problem will always be found in the consequences of an occurrence. Like victim-blaming in cases of abuse and sexual assault, it shifts attention away from the perpetrator to find “legitimate” reasons why the victim was targeted. There is no excuse for a behavior that seeks to DOMINATE/HUMILIATE/DEGRADE a person (or racial group).

Dananana
Guest
Dananana

That’s what you got out of this? That we (Black people) are the ones “making a big deal” out of skin color? Did you actually read all of the history and experiences in the upvoted comments? Or did you just come in here with your holier than thou ‘I’m above race’ attitude planning to ram more bs down our throats? I know that the epithelial layer that contains melanocytes is a fraction of an inch thick. I’m sure that the White dermatologist who told me that “Black women just have spottier skin” and basically refused to help me find a… Read more »

Gigi Poki
Guest
Gigi Poki

I am a first generation 100% African immigrant. I moved to America with my family when I was 3 years old. But thanks for your completely off-base assumptions.

And no, I’m not blaming BLACK people. I’m blaming PEOPLE. ALL people of ALL races. They’re the worst. This isn’t one-sided.

Dananana
Guest
Dananana

Mhmm. So I was right–you are operating from a privileged perspective: African privilege. You’re trying to act like your experiences are more valid than mine, when they are nowhere close to the same, as White people (when they choose to differentiate Black origins) hold native Africans on pedestal above African Americans. You seem to be one of those Africans that looks down upon and distances their self from other people of color in the U.S. because you have fully absorbed White society’s messages about them. Girl bye.

Hannah
Guest
Hannah

You’re trying to belittle people sufferings by stating skin is 1/32 of an inch thick yeh blah blah we get that, so? That didn’t stop white people from making us slaves, that didn’t stop arpatheid, that didn’t stop thousands of young black guys being blamed for crimes they didn’t do, that hasn’t stopped black people being refused jobs they are more qualified in than their white counterparts. Sorry but you’re like 500yrs too late to be crying “JUST SKIN” (Even though it’s really melanin but whatevs) Also there is a reason those comments are thumbed down, it’s got nothing to… Read more »

Gigi Poki
Guest
Gigi Poki

Ok. So you’re going to live YOUR ENTIRE LIFE being mad at white people for something their ancestors did? That’s like my great grandchild paying for MY crimes. It’s unfair. I’m not belittling ANYONE’S suffering. I’m saying terrible, HORRIBLE things have happened… Such is life. But there comes a time when you have to start at least MAKING AN ATTEMPT to move on. I’m from Africa. Straight from the heart of Africa. Do you know what black people do to EACH OTHER over there? My family and I escaped 17 years ago so I wouldn’t be kidnapped and sold into… Read more »

Jade
Guest
Jade

lol girl you are SO ignorant. please take this opportunity to educate yourself. what do you mean spend our life being mad at white ancestors? If black people want to THEY MOST DEFINITELY HAVE A REASON TO. They don’t even need to be mad at white ppls ancestors, they can be upset with white people today. See that’s the problem with people, yall expect Jewish people to hate Hitler and Nazis, but black people can’t hate white people. http://ktbannon.tumblr.com/post/54131942725/and-you-know-what-the-problem-with-white-people And this exclusivity breeds exclusivity BS, HA, sounds just like hate breeds hate. Nah boo, nothing works like that. We been… Read more »

Amari
Guest
Amari

That is exactly what I was trying to say. Colorblind is not BS, its racist to deny it. There’s nothing wrong with noticing differences, its how we react to them that has and probably will always be a problem with other groups throughout human existence. However, what’s inspiring is if you yourself can be an example to others by your actions that you do to uplift and love yourself, that is the best example and guide for others, in my opinion. To say that I don’t recognize color, hair, shape, etc. is a lie because I have eyes and a… Read more »

Gigi Poki
Guest
Gigi Poki

It happened. It’s horrible and tragic and we need to keep teaching future generations the history of world, which includes slavery and the holocaust. I’m trying to make the point that the healing will NEVER begin if you keep blaming every new generation of white kids. If Germany is only known as “The Face of the Holocaust,” till the end of time, nothing will EVER get done. If we continue saying “The white man is the devil because they enslaved your ancestors,” nothing will EVER get done. Living in the past has never helped anyone. There’s no changing the past.… Read more »

Jade
Guest
Jade

Lol honey that’s only going to happen in a dream. I don’t understand why you’d want to erase people s cultural background anyway.to be colorblind is to be racist, and you seem to want marginilized people to just forgive and forget CENTURIES of oppression. LMAO back to reality we goooo

Gigi Poki
Guest
Gigi Poki

Please explain to me how choosing to be colorblind is racism.

Finn
Guest
Finn
Bloop Bloop and Kermit
Guest
Bloop Bloop and Kermit

I would think that choosing to ignore instances where a group of people are systrmatically targeted, terrorized, murdered, and preyed upon (in spite of mountains of proof that it exist, it happens, and it effects one group in particular) would make you racist. Or at least self-hating.

But it’s not like the colorblind argument hasn’t been proven to be detrimental, and in fact a more passive aggressive form of racism. I doubt you would acknowledge proof anyway.

Angelita
Guest
Angelita

I think you’re exaggerating what the original author said, there was no venom in the words and people have different stand points on this, and most people are okay with it. You wouldn’t or at least it wouldn’t make sense for you to go onto a site that was about taking care of white hair, there’s an exclusivity in the differences we share. The exclusivity is about the fact we are discussing things that are inherently only relevant for US. People of other races can view these articles and comment and I would hope we would all have the decency… Read more »

Gigi Poki
Guest
Gigi Poki

That’s because I cannot PERSONALLY identify with straight white hair, but if someone can identify with MY hair texture, who am I to deny them the opportunity of getting information? Who am I to say, “No. I’M natural, you’re not. You can’t sit with us.”

Exclusivity breeds exclusivity. Soon every race is going to want something for themselves. Racial divides will take even deeper roots and before you know it, we’re back to segregating the drinking fountains.

Jade
Guest
Jade

nobody cares if white people come on this site to get some tips. thats not what this argument is about. its about the overall natural hair movement, which they are not includes in.

Gigi Poki
Guest
Gigi Poki

Well excuse me, I didn’t know black women had a monopoly on the term “natural.”

Amari
Guest
Amari

Most fears, your fear of being left out and I assume you are dealing with bi-racial/multiracial issues somewhere, comes from self-doubt, which emanates from insecurity. However, by the act of ignoring our differences you have chosen to perpetuate a melting pot, rather than a tapestry of diversity. In a majority “white” (really Westernized) world, not just country as with the influence of globalization, this melting pot is slanted towards Western ideals, and in America, it would be more white than not. I can be different and have shared and different experiences which does not comment or “exclude” you; yet, insecurities… Read more »

Gigi Poki
Guest
Gigi Poki

Thank you, Dr. Freud, for your ASTUTE observation. I mean, you’re 100% wrong, but thanks for trying anyway. No. By teaching my children to ignore EXTERNAL differences, I’m teaching them not to judge a book by its cover; that there’s more to people than what’s on the outside. You don’t need to lose yourself to include others. I’m a first generation African immigrant. I am well aware of my background and my history and I know HOW it makes me different. I just choose not to use that difference as a tool to alienate others. I know a LOT of… Read more »

Amari
Guest
Amari

I may have gotten the issue wrong, but you have issues with being different and how people judge others for their differences. Who cares, even if they are the majority, about when people judge others unfairly? We choose to care and then judge, thereby perpetuating a cycle of self-doubt, low self-esteem and low confidence, that others have tried to instill in us. Why should I tell others what to do and how to do it unless I’m projecting my own issues of self-doubt onto them? That’s the bottom-line to me and yet your reply comment seemed to illustrate that point… Read more »

Gigi Poki
Guest
Gigi Poki

I’m really not sure how you got that I have issues with being different out of what I said.

I stand out. I love my differences. I just don’t use my differences as a tool to alienate others. I don’t know how else to word that.

anecine
Guest
anecine

the website is called BLACKgirllonghair. not every race long hair. If you want all races included then you’re on the wrong site. Try curlynikki or naturallycurly. But if you don’t realizes why exclusivity is a necessity in a world that excludes us from everything else you need help. Its not that people who disagree are ganged up on, many of us just want a space of out own. Until 6th grade i was the only black girl in my school and all i saw around were differences (even though some kids did have curly hair.) When every i look at… Read more »

ashley
Guest
ashley

Having no exclusive spaces for POC (while non-POC spaces continue to operate without inclusion) only leaves POC with no spaces and non-POC with every space. It does not encourage or foster inclusivity from non-POC spaces.
I remember a few years ago there were all these initiatives to get more models of color on the runways in Paris and Milan. The designers iced out black models for 2 seasons. The hold the lions share. If they start opening the door, then we can CONSIDER sharing space with them.
Your skin is 1/32th” thick, but it’s your largest organ, it’s fairly important…

Adeola @ TheManeCaptain
Guest

I am very disappointed with this article Jc. Considering the fact that this website is called Black Girl Long Hair and the fact that the natural hair movement is for women with Afro textured hair. I see no reason why white people should be included or excluded. same way the civil rights movement wasn’t for the white, i feel the natural hair movement is not for the white. They already have so many blogs to cater to their hair and I understand parents with Black children. Still, this article is probably my least favourite of your work Jc and I… Read more »

bsbfankaren
Guest
bsbfankaren

I make a point of never reading comments that start with “first of all.” Thanks for stating your point of view JC. I too believe that natural hair should be inclusive and not exclusive and make a point of NOT joining any natural hair communities that are exclusive. While our journey’s are not all exactly the same, there is a lot to be learned from each other as women. As much as I dislike that the feminist movement tends to be all about white women, I am not about to then turn around and say natural hair should simply be… Read more »

Finn
Guest
Finn

So you have an issue about feminism (which is inclusive in it’s nature, and was always historically advertised as inclusive) being strong-armed by white women, but not with white women for wanting to strong-arm their way into a movement that has always been exclusive under the guise of “exclusion is not fair”? You do realize the only reason Feminism was successful was because they were allowed to integrate into our larger movement for Civil Rights, right? Funny how things like that work out. “American women of wealth, education, virtue and refinement, if you do not wish the lower orders of… Read more »

Finn
Guest
Finn

(So you have an issue about feminism (which is inclusive in it’s nature, and was always historically advertised as inclusive)

On my phone. It should be (which is inclusive in it’s nature, BUT was not historically advertised as inclusive).

bsbfankaren
Guest
bsbfankaren

Nice try, but the Feminist Movement has always included male supporters and therefore has not been simply an exclusive movement. So how is a woman who is not black, joining a natural hair considered strong arming exactly? That’s an odd term for simply wanting to learn from people who are already knowledgeable or attempting to learn themselves. My issue with the feminist movement is not that they are strong arming me, but that they are ignoring me, much as you are attempting to do to white women. That’s why your case is ridiculous on it’s face. We’re all women. We… Read more »

bsbfankaren
Guest
bsbfankaren

They were not allowed to integrate into the Civil Rights movement, but there was a realization we could not reach our goals without a united effort that spanned racial identity. It is seriously troubling how you and other’s here have manged to mangle history!