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New Report Finds a 26% Decline in Relaxer Sales Since 2008

Avatar • Sep 9, 2013

relaxer

A new report by the research company Mintel finds that relaxers are declining in popularity as the natural hair industry grows;

…Natural may be the new normal in Black haircare, as relaxers account for just 21% of Black haircare sales and the sector has declined 26% since 2008 and 15% since 2011 when sales reached $179 million—the only category not to see growth.

Mintel’s research estimates the relaxer segment will reach $152 million this year, down from $206 million in 2008. Furthermore, in the past 12 months, nearly three-fourths (70%) of Black women say they currently wear or have worn their hair natural (no relaxer or perm), more than half (53%) have worn braids, and four out of 10 (41%) have worn locks.

The natural hair trend is driving an increase in sales of styling products such as styling moisturizers, setting lotions, curl creams, pomades, etc., but the increase has caused the relaxer segment to decline in sales,” says Tonya Roberts, multicultural analyst at Mintel. “A look at expenditures from 2008–2013 shows steady growth in the Black haircare category for all categories except relaxers/perms.”

The report doesn’t touch on whether the increasing popularity of weaves has to do with relaxers’ decline. Still, it highlights an encouraging trend towards acceptance of textured hair.

Click here to read the full summary of the report.

Ladies, what are your thoughts?

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juanicole617
juanicole617
7 years ago

Those low prices are unbelievable! But I am no longer looking to purchase a relaxer.

101Corkscrews
101Corkscrews
7 years ago

They’re still racking in millions upon millions.….

myblackfriendsays
7 years ago

Where’s the “like” button?

C in Colorado
C in Colorado
7 years ago

I’m so glad we realize there are OPTIONS for our hair, including wearing it in its natural amazing gloriousness. Websites –like this one (woot woot!) — have done much to raise Consciousness.

Kan
Kan
7 years ago
Reply to  C in Colorado

I agree! This website ROCKS! Thank you BGLH for being such a great resource in the Black hair care community! You have truly helped change the game. 🙂

Amma Mama
7 years ago

I think that’s awesome because we don’t need it. Our hair is perfect 🙂
http://ammamama.wordpress.com/

chinamountain
chinamountain
7 years ago

I noticed some time ago that all the hair relaxer had been moved to the back of the hairstore while the Shea butter, oils and natural hair products were much closer to the front and in larger varieties than usual. Interesting.

Kelly
Kelly
7 years ago
Reply to  chinamountain

Just goes to show the power the Black community has. This was all done through YouTube, Facebook, word of mouth, natural hair conferences, and natural hair websites like this. This small but steadily growing natural hair community is making a billion dollar industry decline! I don’t really like the film because it’s slanted but I think Chris Rock’s documentary “Good Hair” made some of us addicted to relaxers look foolish and his film may have pushed things along, too. Alot of people saw that film and they weren’t all Black. Frankly, I find the film embarrassing even though I haven’t… Read more »

GSoldier
7 years ago

See Ladies. We have ALL the power to demand what we desire and aspire! It’s only a very small community of us and see how much effect we made. Together. As individuals and as Sisters. This is powerful and is only the beginning! We were the force that pulled the trigger. Now all eyes are on us and our race, and we will win. We must win! Praise God! =’) We certainly weren’t ‘inspired’ by the media and let’s not forget that. Ever! When they start ‑and trust me they will- start using a few more ‘natural’ haired actresses, don’t let them… Read more »

Lita
Lita
7 years ago

Sorry to be cynical, but from what I can tell, relaxers have been replaced by weave wearing. And anyway, since I’m not the decider of these things, without knowing whether weaves/extensions have replaced them (and if they have, what kind) is there any reason to take this as a sign of self acceptance? I know weaves are considered a protective style for most, but there seems a lot of assumptions being made about our attitudes, just based on this figure. Sorry!

AnonSince87
AnonSince87
7 years ago
Reply to  Lita

My thoughts exactly. I believe that weave is simply replacing relaxers . There’s been a massive trend toward Brazilian and Peruvian weave much the same way there’s been one for natural hair. I guess the good is that we’re less inclined to use chemicals.

But relaxing is still very normal and will be here to stay (same as weave). I don’t have an ‘issue’ with that per say, I only hope natural hair also remains strong; I don’t want it to become a ‘fad’ as it was in the 70’s.

Knotty Natural
7 years ago
Reply to  Lita

From where I sit here in Florida, weaves have always been popular (I’ve lived here for 11 years now, trust me it’s gotten a lot better)! I don’t think weaving has increased, but I’d like to see real evidence if it has. I’m glad though to see more women in the area rocking their natural tresses!

Kade
Kade
7 years ago
Reply to  Knotty Natural

I think weave wearing has become stationary. it’s just because the demand of Brazilian or Indian hair has increased that its seems as if weave wearing has increased. Whereas keeping your hair free from relaxers or perms; natural, is increasing.
I’m just taking it as a good thing. Wearing a weave is better than relaxing, eventually weave wearing will decrease.….I think.
But hey! I love my weave, but I’m a proud natural first.

Kiera
Kiera
7 years ago
Reply to  Knotty Natural

Yes! I don’t see those lace fronts with fake “baby” hairs any more. I agree it has gotten A Lot better. And I think weave has replaced relaxers somewhat because Peruvian and Brazilian hair matches natural hair the closet without being so out there. I’m glad kinky hair is being bought as well. Many people are not so found of protective styling so I see why the increase.

Stace
Stace
7 years ago
Reply to  Lita

I think its a bit illogical how people will say they are natural but hide their hair relentlessly under someone else’s hair. Yes a weave can be a protective style but why is it that people choose this type of protective style so much more over just wearing their hair up in a bun/pin-up/french roll / cornrows/ twist/ etc. I would rather have relaxed hair that is my hair on my head than wear someone else’s hair in my head. Chemically altered or not at least its genetically mine that seems more natural to me by far. Hair dye (outside… Read more »

smm
smm
7 years ago
Reply to  Stace

Agreed. I hear the phrase, “I’m natural, too, under this! “, more times than I care to count.

TINA SMITH
TINA SMITH
7 years ago
Reply to  Stace

YES I STILL DON’T UNDERSTAND WHAT’S NATURAL ABOUT WEARING SOME ONE ELSE’S HAIR ON YOUR HEAD.

Kade
Kade
7 years ago
Reply to  Stace

@Stace even though you did directly link what u said to me i still want to respond 🙂 *shurgs* I don’t know it’s just less time consuming for me personally, ie. when I get ready for school I just do a quick brush and go, it’s even better when I have in a kinky weave or braids just take of the scarf and go! LOL! but I understand your reasoning, it can be seen as a contradiction. But To behonest it’s just they way I’ve been brought up. I’m one of those kids that in all of their childhood pictures not… Read more »

Belle
Belle
7 years ago
Reply to  Lita

I don’t think weave has caused the reduction in relaxer sales. I have been wearing weaves for over ten years now and I used to get a relaxer in between weaves. Since I big chopped and returned to my natural hair last year, I have only worn a weave once. Most women who wear weaves use some form of relaxer, especially to try and match the weave texture with their own hair. Just this past weekend my hair stylist was complaining that none of her clients use relaxers anymore, they have all gone natural or are transitioning. I think relaxer… Read more »

Knotty Natural
7 years ago
Reply to  Belle

I agree.

Let us be weary of those companies that are now selling ‘all natural’ products to transform your kinks into curls!

Nappy4C Rocks
Nappy4C Rocks
7 years ago
Reply to  Knotty Natural

+1, more and more so called natural companies and relax companies want a piece of the natural pie…they need to get that 26% money back…naturals beware…do your research

SJ
SJ
7 years ago
Reply to  Lita

But I think it’s important to realize that even weave and flat ironing do something that relaxers don’t: they provide OPTIONS, and they are temporary at best. My personal observation cannot speak for every black women, but the majority of naturals I’ve seen who weave it up or flat iron alternate with wearing their hair in its natural state. The point: It’s still a step forward. Overall, I’ve seen few women who go back to the creamy crack. Many do struggle at first and hide behind weaves and flat irons, but so much information about black haircare has emerged in… Read more »

TINA SMITH
TINA SMITH
7 years ago
Reply to  SJ

I NEVER HAD WEAVE BEFORE NATURAL OR RELAXED. AND SINCE BEING NATURAL OVER 2YRS HAVE NOT TOUCHED A FLAT IRON ONE TIME. NOT ALL US ARE HEAD OVER HEELS IN LOVE FOR WEAVE AND HEAT

SJ
SJ
7 years ago
Reply to  TINA SMITH

Tina: good for you!! Never said that all naturals and transitioners were. I was just providing a possible explanation for the rise in the use of weave and flat ironing compared to the past…

Like I said, being natural is about having options. If you want to never use heat or weave, that’s great. If you feel like using heat or weave, also great. As long as hair is healthy, it’s great. Have a nice day.

Barbara
Barbara
7 years ago
Reply to  Lita

I was about to say the same thing except I don’t believe weave is worn as a protective style for most IRL.

-Party pooper

wds
wds
7 years ago
Reply to  Lita

actually i recently ready an article in Instyle Hair that said a Procter and Gamble study found that 50% of black women were natural or going natural. When you consider that 10–15 years ago nearly 70% of black women relaxed their hair, there has definitely been a change.

Lita
Lita
7 years ago

I’ll qualify that, now I’ve read a bit more closely. There is clearly an interest in natural hair (it’s ‘trendy’, etc). I’ll concede that. Would be good to know the percentage increase in those figures too.

Candice
Candice
7 years ago
Reply to  Lita

I don’t think this is “trendy.” I’d rather call it a “movement” or a “cultural shift.” In the 1970s, there was a trend toward wearing natural hair. My mother rocked an afro. The difference was, my mother didn’t know how to care for her hair then and she still doesn’t. So when the “trend” toward natural ended, she went right back to pressing and then perming. It’s the level to which black women are educating themselves, and subsequently their children, that makes this not a trend. My kids will never know getting a perm and I won’t allow it. By… Read more »

cacey
cacey
7 years ago
Reply to  Candice

i second that wholeheartedly. if our kids grew up not being exposed to weaves and relaxers, it would seem just as alien to them as natural hair is for the majority of our race now. i wasn’t allowed to relax my hair growing up, and my grandmother who raised me didn’t approve of weave and extensions. so i grew up knowing nothing but how to care for natural hair. now i continue to shun weaves/wigs and i did horribly when i finally did attempt a relaxer, because natural is all i know, when it gets right down to it. i… Read more »

Sjamie
Sjamie
7 years ago

I think the “mane” point is that women are deciding to Stop putting chemical relaxers in there hair. Even if you don’t like “weave” or braids at least its not a chemical which can seep into the scalp/cranium. Let’s encourage one another and not critique so much.

Stace
Stace
7 years ago

Stretching out the time btwn relaxers is now a big thing, so instead of relaxing every 4 to 8 weeks people are stretching for 3 months to a year at a time. That might be a big contributor as well.

Rochelle
Rochelle
7 years ago
Reply to  Stace

That’s how I began my journey. I stretched my relaxer for 7 months and then I got fed up with the two textures and big chopped.

Hilary
Hilary
7 years ago

This is some what a step in the right direction but is still highly problematic. Not only have 1) relaxers been replaced by weave wearing, telling of how the end of the relaxer days doesn’t mean the embracing of the black aesthetic (as someone pointed out earlier) but also 2) these same companies owned and profited from by white men are creating “natural” hair products and turning probably even more of a profit. Before when we would likely buy $15 relaxer and $10 bottles of conditioner and shampoo (lasting up to a few months depending on your relaxer methods) now we’re racking… Read more »

Candice
Candice
7 years ago
Reply to  Hilary

I disagree with most of what you’re saying. I agree with the part that many of these companies that make black hair products are run by white men, but a lot aren’t. I buy 100% Shea Moisture products, which is a black-owned business. People can decide where the put their money, and perhaps that will be something that continues to evolve as women continue to educate themselves about their hair. I do however believe the aesthetic is shifting. I see too many advertisements lately that include black women with natural hair that aren’t selling natural hair products. It’s used to… Read more »

Nappy4C Rocks
Nappy4C Rocks
7 years ago
Reply to  Candice

I’m curious is Shea Moisture is BLACK-OWN? Sometimes companies go mainstream, then sellout…and you will never know until something slip…Remember Johnson, SoftSheen? used to be black-own…now Ithink Proctor and Gamble own them or some white company.…unless it is publicly traded you don’t know

colorfulkinks
colorfulkinks
7 years ago
Reply to  Nappy4C Rocks

Yes it is black owned. You can go on their fb and ask. The founder‑a black woman- passed it down to her 2 sons who own it now. They even show up at some of the natural hair events in ny. I have a list of all black owned and non-black owned companies on my blog: colorfulkinks.wordpress.com. You can take a look. I contact most of them.

p.s.- I just found out that AS I AM is owned by japanese, shoot. Their ingredients aren’t even natural anyway

Linda
7 years ago

I’m so glad I stopped relaxing this year, I never knew my hair was this nice and I just love all the natural styles that can be done without relaxing 🙂

Candice
Candice
7 years ago

I knew times were changing when I went to the grocery store and saw a huge sales display of coconut oil in the health and beauty section. Ummm…shouldn’t that be in the food section with the other cooking oils? Nope. And ain’t nobody putting coconut oil in their hair but black folks! LOL!

J. Nicole
7 years ago

I agree that the most important portion to take away is that we are forgoing harsh & damaging chemicals; regardless if its self- awareness or not, for many the outcome of a perm is damaged hair. My landlords mother recently opened a hair salon in the basement apartment below me, and for weeks I kept smelling an awful smell that kept giving me a headache. When I finally went to complain (ok, I was going to wild out & assume they were really running a meth lab), I found out it was the smell of perms. It’s been over 3… Read more »

Sana
Sana
7 years ago

Yes. I don’t think this is a trend. We are educating ourselves about our hair and learning how to care for it. I live in Boston there are not too many black folks. I thought I would stand out because of my fro (didn’t know there was a natural ‘movement’ I decided to go natural so I can focus on my Masters in 2012). I was pleasantly surprised to see several black women rocking natural hair. What’s interesting to me is that the women I see fall in the 18–30 age bracket. This is good news. Relaxers can’t be good… Read more »

JENNID
JENNID
7 years ago

Interesting. I do think weaves are replacing the relaxers. If anything is a fad it is the weave movement. Technology has made it so that the texture and the looks of weaves are pretty good. But here is the catch like relaxers they come with a list of horrible side effects too. Alopecia being number one. I’m happy that many are second guessing the chemicals but many trading it in for weave is probably not a step in the right direction if healthy hair and healthy psychology is the destination. While weave has its good points as mentioned by many… Read more »

cacey
cacey
7 years ago
Reply to  JENNID

yeah i can’t fathom the price a lotta women shell out for weave. i’d go seriously broke trying to keep up another person’s hair. couldn’t do it, myself. if you can afford it, i can kinda see the appeal. kind of. but i still think that they do more harm than good, ultimately.

Aree
Aree
7 years ago

So what’s the appeal of the natural style? Forty-eight percent of women believe natural or curly hairstyles exude confidence and the same percentage consider them daring. Meanwhile, 45% of Black women think natural coifs are trendy.”

Um.…it’s my hair. You know, it grows out of my scalp. That’s the appeal. Sheesh, what a stupid question.

LBell
LBell
7 years ago
Reply to  Aree

Agree 100%. People forget that black folks have been on this earth a lot longer than relaxers have been. Natural is the NORM, not the trend. To the subject: As someone said above, I’m thrilled that more black women finally understand that relaxing really is a choice. Back when I went natural I sometimes got that thrown at me, but I never really believed the woman when she said it. I used to reply that yes, relaxing is a choice, and so is NOT relaxing, and both are perfectly fine. Then I’d get the side-eye and that told me the woman’s… Read more »

Lana
Lana
7 years ago

I’m happy that women are starting to embrace their natural hair. At the same time I am worried that once natural hair care becomes so popular, prices for the most basic things are going to shoot way up.

Tracy
Tracy
7 years ago
Reply to  Lana

Girl that day is Today! Lol but really these “natural hair” products are ridiculously priced at times when only 20% actually work for my hair.

Knotty Natural
7 years ago
Reply to  Lana

Yes honey! You are better off experimenting in your kitchen!

Latte
Latte
7 years ago
Reply to  Lana

I’m afraid of that too. My hair is healthy (and looks pretty good) and all my products (very basic) are 9.99 or less. Except for occasional pomade for my edges and henna, nothing I use on my hair is marketed for hair…

Oh wait. I do use kinky curly knot today when I don’t wash in braids (following henna or homemade banana conditioner). It’s my 11.99 splurge. Lol.

Bridgette
Bridgette
7 years ago

Kill the creamy crack campaign is successful!

Monika
Monika
7 years ago
Reply to  Bridgette

Now it’s time to activate Phase 2: Brazilian Hair For Brazilians

cacey
cacey
7 years ago

this is certainly good news, but to be honest.…i still see that the majority of black women seem to wear their hair relaxed. maybe it’s just where i am, but like.…all of them almost in this little community where i live relax. when’s the change going to come to south georgia? clearly the winds missed us.

mochachick10
mochachick10
7 years ago
Reply to  cacey

Come north to Metro-Atlanta; lots of fellow naturalistas here

breanne
breanne
7 years ago
Reply to  mochachick10

Yep. I live in Baltimore and many women here are natural. When I go home to rural NC however, I’m a bit outta place.

stephanieb
stephanieb
7 years ago
Reply to  breanne

I hear ya breanne, I live just outside of Raleigh, and the smaller towns almost noone is natural, but when you go to larger areas like, Raleigh, Durham, Charlotte, etc. it does get a lot better. Nevertheless, the majority of the women I know are relaxed too or wear weaves/wigs, but at least things are going in the right direction.

Francine
Francine
7 years ago
Reply to  mochachick10

I agree! Were here in Decatur,Ga,also. My daughter who is an area Firefighter did her big chop in April,after I cut off the last of my relaxer the same month.

AlllSmiless
AlllSmiless
7 years ago
Reply to  mochachick10

Yeah, Mochachick10 is right. There are tons of naturals in Atlanta.

colorfulkinks
colorfulkinks
7 years ago
Reply to  cacey

come to new york city, especially where all the boho and hippie/black pride blacks are. I went to the Afro punk festival 2 weeks ago and I felt so proud of all of my young fellow natural rockin the hottest/most creative styles I have ever seen.

NaturallyPhoxxie
NaturallyPhoxxie
7 years ago
Reply to  colorfulkinks

I live in NYC too and I missed that. I didn’t even know about it 🙁

DaniGlamMonroe
DaniGlamMonroe
7 years ago
Reply to  colorfulkinks

I wish I lived where there is a more black population. Down here where I live…south Texas…anytime I see another natural I get soooooo excited!!!!
However, I do not agree that natural hair is a “trend”. Relaxers were invented in the last 100 years or so…I think Relaxers are more of a trend.

Brittany
Brittany
7 years ago
Reply to  cacey

Don’t make assumptions. What looks relaxed to you could be me flat ironing my hair for the day or I might have gotten it blown out at the hair dresser.

Chanda
Chanda
7 years ago
Reply to  Brittany

I agree ’cause not all straight hair is relaxed hair. Some people got those good flat irons, too.

Caresscurls
Caresscurls
7 years ago
Reply to  Chanda

I have been natural (no relaxer) for about 4yrs and I continued to flat iron my hair. I did a semi big chop in October 2011 and continued to flat iron my hair. February 2013 I went fully natural no heat no relaxer. Relaxers never really took for me I would always get the same results from a good wash and conditioner. But an arrival that should be written is why black women continue to believe and pass on the lie that to have coily and curly hair you have to be mixed or have good hair.

Kelly
Kelly
7 years ago
Reply to  cacey

I live in the suburbs but sometimes I catch the bus into Philly. While there are many sisters in Philly (and a handful in the suburbs) with natural hair — Afro puffs, curly hairstyles, braid-outs, twist-outs, locs — I agree with cacey. Straight hair dominates. I think what’s happening is that there really are more natural sistas but these natural sistas are either choosing to flat iron or their natural hair is under a weave, extensions, etc. But hey, I’ll take it. I’m happy. Relaxers have a lot of harmful ingredients in them, can cause scalp burns, and the money… Read more »

For the Love of Curls
7 years ago

While more women have stopped relaxing some have switched to weaves and wigs. I’ve talked to women who want wear their hair out but are just lost when it comes to hair care so more education is needed.

Sid
Sid
7 years ago

I hope this report is true. As a man I don’t have to suffer with the issues and pressure that society places on black women and their hair. But I don’t like it one bit. There are a few articles at http://www.blackbuying.com that talk about this issue. The consensus seems to be that the worst part about it is all the money that women spend/waste on these products and the self hate that results.

Shahidah
7 years ago

wow that is exciting news for us, it means that many of us are learning or have learned to love our own hair without chemicals.
I can’t say I’m really surprised though. I was in walmart not too long ago and the shelves once overstocked with relaxers were down to a few brands while more, albeit overpriced, natural hair products were sold.
Can’t wait till the day when most of us figure out we don’t need to pay $50 bucks for Ms Jessie when water and coconut oil will do…the struggle LOL

linda
linda
7 years ago
Reply to  Shahidah

One big thumb up sister, you got it so right!!! I’ve always wonder what’s the hype with Miss Jessie’s. They might work for some but for me, I don’t see why I should pay $50 for products geared towards naturals when they are loaded with petrolatum, mineral oil, parabens, silicones, fragrance (???) and well known EDCs (estrogen and endocrine-disrupting chemicals) like DMDM Hydantoin, Propylene Glycol, Triethanolamine, sulfates and other nasty stuff we are trying hard to avoid when going naturals. These are hormonally-active chemicals found in most African-Americans hair products and are the reason why African-Americans women tends to have… Read more »

Kan
Kan
7 years ago
Reply to  linda

Wow, that’s really good information Linda. I had no clue about the fibroid stuff. Thanks for the insight!

NaturallyPhoxxie
NaturallyPhoxxie
7 years ago
Reply to  linda

I agree. Instead of using silicones to detangle, have you tried detangling with a prepoo? I found this is the BEST time to detangle. Water, coconut oil and a lil bit of conditioner in the hair at least 30 minutes before you shampoo. I have 4b hair and its sooo easy to run a comb through it this way. Lots of slip and no breakage because I gave it time to penetrate the hair and its not sopping wet so it wont stretch and break either. Then wash the hair in sections to keep it detangled.

linda
linda
7 years ago

You’re very welcome Kan. We need to do our research, keep ourselves informed and share our knowledge whenever possible. To NaturallyPhoxxie, thank you for your insight. I do prepoo, that’s my BF and the only way I can detangle. My hair hates wet and dry detangling so I work on damp hair. Straight coconut oil isn’t my friend either, it needs to be mixed with another oil. I’m working on a combination of aloe vera juice or gel mixed with shea or avocado butters, castor, hemp, coconut and grapeseed oils. AVJ/G alone works but the 100% shrinkage I get from… Read more »

linda
linda
7 years ago
Reply to  linda

I forgot to mention that diluted ACV is a habit too. I use it in different ways. It helps in my detangling session and is a must to control itchy and dry scalp, dandruff and smells in long term protective styling. It makes a great drink too.

Gina
Gina
7 years ago
Reply to  Shahidah

I agree. Miss Jessies is such a waste of money. Most, if not all, of their products contain mineral oil, lanolin or petrolatum—inexpensive products—with a very expensive price tag.

Nature Girl
Nature Girl
7 years ago

Over-processing, breakage and thinning of the hair, no thanks…perm!

Pat
Pat
7 years ago

That’s very good news. It’s also good news for those black owned natural hair care companies. I love those.

Megan
Megan
7 years ago

I love that more Black women are wearing their hair natural. However, I’m concerned that the economics of natural hair care is becoming high jacked by those outside of our community. It’s not enough for us to just wear natural hair. We have to be mindful of the economic and political implications as well.

Latte
Latte
7 years ago
Reply to  Megan

Putting thumbs up and hit thumbs down on accident. I’m on my phone. Anyway,
Agreed!

shayshay
shayshay
7 years ago
Reply to  Megan

Remember that saying, “Dance with the one who loves you.”

Shahidah
7 years ago
Reply to  shayshay

I never heard that saying but I liiiiike it!!!

LaNeshe
7 years ago

This is the reason that companies that used to make relaxers are now coming out with lines for natural hair.

Daneh
Daneh
7 years ago
Reply to  LaNeshe

Yes. That is why I am very conscious of the brands that I choose to buy. I only buy products for us by us and will continue to as long as it’s good quality and reasonably priced.

stephanieb
stephanieb
7 years ago
Reply to  LaNeshe

Great point, and many of the ingredients used in these products which are supposed to be so “natural” really aren’t natural at all. That’s why we have to be careful which companies we buy producs from. Even Carol’s Daughter isn’t as natural as it used to be.

DaniGlamMonroe
DaniGlamMonroe
7 years ago
Reply to  LaNeshe

YES! I have noticed every major brand for black hair is now trying to target naturals…I still remain to stick to brands that always catered to naturals or my own homemade products.
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/20130828_175334‑1.jpg[/img]

merry
merry
7 years ago

this is good news.

i prefer baby steps to no steps.

woot! woot!

Chanda
Chanda
7 years ago

Looks like relaxers are gonna be about as extinct as jheri curls are now. This doesn’t mean more sisters are gonna sport ‘fros though. Keep in mind people stretch their relaxers for months and months now as well as use hot combs or flat irons to straighten their hair. I think many sisters just don’t want to deal with the chemicals in their hair at the end of the day.

palcande
palcande
5 years ago
Reply to  Chanda

Sales might decrease for relaxers, but will NEVER be extient…I personally am natural, but I know a lot of women that wont go natural no matter what and thats their choice and a few women that were natural and couldn’t handle all the work and went back relaxed.

nollyA
nollyA
7 years ago

this is an opportunity for black people to be wise and take advantage of the situation.We all know most relaxer companies are owned by non blacks. Since there is a decline in sales,there is a decline in the money they are making and somebody else will get that money.People need to make a conscious effort to channel their money now towards black or predominantly black owned hair care businesses .Come on y’all our people need it. This is not an issue of being discriminatory against other races.It is purely taking care of your own first before others.We need to learn… Read more »

Gigi
Gigi
7 years ago

Now if we can see numbers showing increased numbers for black-owned hair products being bought!!!!!

Omega
Omega
7 years ago

I’m cautiously optimistic. This study doesn’t seem to take into account the fact that relaxer sales could be down because women are not DIY relaxing and going to salons to have stylists relax their hair. While I hope more of us are embracing our natural beauty, I fear that Mintel (which is a global marketing company) may be using this study as propaganda to get us celebrating while working with companies to figure out marketing strategies to get us hooked on their products.

B
B
7 years ago
Reply to  Omega

But wouldn’t that mean salons buy more relaxer to compensate so it’d balance out and not affect the numbers.

Omega
Omega
7 years ago
Reply to  B

Salons aren’t buying relaxers from retail stores. They are ordering directly from companies like Dudley and Mizani. This study is related to sales of relaxers in retail stores.

Shahidah
7 years ago

I remember at least three years back you couldn’t get an Optimum Relaxer under $7 and I have seen them on sale in my area, RI and MA, for $2.99 that says a LOT

linda
linda
7 years ago
Reply to  Shahidah

$1.99 and buy one get one free in my area lol, I was shocked!!!

Chanda
Chanda
7 years ago
Reply to  linda

Shoot for $1.99 those perms are probably dusty and stale anyway.

NaturallyPhoxxie
NaturallyPhoxxie
7 years ago
Reply to  Shahidah

HAHA they are giving them away and I’m still not getting a relaxer.

Tosha
7 years ago

I too live in NC! Right outside of Raleigh! And I agree with Stephanieb. The small town that I live in still isn’t very accepting of natural hair. You see a few naturals, but not nearly as many as when you visit the larger cities like raleigh, durham, charlotte, etc! I bc’d in February 2013 and it was the best decision that I ever made for my hair! I love it! I definitely don’t miss having a relaxer! lol. It’s just a distant memory!

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[…] The research report can be found at Mintel’s site HERE – info via Black Girl Long Hair. […]

shayj1127
7 years ago

I used to live in Kansas City, MO where there was a growing natural hair community and now I am in San Diego, CA where I have seen MANY naturals. It really is great to see!

Salice
Salice
7 years ago

Not arounf here. Most women I see still use weaves and relaxers and heat. Some do have natural hair under their weaves, but seem far more found of their weaves than their natural hair. Although I do see more naturals it seems like some women actually feel stupid about not having natural hair these days, they just seem to be following a fad or the “thing to do”. But all of the Ethiopian immigrants have beautiful natural hair! It’s great.

Slice
Slice
7 years ago
Reply to  Salice

I live in Minniapolis,MN btw

DWare
7 years ago

I think this is the new trend. I have been seeing this for quite a number of years. People are more willing to accept African American hair in the workplace as being “American”. Now we have more natural hair products coming out like Lia naturals, KeraVada http://www.etsy.com/shop/keravada AfroVeda etc. and the Ayurvedic Hair products it just gives more options in think.

Phoenix
7 years ago

Well ladies, y’all might stone me, but I’m still relaxed (having some transition thoughts though). Regardless this is good news, because it means that should I continue to do my touch ups (I’m a DIYer, have been for YEARS) that it’ll cost me SO much less, lol. Especially considering that I stretch for at least 3 months since being on my journey (prior to my journey I was a religious 6–8 week person, I am so happy to be a stretcher now). Currently I am 16 weeks post and I might even stretch to 20 (which is also why I’m… Read more »

Nix
Nix
7 years ago

(Don’t bite my head off, please :-)) A few days ago, a commenter remarked that the level of negativity she found in BGLH’s reader comments had finally pushed her away from BGLH and towards Curly Nikki, where she found commenters to be more constructive. It’s saddening, but she does have a point: some comments here can be amazingly negative. However, it looks like a shift might be occurring. I’ve been following BGLH for about 2.5 years now and this is the first time I’ve seen a topic generate virtually 100% positive comments (so far) AND thought-provoking discussions–a truly united front here,… Read more »

Mica
Mica
7 years ago

I am not usually a fan of “statistics”, but this one is refreshing. 🙂 Slow and steady wins the race. 🙂

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