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3 Haitian Traditional Secrets for Longer Hair

• Mar 14, 2014

Recently, there have been whispers amongst the blogosphere claiming that Haitian women may have a secret related to maintaining long natural hair. I even found one comment that said Haitian 4c hair may even be somehow different because it shrinks less and is not so dry. While some attribute longer hair or hair with more luster to the tropical climate or diet, I focused my investigation on whether there are any traditional methods and products common among Haitians that may have a scientific benefit.

1. Moelle de Boeuf (Bone Marrow)

bone marrow hair product
Yes, I will start off with one that on the surface appears quite odd. Moelle de boeuf is French for bone marrow. There are tales of grandmothers stirring up bone soup , cooling it down to allow the beef jelly to form and adding that to oil to create a hair and skin moisturizer. Commercially, there are hairdressing pomades available with the highlighted ingredient moelle de boeuf. So, what is this miracle ingredient? Well, beef jelly derived from bone marrow is essentially gelatin! Commercially, gelatin is produced from boiling bones much like the grandma story! Gelatin is hydrolyzed protein and therefore can both strengthen and moisturize hair.

2. L’huile mascreti (Haitian Castor Oil)

haitian castor oil
Apparently almost every Haitian will have seen or used L’huile mascreti which is Haitian castor oil. It can be cold pressed with a yellow color or indeed have ash added to make it Haitian black castor oil. Most reviews that I have seen do say that the genuine article is supposed to have a really strong smell (some say stink) and therefore recommend adding an essential oil. If you are a fan of castor oil then this may be a variation that you may choose to try. As is common with castor oil, there are many who say it can help hair regrow (no hard evidence) as well as serve as a thick sealing oil for longer lasting moisture (definitely likely).


3. Nighttime Routine

braids2
Moving away from products and going to methods there is a rather common night time tradition of braiding hair rather than sleeping with hair loose in Haitian culture. Some may choose to moisturize and use l’huile mascreti in the process, while others just detangle lightly and create 8–10 braids. It is common knowledge, especially if your hair is fine, kinky,long or dense that compacting it in a braid or twist before sleeping will reduce tangling in the morning. You can also utilise the process to create a fresh braid or twist out. Scientifically, the less mechanical damage your hair experiences, the more likely it is to still be on your head for years to come.

Any Haitian ladies out there? What hair care secrets were you taught growing up? If you’re not Haitian, feel free to share your cultural background and what you were taught about maintaining natural hair!

About The Natural Haven

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momofIV
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momofIV

Another option for the collagen or gelatin is just to eat bone broth. It’s good for your hair, skin, teeth, bones, immune system…overall health. I would use organic grass fed beef or chicken bones.

LBell
Guest
LBell

Co‐signing on bone broth…it gives a nice healthy boost to almost any recipe that calls for regular meat‐based broth or stock. I highly recommend broth made from chicken feet (!)…there are several recipes online. To the topic: The last tip isn’t unique to Haitians. As a kid I remember watching period movies in which the (usually white) woman would take down her daytime updo and brush her (usually very long) hair before putting it into a single braid for bed. Bringing it to the present, I can think of several women (one of them, Fotki name Yassylane, has long been… Read more »

KP
Guest
KP

Castor oil seems to be the go‐to sealing product for many people. I think I should investigate!

Grey Poupon
Guest
Grey Poupon

Damn. The secret is out LOL!

Shannon
Guest
Shannon

^^^ hahaha I know right! Lol

Jo
Guest
Jo

Awesome! I’ll try all of these (except the marrow as it’s nonvegan). Does the ash make a difference in how the castor oil works?

Alexis Stevenson
Guest
Alexis Stevenson
Tyler
Guest

Interesting. I have lots of Haitian friends and I’ve never heard of these. Great tips!

Tyler
onelittleblackdress.com

Farah
Guest
Farah

I’m Haitian and I’m familiar with 2 and 3. I’ll ask my mom about #1. My family/mostly older folks used Castor oil a LOT! For everything. We also used avocado and eggs masks in conjunction with said oil on our hair when I was younger.

Danessa
Guest
Danessa

Yes Haitian castor oil is definitely big in the Haitian community and my personal favorite. And I LOVE the smell… Kind of nutty (if you live in a heavily haitian populated area find the ladies outside or little shops way better prices than health food stores.)

I never heard of the first one so I will ask around.

Vera
Guest
Vera

I’ve never heard of the bone marrow thing, but all else is FACT. Haitian castor oil is like the holy grail of oils in Haiti and works miracles. It’s similar to JBCO but thicker and smells stronger. As for the hair braiding, as a child my hair was always natural and never out. It was ALWAYS braided either every week or every other week. The only time it wasn’t braided was wash day. I have 3C/4A hair and now that I do what I want with it, it does not tangle. I literally detangle my whole head in 2 minutes… Read more »

Primmest Plum
Guest
Primmest Plum

Interesting stuff! The bone marrow bit took me by surprise. But I’m vegan, so I think I’ll give the Haitian Castor Oil a try. It can’t hurt.

Coco
Guest
Coco

I m from the Bahamas and Haitian castor oil is be the first thing to go in the beauty shops so says my mom. The next is be Jamaican castor oil love both of them !

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[…] except what I should be doing I ran into this article on Black Girl w/ Long Hair about some Haitian Traditional Hair secrets for longer hair. Just from the title alone I had to read further, and here’s what I […]

Mica
Guest
Mica

I say yes to all!! I was raised in moelle de boeuf. Unfornately, my grandma didn’t make it, mine was imported LOL but it does wonder for your hair! With the knowledge I’ve acquired in the last few years about hair, it makes sense why it works! Lwil maskreti (as written in Kreyol), which is our own very Castor Oil, is the ultimate remedy for EVERYTHING!!! You’re aching, rub it where it hurts; constipated, have a tbsp of it! I spilled some of mine once, I cried like a baby! I made sure none of it was lost! That thing… Read more »

Jc
Guest

Eep just coming to read the comments today, a belated thank you for the compliments 🙂

AJ
Guest
AJ

I am half hatian, a quarter Puerto Rican and who knows the last bit. But I wasn’t raised by the Haitian parent so this is news to me. I will say that my hair is stupidly thick and grows fast even though I have treated it so poorly. I attributed it to the Puerto Rican part but hey maybe there is something different about Haitian hair too!

carmen
Guest
carmen

No that’s wrong. Black castor oil is not made by adding ash to the oil. that’s actually disgusting. who would want to put ash in their hair. The opposite of cold press is hot pressed and that is how it turns out brown (not black) and if it’s done right it won’t smell bad.

tammy1969
Guest
tammy1969

Wow…this is so ironic,because this morning I was reading about health benefits of different broths and bone broth was one of them. I went to Whole Foods to purchase the grass fed beef bones and the veggies. II found this simple recipe beef bone broth recipe from a website called ramblings of a homemaker blogspot. I have everything needed in crock pot to make the bone broth and sat down to check my fb page and came across this post 20 minutes ago.

Rebecca
Guest
Rebecca

I am Haitian and familiar with all three! These are staple products in my household that are beneficial in mine and my 85 year old grandmothers hair in maintaining long natural hair. Especially the l’huite mascreti and the night time routine of braiding up our hair before bed.
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/image-20.jpg[/img]
This is a picture of my grandmother before bed.

Jc
Guest

Thanks for sharing Rebecca! There are not many fully grey naturals around and I love love her hair!

Lexi
Guest
Lexi

Elle me rappelle ma grand‐mère! Elle avait des cheveux exactement comme ça!

Rhéa
Guest
Rhéa

I am Haïtian born and raised, the author mentioned many of the secret above. The reason why Haïtian are known to have such “long hair” is the temperature, it’s extremely warm, which allows for the hair to be extremely moist.

Lau Afronoya
Guest

My parents are Haitians. I was born and raised in France, so yes i am definitly familiar with all three… But l’huile mascreti is a must have in the community. I think you’ll find at least a bottle of it in every Haitian’s house lol.
Thank you BGLH for sharing those tips.

Fabiola
Guest
Fabiola

Haitian born and raised here! How I wish I could go back to my younger days…hair wise! The secret may also have to do with less manipulation. Growing up, I remember getting my hair washed, combed and all greased with Dax (the green one); hair was put up in plaits until I was 14–15. Even when I got a perm at 15, hair was still put up in plaits. Roller setting is very important in Haiti for the relaxed ladies. Even when I came here and was relaxed, my mom roller set my hair every Sunday. My hair was at… Read more »

Rebecca
Guest
Rebecca

Haitian born and raised and l’huile maskreti is to diiiiiieeeee for

tamara fouche
Guest
tamara fouche

i love that haitians are being highlighted! so cool!! I would definitely saying nightly braiding and l’huile maskreti have helped my hair and my mothers hair stay long and healthy.

i also think a healthy diet helps. rice, beans, fresh chicken and fish, and lots of veggies help for sure!

belle
Guest
belle

Sakapfet! Definitely L’huile maskreti. Also, my fam love a good oil treatment covered with a plastic cap for a few hours. And an adopted staple is aphogee, phytospecific, and minoval.

Nancy
Guest
Nancy

Haitiennes kampe!!! The l’huile maskreti is the truth! Used for everything! My mom used to do lots of hot oil treatments & would also put egg or avocado In my hair before washing it as I got older. When I was a kid, it was very low manipulation, but there was hair grease involved! I also had the beer treatment before it was a normal thing. I’ve never used the bone marrow though.

Belinda
Guest
Belinda

I am Haitian !! 2 years and a half natural, yeeyyy !
I will not say l’huile maskreti because I hate the smell, i prefer coconut oil ! But pomade, especially with moelle de boeuf in it, is a must have. After I wash my hair, i do a oil rinse with coconut oil and vitamin E, let it dry in twists, then moisture my hair and scalp with some pomage and retwist
It helps to stretch my hair when i wear it out

Vanessa
Guest
Vanessa

Both my parents are Haitian and I have been natural all my life! I rock a curly fro now (wash and go) but my mom greased my scalped and I always did hot oil treatments! All my family has thick healthy hair. Our diet is pretty rich as well!

Gerardine
Guest
Gerardine

Both my parents are Haitian and I remember my mom giving me hot oil treatment, greasing my scalp and braiding it every Sunday night. I also had box braids quite a bit. I then got a perm during preteen years and my hair wasn’t as healthy. But I did the BC about 2 years ago and it’s healthier now!

savii
Guest
savii

I was born in the US but my mom and her family are from Haiti so too me l’huile mascreti is everything!!!!!! I’ve been natural all my life and that’s always been a staple. Braiding my hair wasn’t a nighttime routine but an everyday thing for me. Twice a week my mom would braid or plait my hair and put l’huile mascreti in it. She also washed it only when it needed to be which was every 2 or 3 weeks. I’ve heard of bone marrow being used but my mom never tried it on me.

Emy
Guest
Emy

Hey there! Thank you for this article on haitian tips, it’s super appreciated! So I live in Canada but my family is from Haiti, guys I have to say the moelle de boeuf sounds weird but it’s outstanding, my mom have used it in my hair since I was little and it really really helps with maintaining healthy shiny hair! I recommend it!

Also the avocado, mayo, eggs hair mask is the truth.

God bless!

Dine Stephen-Brandon
Guest
Dine Stephen-Brandon

I was born in the U.S. but both of my parents are from Haiti. As a child, my hair was its longest when my Aunt would do a hot oil treatment with Olive Oil. L’huile Maskreti would be given to us once a month to clean us out. We dreaded it! LOL. But it is awesome for hair also. The Moelle de Boeuf I learned of as a grownup but it did work wonders. My hair was in large plaits as a child with bobos and ribbons but it was long. The longest my hair as a grownup has been… Read more »

Ericka
Guest
Ericka

This is a really interesting article. I’m Haitian American and I hear this all the time. My friends alwaya say my hair is different. They’ll say I have “that Haitian hair”, “y’all hair is different/better”. Even when my hair was relaxed I heard this. Now that my hair is natural I hear it even more. My mother never used any of that stuff listed in my hair. She did however use pomade in my hair and do my hair in pigtails until I started high school. She never used anything special in my hair. But this is a great article.

Soleil
Guest

I am a second generation Haitian and I can definitely attest to L’huile mascreti! In fact, I was just talking to my mom about how Jamaican black castor oil reminded me of l’huile masceti. Growing up in a Haitian home and seeing the older women who held on to their natural hair despite the relaxer wave, I always noticed that their hair was so long and healthy. They would often keep their hair pinned up in an elegant bun (chignon) or plaited in braids. Fast forward a few years and I’m back at square one growing out the hair that… Read more »

Tina P
Guest
Tina P

I was born in the US. My Father is from Haiti and my mother is from Martinique. I recall my hair as a child being a little below mid‐back. Due to a product being advertised in the 90’s for black people ( I don’t know the name but my mom told me it was advertised by a celebrity from the Cosby show)my hair fell out at 12yrs old; I began a relaxer at 13, at 23 I big chopped, with a few minor set backs my hair has reached mid‐back length at 27(I think… length check in 2 weeks). As… Read more »

Sandrine
Guest
Sandrine

I am Jamaican and I realize that a lot of practices are common among Caribbean people. Even though we may have taken taken such practices for granted while we were younger. The bone marrow bit though is new to me and I am tempted to try it out.

Arrin
Guest
Arrin

Where can you find the bone marrow pomade? I have been using JBCO and will give its Caribbean sistren a try as well.

Sandra
Guest
Sandra

I am Haitian and I agree with the methods mentioned above. One thing to note is that any caster oil will work; so you don’t have to spend more money buying one that claims it is directly from Haiti. I have been natural for 2.5 yrs and I my hair is growing long and healthy with these techniques and others, such as greenhouse and etc. The main point for me is to want healthy hair more than a ‘good hairstyle’. I wear protective styles at least 2 to 3 weeks in a month and let my hair out 1 once… Read more »

Arrin
Guest
Arrin

Is it true you can get the bone marrow from the butchers at the grocers or should i look for it in powder form?

Sarafina
Guest
Sarafina

1st Generation Haitian American here! I’m VERY familiar with L’huile Maskreti, my mom and grandmother used it as a “cure‐all” for everything haha, Mom used to mix it with Vicks Vapo Rub to clear my sinuses when I was sick, as well as warm it up and put it in my hair for hot oil treatments. I must say, my hair was more moisturized than ever when my mom used that in my hair. I started relaxing my hair at 12 years old, and I went natural when I was 18. My hair was actually pretty healthy when relaxed, but… Read more »

natacha unelus
Guest
natacha unelus

Haitian american here‐ i have both Moelle de Boeuf and L’huile mascreti in the house right now. my mom used both in high school on me when my edges fell out with a relaxer. by the way L’huile mascreti us used in sooooo many home remedies, its unbelievable

Betty Eliacin
Guest
Betty Eliacin

Born and raised in Haiti. Lwil maskreti is true and it’s good for everything (cold, bone fractures, laxatives to name a few) moelle de boeuf is good too, braiding the hair is common practice

lockstress
Guest
lockstress

Oh yeah.…the moelle helped me out in the summer of 82! My hair had fallen out and my aunt used it all summer long and kept my hair braided and voila!

The castor oil was liquid gold in my house…lol!

I think as long as the hair is being braided and kept neatly wrapped…you can’t go wrong.

Kampe Haitienne! lol.

Faudia
Guest
Faudia

Alo alo medam. (Hello ladies). For sure im Haitian, born and raised, still living there tho. L’huile mascreti (in french “huile de palma christi) sure helps. U might also use the mooelle de boeuf from minoval, n others drops from minoval n minoxidil. Luil maskreti doesn’t stink as they said it… Well the good one doesn’t, it’s also use for massage. It’s a multi‐use product.

Nicole
Guest
Nicole

Since reading this article & doing my own extensive research I have just purchased me a bottle of Ketty hair moelle de boeuf & a bottle of minoval both from topskinclear.com… I’m relaxed & african american so I hope these work for my hair type as well!!!

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[…] previous articles, I discussed Haitian and African hair traditions and their possible benefits from a scientific stand point. Today, I […]

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[…] previous articles, I discussed Haitian and African hair traditions and their possible benefits from a scientific stand point. Today, I […]

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[…] previous articles, I discussed Haitian and African hair traditions and their possible benefits from a scientific stand point. Today, I […]

Natacha
Guest
Natacha

I remember as a little girl growing up in Haiti, my mom used to mix pomade and the Haitian castor oil (l’huile mascreti). My hair used to be thick as nd strong. That same oil is used to rub our chest when we have stuffy nose. We used to mix that oil with the bone marrow pomade.

Berlange
Guest

Haitian parents use Lhuile Mascriti for EVERYTHING! Oh Seigneur…

mmmdot
Guest
mmmdot

I know! I hated that!

Berlange
Guest

As a Haitian young lady, Lhuile Mascriti is a MUST. I’m not sure about the lenght process, but it does thickened the hair. Just like the article stated, braiding your hair at night works.
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/IMG_20131110_103123.jpg[/img]

Mani
Guest
Mani

My mom is Ghanaian, but i too remembered her and us using a mixture of bone marrow cream and castor oil. Good stuff!
I bought some gelatine leaves for now as in my neighborhood, it’s hard to find that cream.

P-LO
Guest

Haitian born and raised. I used and still use it. I don’t like the scent.
Thanks to my parents that goes to Haiti back and forth throughout the year I never run out.

We also use it for medicine (my Haitian people knows exactly what I’m talking about).
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/20140326_111930.jpg[/img]

marie
Guest
marie

i am a senegalese fulani and moelle de boeuf is also used in our culture along wih the famous shea butter.And in the particular fulani culture we use curd on our hair fat from pure cow milk

mmmdot
Guest
mmmdot

So cool!!!

marie sainville
Guest
marie sainville

hey im haitian born and raised in america i never that but my mom use when she was a child im 12 so hopefully i get to use moelle de boeuf haitian caster oil!!!

Rien Sand
Guest
Rien Sand

Also sleeping with tights = when I was little we have to put on our tights bonnet :p lmao I thinks it helps with length retention when I was little. Nowadays I use satin cap it’s better I think!

NaturallyMe
Guest
NaturallyMe

Sak Pase to all my Haitians!!!! Haitain‐born hear but raised in America. I remember when my mother would care for my hair and use the oil(which stunk) in my hair. My hair got braided twice a week beginning on a Sunday night. It was very ling and healthy, that was until I put that relaxer in my hair. Now about that bone marrow, don’t remember it being used. But I think I will start using it.

Valerie
Guest
Valerie

Hello! I was born in Haiti came to America at age 15. Haitian castor oil (l’huile mascriti) is AWESOME. Other then the scent, I think it’s the best oil EVER! I’m not talking about American castor oil, I’m talking about the Haitian kind. If you strongly dislike the smell, I suggest you to mix It with your favorite pomade. My mom used to mix it with pomade “Blue Magic”. My sisters and I had very healthy hair, until we came to America and mess it up with relaxer and heat. Another thing I believe Haitian 4C women use that keep… Read more »

Merlenne
Guest
Merlenne

Haitian born but raised in America. I have tried the l’uille mascriti and it does work for length and moisture. I have been natural for 12 years now and have mixed this oil with shea butter but now with MY DNA HAIR BUTTER and can testify you will be satisfied with the length and strength. Braiding your hair and leaving it alone at least 1–2 times a week really helps too!

Christie
Guest
Christie

I live in America to be exact also Ny where can I get some of the Castor oil I relax my hair and now it all fall out I don’t no what to do

Dani
Guest
Dani

I use for everything L’huile Mascriti It is a god sent

Lady
Guest
Lady

My hair is always in braids basically. Where can I find all these products?
I live in NYC

Drea
Guest
Drea

What part of NYC? You can find them in almost any black beauty supply store. I use to live in NYC and I would go to 125th and St. Nicolas‐ in Harlem and grab some from the Africans who sold out of their trunk. I would get: All natural Jojoba oil, Sage oil, Coconut oil, Shea butter (2 10 oz bottles) and castor oil for $30. You can not beat the street vendors’ prices. I still have my cousin send me hair products!

Dee
Guest
Dee

Looks like all we Haitians do the same thing, this article nailed it. Haitian castor oil is a go to product and we braid our hair at night. Never heard of the other stuff though lol.

Castor oil is my staple oil now. I add extra in my kimmytube leave in and it does wonders for moister. I sleep on satin silk pillows and keep my hair stretched with curlformers. My go to hairstyle is Bantu knot out.
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/image-5.jpg[/img]
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/image-6.jpg[/img]
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/image-7.jpg[/img]
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/image-8.jpg[/img]

Cesanet31
Guest
Cesanet31

As a Haitian I remember to hair washing every every 2 weeks with hot oil treatments and weekly braiding with some kind hair grease concoction that included l’huile mascreti, moelle de boeuf, Palmer’s Hair Success (which is the equivalent of Elasta QP Mango Butter) or somebody’s brand Hair Food). The tools were a wide tooth comb and paddle shaped large boar bristle brush straight from Haiti! My mom always braided my hair damp after air drying in large plats. No elastics, rubber bands or Bo-Bo’s. Your hair was braided tight in plats from root to end, every strand smooth and… Read more »

unaali
Guest
unaali

H20 remember the to drink half yourbody weight in ounces daily…plus a multi vitamin mineral with msm included…good luck

nikki
Guest
nikki

Why would hatain people even try to give an american person “our hair secrets” when MOST black people dont even ecept us…

Ila
Guest
Ila

Why make a comment like that? people from Brazil ‚Haiti,Jamaican,anywhere in Africa,Dark skinned people from India etc. Are black people just different culture,food, language but Europeans still see you all as BLACK people. No pun intended.

4c AmerRican
Guest
4c AmerRican

Stop acting like you dont know she meant Black American

KALIYAH
Guest
KALIYAH

THE SLAVE SHIPS WENT TO ALL OF THE ISLANDS IN THE 1400’S AND IN 1619 THE SLAVE SHIPS CAME TO AMERIKKA. WE ALL LEARNED THE SLAVE OWNER LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND THERE WHITE jesus WHICH IS A LIED, WE ARE HEBREW ISREALITES NOT AFRICAN.

Giovanna
Guest
Giovanna

I thought Haitian ppl ARE Black…I’m confused.

4c AmerRican
Guest
4c AmerRican

The only hair “secret” I see here is the contribution of tropical climate &“bone marrow” = Moisture Protein Balance. Girl Bye
Acting like people in the Islands dont like yall

mmmdot
Guest
mmmdot

Acting like people all over the WORLD don’t like y’all. Don’t blame US because everybody looks down on Black Americans.

4c AmerRican
Guest
4c AmerRican

Oh yeah and all the fish you eat in your culture which is a big contribution in omega and other nutients which is essential for hair and nail growth. Acting like y’all haven’t BEEN fleeing that island of yours. Don’t blame us or nobody wanting you in their country.

Natural Kinky Curly Marie
Guest
Natural Kinky Curly Marie

The blogger did absolutely NO RESEARCH none whatsoever. There is way more to the Haircare practices of the Haitian people than what this article mentions. I’ll come back and elaborate at another time; but most (in addition to practices of other cultures) are being implemented in the Haircare practices shared in the Online Haircare Community in recent years.

ApocalypticRain
Guest

I’m so done. I doubt they don’t except you but if there is cause for prejudice i can garentee it’s because the lot of this country is so far out of the wester social norms people dont even know what to do w/ yall.

Jeanny
Guest
Jeanny

I’m still bald and edgeless so what’s your point?

Rody
Guest
Rody

I am Haitian, when I was a kid my mom used to use castor oil in the hair but mostly on the scalp for better hydration. I had a head of hair before deciding to relax it. Leaving the hair alone was a good method my mom did as when you touch the hair too much, it dries up and fall.….good luck to you guys out there

Nana
Guest
Nana

I agree with Rody. Out of my 4 sisters, I have the longest hair cause I was tender headed and therefore my mom would only do my hair every Sunday as oppose to every day. Best advice is to leave your hair ALONE. Products are just added bonus, eat healthy and exercise. Your hair will produce it’s own oils!

Kandi Ladie
Guest
Kandi Ladie

I’m in the Midwest and a proud Black American with ties to Mississippi. I was raised by my Grandma and always had a decent length of hair. We used similar products based on the ingredients listed above and I wore plenty of Anna Mae/ Ceily braids growing. My friends were from all cultures including Hatian but never noticed any real difference in their hair lengths. I started doing my own hair at 10 including relaxing, curling and styling. Therefore, I paid attention to everyone’s hair. If you take care of your hair, it will grow regardless of what type of… Read more »

choco late
Guest
choco late

12

Taylor Culberson
Guest
Taylor Culberson

I am Haitian, Dominican, and “black” (african american) . Because the Africana was more dominant in me than the Hispanic my mother and grandmother gave me oil massages every night and I got the middle of my hair braided in loose cornrows and the perimeter of my head done in plaits every night. My mother put my hair in plaits and shells everyday for school. I also got my hair washed only on Wednesdays and Saturdays ( a regimen i still follow ) and my grandmother gave me a hot oil like treatment on Sundays. But because my mother’s mom… Read more »

choco late
Guest
choco late

1

choco late
Guest
choco late

My good friend, Haitians are black than a mother..and have the nappiest hair ever. Dominicans are black too but most tend to have less black in them, but they DO have african ancestry like all blacks…they just hate to admit it…african americans are no different.. they are black too, meaning they have africa ancestry. Actually, african american is an incorrect term. its stupid and should be done away with. they are simply american. race and ethnicity are two different things. being from haiti, dominican republic or united states means absolutely nothing but where you were born. There was no need… Read more »

Snapchat:bittersweet_wuv
Guest
Snapchat:bittersweet_wuv

I’m 11 years old and because of self esteem and bullying I begged my mom to perm my hair straight. Right now my hair feels like it’s getting longer and suddenly falling out. I’ve never heard of any ‘Haitian Hair Secrets’ since I’m Haitian. My hair is the same length as it was before and it’s confusing me because I expected it to be longer. Anyone have any tips?

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