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Natural Hair Not Hot in Nigeria?

Avatar • Apr 12, 2009


contestants in the 2007 Nigeria’s Next Top Model competition

Ok, I’ll admit it.
I stereotyped Africa. I did.
I thought that on a majority and indigenously black continent, natural hair would be celebrated and commonplace.
For a whole week on this blog, we displayed and discussed styles from “the motherland”, which I guess I kinda put forth as the cradle of natural hair ingenuity.
Which is why I came to a screeching halt when I read this in my interview with Miss Fizz (a native Nigerian now living in Ireland.)

“When I think about it, I realize how sad it is that the United States has a larger natural hair culture than Nigeria.”

Nigerian ladies, if you’re out there, break this down for me. PLEASE break this down…

***update @ 12:01 p.m. Monday… I am amazed at the discussion this post has sparked. I won’t be updating today, so that the post can get its due attention.***

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Jc
Jc
11 years ago

I went to a British school in Kenya and I think two girls(sisters) had natural hair (yep age 3–19 and two girls in a school body of about 250 girls). Both girls had waistlength hair. We always attributed it to past Indian relatives (of which they had none lol).  I agree, natural hair is not popular among urban women. In rural areas, natural hair is the norm and it is usually cut into a short style. A huge afro or bantu knots/knot out would stand out.  Interestingly, I think the reason for this is actually black people in USA (and I mean… Read more »

JacqueRoxx
JacqueRoxx
11 years ago

Unfortunately this is true. Both my parents were born and raised in Nigeria and when I decided to go natural neither of them liked it. My mom always says that a woman’s beauty starts with her hair and she didn’t think my afro was beautiful (I say “was” because it’s in braids now). And a lot of Nigerian women that I know (whether here in America or over in Nigeria) wear wigs. So from my experience natural hair isn’t accepted, at least not in the mainstream.

Black girl with long hair
Black girl with long hair
11 years ago

@ Jc… so then america is the #1 world power — even when it comes to natural hair?! seriously, this is really changing my view of things!

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

when i think about it, i realize how sad it is that the US has a larger natural hair culture than nigeria’.…i could not disagree with you more. there is so much ‘weave’ oooops i am sorry you like to call it protective styling natural hair…i say to each its own

mellowyel
mellowyel
11 years ago

*Sigh — the million dollar question. So this is the way I think about it — others can correct me if I’m wrong. Colonialism meant for Africans a forceful push in the direction of Western standards of beauty: light skin and straight hair. Little black girls in Nigeria, like little black girls in the US, also played with Barbies with long blond flowing hair, and wanted long hair like the people on TV. And like other people have said, when people in the US and other countries created the hot comb, relaxer and bleaching cream, we embraced them, not specifically… Read more »

mellowyel
mellowyel
11 years ago

Another interesting thing: this isn’t the case everywhere — I saw this video over on the blog Jezebel, and it made me SO happy: an embracing of African beauty, even in the midst of war. http://jezebel.com/5193842/in-the-congo-a-bit-of-whimsy-that-cant-be-contained

And I agree with what Jc says: if you happen to have looser curls and/or really long hair, people usually assume you have non-black ancestors.

lsaspacey
lsaspacey
11 years ago

Not Nigerian, just shocked. Also I wish someone would put that version of the show up on YouTube. I would love to see the experience there.

Sugabelly
Sugabelly
11 years ago

So this is a big sigh for me. And I see my friend MellowYel has already commented on this but let me just add my own two cents. To have natural hair in Nigeria is to burn and die. I kid you not. Walking around in Nigeria with natural hair, you won’t get more than twenty feet before some random person that you don’t know from Adam tells you to go do something with your hair “so you can look like a human being” Also if you’re aspiring to work in a bank, you WILL NEVER get work if your hair is natural… Read more »

eccentricyoruba
eccentricyoruba
11 years ago

i’m Nigerian and i also have natural hair. to be honest when i decided to go natural i could only meet like-minded people online.  my family reacted horribly to it telling me that Africans don’t ‘carry their hair like that’ and my reply was always ‘so what were our ancestors doing to their hair before relaxers were invented?’ i’m now in my second year of being natural and what i hear from other Nigerians is that i don’t look Nigerian any longer…apparently i now look Batswana or South African because of my hair.  i’ve not seen many nigerian women with natural… Read more »

BeautyinBaltimore
BeautyinBaltimore
11 years ago

Half African-American half Nigerian here. Yes we Nigerians don’t seem to be that hot on natural hair but that is slowly changing. There is one popular Nigerian actrss whose name escape me now but she has locks.
There is the belief that those with natural hair don’t care for their hair,are crazy etc..

Lita
Lita
11 years ago

I don’t know that getting a job is difficult with afro hair in Nigeria. I have a lot of aunts and distant relatives who wear their hair natural, and as long as its ‘styled’ there isn’t a problem. I think wearing a bit ‘fro might make you stand out (and standing out is the problem), though ironically, I’m sure a big afro wig would be fine. I know that when I was last there, people thought I was from a deeply religious family, and respected as such! The bottom line is that ‘fashion’ is followed to fatal fault. I could go… Read more »

Lita
Lita
11 years ago

South Africans have a different recent history, and my guess is thats influenced the natural hair scene. There are tonnes of locs among SAs I’ve met.

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

This isn’t just true for Nigeria. It’s true for the African continent as a whole. Natural hair is not always celebrated and loved.

danniebella
danniebella
11 years ago

This is very shocking. I can not believe this. It would be great to have a historian weigh in on this.

mellowyel
mellowyel
11 years ago

@eccentricyoruba
so true! getting a relaxer in Nigeria means you’re growing up, moving past the cornrows and threading of your youth and starting to look like a lady. people look at you funny if you’re rocking cornrows or flat twists once you’re like 15, unless of course you did them with extensions so they hang down your back. *Sigh

Ifeoma-Fobi
Ifeoma-Fobi
11 years ago

I am glad you posted this. It is so true and I think my Nigerian sisters have said it all. I am actually from Ghana, also in my second year of going natural and I have had my share of looks of death and unsolicited advice ‘well meaning’ from Ghanaians and Africans living here and back in Ghana. My two cents: Growing up in Ghana, natural hair on a female is has always been linked to youthfulness and adolescence, immaturity and in some cases, if worn by older women, they are automatically considered to be individuals with lower levels of education, lower… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

It’s also the same in the Caribbean (although things are changing). Natural black hair, unless it’s of the “mixed” variety, is frowned upon. I agree with whoever said that black US culture holds some responsibility. Black people the world over copy black people in the US. When things change here, they eventually change the mindset in other places, but that takes time. I believe the natural hair movement in the US will take hold the world over, but it will take a little longer in some places.

Ifeoma-Fobi
Ifeoma-Fobi
11 years ago

” Anonymous said… ‘when i think about it, i realize how sad it is that the US has a larger natural hair culture than nigeria’.…i could not disagree with you more. there is so much ‘weave’ oooops i am sorry you like to call it protective styling natural hair…i say to each its own April 12, 2009 7:05 PM” I disagree with Anonymous on that comment.  You should understand that African Hair (specifically type 4 hair) is not chemically made to survive in the western climate due to the dry and cold temperatures for several continuous months in a year. So protective… Read more »

Aisha
Aisha
11 years ago

I remember my Global Studies teacher in 9th grade (a white man no less) telling us this. He said that a lot of Black women wear braided hairstyles in order to be more Afrocentric, but African women don’t wear their hair this way. He said the African women look at African-American women for hairstyle inspiration. I was shocked at the time as well. This was 13 years ago.

Aisha
Aisha
11 years ago

BGLH said:
”@ Jc… so then america is the #1 world power — even when it comes to natural hair?! seriously, this is really changing my view of things!”

This is what I’ve been told by women from other countries: AA women are natural hair trendsetters! In general, AA sets style in so many ways and don’t realize their impact on the rest of the world.

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

I’m a british born Nigerian who lives in the UK. The natural hair scene was’nt that big when i went to Lagos last year. It is catching on though, the thing I noticed is that Locs are quite common amongst the male population but weaves and braids are so cheap that most women are trying to emulate the western cultures in dress and style. I wanted to get my hair braided over there and my little sis said I hope you told the braider you have natural hair as its not common in lagos. What!!! you mean my natural texture… Read more »

FrizzyFizzy
FrizzyFizzy
11 years ago

I’m going to Nigeria this summer and I’m going to have to braid my hair myself before i get there because I’m going to be working in a bank and I’ll be kicked out if I walk in with an afro or fuzzy twists and also because if I hear one more hairdresser say to me “Aunty your hair don due ohhh, you no go relaz your hair?” I might hurt her.  It is so sad. They have no idea how to handle natural hair at all! In my relaxed days, if I had more than one inch of new growth, the hairdressers… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

i don’t agree with natural hair not being hot in nigeria. perhaps in lagos a lot of people have a relaxer or weaves just like in the states but there are plenty of other places where everyone is natural but just braided up. I’m nigerian and the majority of my family is natural. it’s just a choice and i’ve never had anyone in nigerian say anything about it because they were natural too or simply didn’t care. Obviously if you’re natural and you’re walking around looking a hot mess then you’re gonna have a hard time getting a job… how… Read more »

AGrlCanMAC
AGrlCanMAC
11 years ago

Awesome topic.

I’m AA and I’m really shocked! I’ve been called “afrocentric” since I went natural and it’s interesting that even though I don’t care for that label, it kinda doesn’t ring true!

I also had no idea that AA hairstyles influenced African hairstyles so much. The natural movement is getting larger and larger by the day. I hope that grows larger in the other non US countries as well.

Nicole
Nicole
11 years ago

This discussion is really interesting, here’s my question: How to men in Nigeria wear their hair?

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

ok, wow. im from the jamaica — and i just wanted to weigh in about the caribbean side of things. in jamaica we are losing our cultural heritage, people everywhere are killing themselves to look like americans. they hold the US as the standards of beauty, seriously women walk around with light skinned faces and dark skinned bodies! As for hair, if you have natural hair u r automatically thought to be a christian, poor, have no fashion sense, or from the country (if ure mixed it is not cool to wear your hair natural). i once saw a 2… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

Wow. I am truly shocked. I really need to do more research on Africa because obviously I don’t know a thing. Like the blog writer stated, I too had more indigenous pictures in my head of certain parts of Africa. A lot of people here in the US think all Nigerians and South Africans have very thick and coarse hair, yet are accepting of it, and think that all Egyptians, Somalians and Ethiopians have thick,long and curly hair. There are many natural stereotypes here as well. The most recent one I heard is that women who go natural are extreme… Read more »

Jc
Jc
11 years ago

lol!! All my Nigerian friends used to refer to my hair as ‘due’ before they realized, it is going to be ‘due’ forever. 

I think it comes from hair being due for a relaxer, or due for braids or something other than being natural.

Loolalooh
Loolalooh
11 years ago

Interesting post and I agree with many of the responses. I’m Nigerian as well. As a new natural (1 year now), I get constant heat from parents — “When are you going to relax your hair?” or “When are you going to get braid extensions?” As if to suggest I should hide my natural hair.  I want to be optimistic and say that if women in Nigerian knew the true versatility of natural hair (twistouts, finger coils, etc.) and how to care for it better, then they’d be more inclined to be natural.  Part of me feels that this natural… Read more »

serenissima
serenissima
11 years ago

Anonymous said…
Wow. I am truly shocked. I really need to do more research on Africa because obviously I don’t know a thing. Like the blog writer stated, I too had more indigenous pictures in my head of certain parts of Africa. 

April 13, 2009 1:19 PM

this makes me terribly sad. there is so much stereotyping going on here! its just as bad as saying you still have an image of Africans as running around in loincloths with spears hunting lions and tigers all day

Black girl with long hair
Black girl with long hair
11 years ago

@ serenissima… i definitely think your indignation at the stereotyping is righteous, but i do want to make clear that my stereotype of african women wasn’t that they were walking around bare-footed and killin tigers and shit.

my stereotype was of natural hair being common and celebrated among african women… 

k, let the discussion continue 😉

The Notorious Z.A.G.
The Notorious Z.A.G.
11 years ago

This is a very interesting post!! I too was under the impression that natural hair was thee thing in different African cultures. Every article/photo I’ve ever seen has given me information to support that. I mean, I knew about the nightlife and fashion scene and such, I hate to be completely ignorant but again, any images I’ve seen always left me under the impression that natural hair was/is the majority amongst most African cultures.But, that’s all “they” (and we all should know who “they” are) want us to see, and its messed up that the media can be controlled to… Read more »

Jc
Jc
11 years ago

Plus tigers are not native to Africa!

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

We need to arm ourselves with more information. Change is not going to happen in a day. We are all affected by what we see in the main stream media. I am happy to a guide to people back home in AL about natural hair. Change will come it only a matter of time.

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

Sad to say, it is so true that most Americans, black americans, know zero about Africa. It is sad that many are ashamed of their roots. We have to change that. It is also sad that the only time we see images of Africa, it is more on the National Geographic level, so I guess that is where the idigenous thinking comes from. Maybe not as far as the loin cloth and zebra spearing, but definitely things like small huts, no indoor plumbing, and men with several wives. I know it’s really awful but it is true. Americans rarely think… Read more »

Toye
Toye
11 years ago

I was very excited to see this post and the dialogue started. I am a US Born Nigerian and my parents HATE my natural hair. My mother is slowly just accepting it. However my Dad says repeatedly my hair looks unkempt.  My cousins talk SOOOOO mch trash about how I need to take care of my hair (Mind you mine is healthy and growing) While theirs is relaxed to no end ( which I have no issue with relaxers except they have overprocessed dry and broken off and colored hair. Yet still relax all three strands of their hair every… Read more »

SistaOpinion
SistaOpinion
11 years ago

Gotta cosign those who say that AAs know next to nothing about Africa. I’ve said for years that for ignorance about other cultures, AAs are more AMERICAN than they realize…and I’m saying this as a native-born AA. Johnson Products was selling relaxers in parts of Africa starting in the late 50s and early 60s. (That coincides with the poster who described her 70-something grandmother perming since she was 18.) Ebony was there before that if I’m not mistaken (Essence didn’t crop up until the early 70s, I believe). WE (AAs) are the ones who taught African women how to look… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

This discussion is interesting, shocking and so disheartening. I’m beginning to see that natural african hair is treated the world over like a birth defect, almost as bad as a cleft palate or club foot — something that needs to be corrected in order to have a normal life. I’m a fan of the old Twilight Zone movies and I remember an episode where a young girl was being pressured by everyone (her parents, friends, even doctor) to undergo this cosmetic procedure where she would be transformed into her pick of one of two “looks” — beauty ideals — and… Read more »

mellowyel
mellowyel
11 years ago

I’m talking with Sugabelly right now, and she mentioned something that I thought I should put out there: When we say African American women have influenced Nigerian styling, we specifically mean black women in the mainstream media, i.e. Hollywood. So when Diana Ross was rocking the fro, so were we. And when Beyonce rocks the blond lacefront wig, so do we (though apparently she’s natural underneath). I’m hoping that as natural hair becomes more accepted in the US, the same thing will happen back home.

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

First, let me just say that this here is the BEST EVER natural hair blog that has ever hit the web! Real conversation, real intelligent, on all the real time-praise God! Second, Amazing Topic! This is sooo keeping it real. On the carribean side of this, I am a US born Haitian woman and the bottom line is this: this thing has got to be everywhere-not just in Nigeria. I remember my last visit to Haiti about ten years ago, it was like this; the maids, dwellers of the country side, the uneducated, the poor, and the devout christian, these people… Read more »

serenissima
serenissima
11 years ago

Anonymous said… I’m a fan of the old Twilight Zone movies and I remember an episode where a young girl was being pressured by everyone (her parents, friends, even doctor) to undergo this cosmetic procedure where she would be transformed into her pick of one of two “looks” — beauty ideals — and she fought so hard to resist the pressure because she just wanted to look like herself, but in the end she gave in.  April 13, 2009 8:38 PM its called ‘number three looks just like you,’ and its one of my FAVE episodes (im a huge twilight zone freak… Read more »

Alicia
Alicia
11 years ago

I’m an American-born Bajan (family is from Barbados) and I would also like to weigh in on this topic. When I went home last year I wore my natural hair (for the first time). I’ve been natural all my life, but I’m usually braided up when I go to Barbados. It seemed to me that as long as you have curls and not kinks, no one says anything to you. I actually got compliments on my hair and one of my mom’s friends thought I had a weave (I guess the curls were extra big that day)! I saw a… Read more »

LivingGolden
LivingGolden
11 years ago

Is it fair for us to blame the media/slavery/whites for our dislike of our hair? Aren’t we the main ones continuing to perpetuate the hatred when it comes to black hair? I don’t get negative comments on my curls from non-blacks. Just the opposite. I’m told often by non-whites how beautiful my hair is. The only negative comments I get come from black people. Non-black people aren’t the ones teaching our girls how to hate their hair (and skin). The people closest to them (parents, siblings, friends, family) are the ones doing that. From my viewpoint, the media/advertisers seem to… Read more »

Gaia
Gaia
11 years ago

Let me first write that I’m a big fan of this blog, and lurk often! Big wave to all the sistas in the global village (waving like a mad woman). I think much of the transition away from natural hair in Nigeria has been over the last 3 decades. I think it has little to do with colonialism and a lot to do with American influence, specifically, as others have stated African American influence. As a Nigerian I have noticed that my mother’s generation wore their hair natural. I have pictures of my mom as a young woman and here hair… Read more »

lmgregory
lmgregory
11 years ago

Hello, I really enjoy checking into your blog. I’m late to this really good discussion, but I do want to add my two cents. First, I’d have to agree with all of those who have pointed that out African-Americans, i.e. those born in the US (b/c technically all blacks on this side of the world are African-Americans), tend to know very little, if anything, about how black folks throughout the diaspora experience and see the world. So many of the tensions that exist, for good or bad, between different Afro-descended people can come down to groups assuming that we must… Read more »

Style Noir
Style Noir
11 years ago

“Let’s take off our dashikis, stop burning that incense, stop using vague diasporic language and discuss this!” At last, someone’s suggested this very necessary exercise. Afrocentrism is as American as apple pie. But I digress. Just came back from visiting family in Liberia; I’ve never seen so much weave– bad, bad weave– in my life.  I began relaxing at age 9 or 10. My Filipino mother was very easily swayed by her (Black) friends to sit me in a stylist’s chair because– not in spite– of the luscious, wild head of hair I had. And while I’ve been blessed with length… Read more »

Style Noir
Style Noir
11 years ago

Oh– and I almost neglected to mention the two toddlers I spotted on my SN Brussels flight back home with weave on their heads.

I was horrified and deeply saddened.

Jae
Jae
11 years ago

I’m Jamaican, moved to the U.S. a few years ago and I recently did my BC. I can only speak from what I know and that is natural here is still sort of a taboo back home esp. afros; most prefer to loc. I remember when I told some of my friends I was going natural they asked if I was crazy, there were others who were supportive, but most acted as if I had gone off the deep end. My mom was not too thrilled but I think she’s coming around, esp since she had to shave all hers… Read more »

Laurel
Laurel
11 years ago

great topic! methinks long overdue..:)..if someone had told me 2 years ago that I would ever go natural in my life, I probably would have thought they were crazy..but here I am today, loving the hair God gave me..As a Nigerian woman, I would definitely love to see more acceptance of our hair..I can count on one hand how many people I knew who had natural hair and did not hide it.. lol@ “Aunty your hair don due ohhh, you no go relaz your hair?” funny but so sad and true..Will be going home for the first time in a while..my dad… Read more »

Lushous
Lushous
11 years ago

I feel the natural issue in African countries is a rather complicated mix of modern American influences, convenience and traditional ideas. To break it down: natural hair in and of itself is considered acceptable ONLY if it’s in protective styles like braids, because this is the traditional african way of styling women’s hair. Afro’s, dreadlocks etc are western hairstyles that were in Africa in the olden days only associated with the mentally ill, who before there were institutions to put them in, would be roaming the streets and were incapable of washing or combing their hair. So protected natural hair… Read more »

Chrissy Toluwa
Chrissy Toluwa
11 years ago

I’m Nigerian Also, but my experience with natural hair in Nigeria is quite different. In primary school most people had natural hair, including myself for a while but I think that’s because it was irresponsible to relax a child’s hair, although I had relaxed my hair at primary/grade 4 I believe (not too sure). Anyway, the people that had the longest hair in secondary school (grade 7–12) were natural. These girls had long bra strap length hair and even longer (I have three girls in mind) the rest were like shoulder length and a handful were quite short. I felt… Read more »

Omonaija ;o)
Omonaija ;o)
11 years ago

Another Nigerian weighing in here. I did the big chop down to 0.5″ two months before going back to Nigeria and no one bothered me about it. My aunt lamented the fact that I had chopped all my hair off, but I wasn’t harassed to relax my hair. I was in Abuja, and I saw plenty of natural hair and natural hair styles, along with lots of relaxers, weaves, wigs- with the latter outweighing the former. I think the issue about relaxers , weaves and wigs has more to do with fashion than it has to do with self-hatred for… Read more »

Omonaija ;o)
Omonaija ;o)
11 years ago

Another Nigerian weighing in here. I did the big chop down to 0.5″ two months before going back to Nigeria and no one bothered me about it. My aunt lamented the fact that I had chopped all my hair off, but I wasn’t harassed to relax my hair. I was in Abuja, and I saw plenty of natural hair and natural hair styles, along with lots of relaxers, weaves, wigs- with the latter outweighing the former. I think the issue about relaxers , weaves and wigs has more to do with fashion than it has to do with self-hatred for… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

Just to point out that Africa has 53 countries, if natural hair isn’t accepted in Naigeria that’s one thing…it is not an accuret picture of all of Africa.

eccentricyoruba
eccentricyoruba
11 years ago

Just to point out that Africa has 53 countries, if natural hair isn’t accepted in Naigeria that’s one thing…it is not an accuret picture of all of Africa.’

I second this which is why i shared my experience on being taken for a woman from southern Africa because of my hair.

Sugabelly
Sugabelly
11 years ago

Just to point out:

1 in 5 Africans is a NIGERIAN.

I think what Nigerians think is more than valid since we represent ONE-FIFTH of Africa.

Just pointing out.

Jc
Jc
11 years ago

Sugabelly,I must disagree with you and side with eccentricyoruba. This is also a statistic — 1 in every 5 people in the world is Chinese. 

I completely agree that South Africa is a different ball game. Natural hair does not have as much stigma attached to it. For every natural, you find a relaxed head and they co-exist. Nobody would hurl insults as they do with Iffy in Nigeria for having natural hair. 

Africa is diverse and some places are doing better than others with regards to natural hair.

modupe
modupe
11 years ago

Agree with Sugarbelly, 1 in every 5 africans is a Nigerian.. That country has over 120M people as at last census. I am nigerian too, but Yoruba thats from teh ousth western part of the country. Hair isn’t all that back home, having a relaxer is just one of those things. Some folks wear their hair natural but they are very few and far between. I miss the different cornrow styles and didi( another type of cornrows). Did was my favorite style.I also agree with previous posters about the fact that afros (except Twa’s),twists, coils are not common place in… Read more »

Robby D
Robby D
11 years ago

Why am I the only one from the US NOT shocked?..Think about it. Who do they put on pedestals over there? The chicks with the long silky hair, so of course they would want to mimic that.

Simple.

I’m confused as to why people believe that it would be celebrated.

Wow lol. There is so much I want to say, but I cant. I just cant…

Great post.

Bombchell
Bombchell
11 years ago

(side eye) Its not that serious. regardless of ethnicity, with black girls lots of people with 4a/4b hair, perm their hair or get weaves whether they are in africa , usa, or uk. You should ask yourself why you expected Nigeria to be different from any other African country, or even the UK, or US. styles changes, trends change, fashion of the day, globalization, media etc. Are you seriously kidding me??????? this is such an insulting post! more because of what you assumed, and expect from a country you are not even familiar with, because it’s in Africa! the motherland,… Read more »

Black girl with long hair
Black girl with long hair
11 years ago

@ Bombchell… the whole point/objective of the post was to get a clearer view of Africa, beyond stereotypes. And it’s not just American chicks who are surprised that natural hair isn’t hot in Nigeria. If you read through the comments, several Nigerian women express their disappointment that natural hair is so unpopular. And it’s not a matter of us not wanting people to try different styles. People can do whatever they want with their hair. It’s the fact that many of those in Nigeria who try natural styles are ridiculed and discouraged by others.  I would encourage you to read… Read more »

thelady
thelady
11 years ago

The gist of this seems to be that Black women in other countries do not wear their hair natural because Black Americans straighten their hair. This makes no sense to me. You have your own culture, cities, predominately black populations why would you not look there for your trends. There seems to be some abdication of responsibility. Black Americans are such a small percent of the world’s Black population, I just don’t see how they can have a bigger influence over your beauty standards/trends than your own culture.

Maya G
Maya G
11 years ago

old post, I know, but I wanted to comment! I’m from London (uk) and I’m less shocked by the revalation that Nigeria has less natural haired peeps but more shocked that Americans don’t realise the impact that America has on the rest of the world! I mean, wow!
Popular culture is near by dominated by America even though other countries have their own vibrant cultures and nuances.

DATJUICYBABE
DATJUICYBABE
11 years ago

Wow, I just know in Africa, the natural beauty was uplifted… how I know so little about my heritage. But I am trying to get better and cut this slave mentality.. white is better.. because sometimes one may have this ideology and dont even know it… I must add, I have a interesting story to share with you all, a prime example of slave mentality being passed on from generation to generation … my neice, maybe 10 at the time told me once…“I want to go to my white grandmother house.. ” now keep in mind… my mom is fare skin… Read more »

kiara
kiara
11 years ago

Hey, it´s not just the hair.…Do you know how many Africans especially West Africans bleach their skin? You have no idea! About the hair, I was in Kenya 2 yrs ago, and even in the rural areas they are now straighteneing their hair. I even saw relaxers in a supermarket I went to. That was unheard of before, but not anymore. Beauty to a lot of Africans is light skin and straight hair. And that´s the truth. May God help us.

Ade
Ade
11 years ago

I have just read all the comments on this post twice and I am one of those Nigerian women with short natural hair. I grew up in Lagos (one of the big cities in Nigeria) but I now live in London. I have really thick, kinky, “stubborn” natural hair and growing up in Nigeria, it was a complete nightmare. I got insults and abuses from everybody who handled my hair, including my own mum. “I don’t know where you got this horrible hair from” she would say. It hurt really badly. She gave up trying to plait my hair when… Read more »

Nneka
Nneka
11 years ago

This All-Nigerian girl loves this blog! I just started reading it 5 days ago and I wish I knew about it much earlier 🙁 I cut off my 3 yrs old natchy about 11 mths ago! it was beyond my shoulders but grossly unmanageable so I hid it under braids most of the time. I just couldn’t find the right info as to what products to use to keep it soft and stylable. One of the reasons I actually decided to go naturally was cos I was going to be very busy (and broke.lol) in graduate school so I wanted… Read more »

Bonifant
Bonifant
11 years ago

Oh wow Ade I feel for you. I hope you continue gaining more information about how to handle your hair so that you are happy and that your husband can see the natural you is just as beautiful.
Are there any natural salons that do natural hair maybe you could take a break from doing it yourself sometimes and request a style or carry a reference pic of someone from fotki or other natural hair websites.
I wish you luck AND strength to continue to do what is right for you.

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

americans seem to take a delight in being the more influential culture. im nigerian and my decision to go natural has nothing to do with watching black americans. personal choice is what it is, and these choices are sometimes guided by the dominant ideas where one resides. i wont say nigerian women are trying to be western, i would just say that they(salons, our mothers) do not know how to take care of natural hair, and this is what makes living with it here un heard of, and unwelcome… if we trace it back then maybe we can ‘blame’ african… Read more »

ArmyBrat
ArmyBrat
11 years ago

I completely agree with TheLady (above) and had the exact same thoughts regarding the abdication of blame while reading the comments here… In regard to BombChell’s comment, I’ve lived in Germany and in France for much of my adult life, but I am US born (East Asian/African descent). Let me reassure you, the grouping of those of African descent does NOT work outside of the US.  People of African descent can usually be identified as to their exact origin on site (overseas). This is something that surprised me as an American, because I am used to the ignorant (though well-meaning) grouping… Read more »

Omo Oba
Omo Oba
11 years ago

This is a discussion that we need to to talk about more so thank you BGLH. A lot has been said that I agree with. Thanks for bringing up the “dada” issue, Mellowyel. My story is a lil’ different. My sister and i had natural hair (boy-cut style) all thruout pry and sec. sch in Lagos because my dad believed (then) that having to braid/relax our hair was too much distraction away from our studies. My sister and I used to hate it so much — and we believed that our parents were denying us the joys of being a… Read more »

COCOA J
COCOA J
11 years ago

Us born Naija Igbo… put off by your comment about a Dashiki… I think that’s E. Africa… Different countries with different ethnic groups call articles of clothing different things. Please educate yourself. On to my comment:I always had the long straight relaxed hair growing up and was praised for it. When I cut my hair short 2 years ago I was questioned by elders I don’t even recall meeting, and now that I’m transitioning, I’m ignored.Most of my mom’s friends wear wigs or weaves and always comment about her hair [she has relaxed hair past her shoulders that is thick].… Read more »

AyamVenus
AyamVenus
11 years ago

I think Nigeria is a poor place to look at when you are talking about the attitudes towards Natural hair in Africa. I lived there long enough to feel very strongly that the majority of the so-called ‘happening’ Nigerians won’t be happy until the Queen declares Nigeria an annex of the United Kingdom (or Obama and the United States???). I’m very touchy about this topic, because everything that I hear my family boast about when it comes to Nigeria is always some idea that was imported and embraced to the detriment of something homemade (e.g. Yoruba religion, herbal medicine). So… Read more »

Sugabelly
Sugabelly
11 years ago

J: Dashiki is still wrong. It is Danshiki, and it is a HAUSA article of clothing. In East Africa clothing similar to Danshikis are called something COMPLETELY DIFFERENT. Remember everyone speaks different languages so to say that East Africans would call a Danshiki danshiki is ridiculous. It would be a completely different word in Swahili or Shumom or whatever. Danshiki is a HAUSA word.

There is nothing like Dashiki.

Shi Kenan!

Christmas Jones
Christmas Jones
11 years ago

I’m half Ghanaian, half Afro american. When I lived in Ghana for two years of my adolescent life, I saw everyone with either a perm, or a boy cut…aka, short hair cut close to the head.  I remember one day putting temp dreads in my hair. My Ghanaian aunto told me flat out “you look like a mad woman.” When she took me another time to the hairdresser, they tied my hair up in black string. I can’t describe it, it was a really weird style for me, but its a native style. The same aunt told me, “do you know… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

I’m Nigerian and i just started transitioning about 6 months ago I’m still in sec. school so whenever i go to get my hair cornrowed the first thing out of the braiders mouth is ” your hair is due . wont you relax” , when i tell them i dont want to relax my hair anymore they look at me like im crazy. I asked my mom if i could cut off my relaxed ends and she firmly said ‘no’ like it would be an abomination to have short Afro hair. Ive seen improvement though there is one salon i… Read more »

Naija Barbie
Naija Barbie
11 years ago

Well, when I went to Nigeria last year, I saw alot of girls of natural hair and that was one of a few things that contibuted to why I was going natural, ANYWHO, people who have natural hair in Nigeria are mostly young girls but they have to get it cut regularly because of school rules and blah blah blah. Once you get out, it’s all weave, extenstions and everything. Matter of fact, alot of girls in Nigeria DO have natural hair. It was basically all I saw. But people who have perms or relaxers are thought of like to… Read more »

Naija Barbie
Naija Barbie
11 years ago

Oh and BTW, I really think that we need to fix the “Dashiki comment”. I veiw that as a sterotype against africans kinda. They’re not called dashikis everywhere. Lord knows how many different languages there are in Africa and in one of the many, dashiki probably is the correct term but in general, no. You can say head scarf or whatever but it’s not a dashiki in general. I’m from africa and idk what a dashiki was until someone showed meh.

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

What a person decides to do with their hair is up to them. I think its important that consumers of perms, wigs and other hair “care” products are aware of the ingredients and health risk that these products could possibly cause. I just pray that once the fascination and concerns of our hair fade that black people will focus more on our health.

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

“Oh and BTW, I really think that we need to fix the “Dashiki comment”. I veiw that as a sterotype against africans kinda. [sic] They’re not called dashikis everywhere. Lord knows how many different languages there are in Africa and in one of the many, dashiki probably is the correct term but in general, no.” Oh come now, enough with the “Dashiki” fixation. It seems obvious to me that the author was not stereotyping Africans of any ethnic group, but Black Americans (African-Americans) who call themselves the “Diaspora,” and who wrongly (but fondly) mythologize people of “the Motherland” as having… Read more »

Sugabelly
Sugabelly
11 years ago

@Anonymous: Actually the Diaspora refers to Africans who live abroad, not African Americans or anyone else.

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

@Sugabelly,“Actually the Diaspora refers to Africans who live abroad, not African Americans or anyone else.” Actually: a literal and first-wave understanding of “the Diaspora” refers to “the movement of any population sharing common ethnic identity who were either forced to leave or voluntarily left their settled territory, and became residents in areas often far remote from the former.” (Source: Wikipaedia.org”; simple, but succinct.) In this instance, however (as stated above), the author seems to refer to the ‘African Diaspora’ in particular; i.e., the individuals involved in the initial population movements >and< their culturally ‑identifiable/-affiliated descendants. In the instance of this… Read more »

Sugabelly
Sugabelly
11 years ago

Anonymous: I see what you mean, but Africans in the US generally DON’T identify themselves as African-American.

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

@sugabelly: You apparently missed the “and” in my previous comment. Reposted (with emphasis): “The ‘African Diaspora’ in particular; i.e., the individuals involved in the initial population movements [e.g., African slaves] »>and«< their culturally ‑identifiable/-affiliated descendants [2nd generation+ (so-called) ‘African Americans’]. In the instance of this blogpost, it is assumed that the author is speaking from (and to) the perspective of persons who see themselves as that sector of the African Diaspora who are at home in the U.S. (i.e., self-identified ‘African-Americans’).”

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

“To have natural hair in Nigeria is to burn and die.” So I guess those working class educated and successful Deeper life, Apostolic Faith, some assemblies of God, some redeemed, some adventist etc women and their daughters are burning and dying? I cite these churches only because they have HUGE followings. Plus the non religious natural sophisticated women I know . You may not see them because their hair is mostly in braids, Ghana weaving, or sade style. What about your regular chick in the village? I know a lot of young girls in the village/cities who will not perm (they… Read more »

Sugabelly
Sugabelly
11 years ago

@Anonymous: Did you not see where I said that Nigerians associate natural hair with backwardness, childhood, immaturity, poverty, OVER-RELIGIOUSITY, etc???? And yes, to have natural hair in Nigeria is to burn and die. Those people that follow all those churches in Nigeria with natural hair are labeled. And what we are trying to fight against is getting labeled by greater society just because you wear your hair natural because the greater society sees those labels as negative whether or not they really are. That is the reason why in Nigeria when you’re walking down the street with natural hair a… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

I am not going to do this with you on this blog.Why? I only wish you peace and love. I have influenced AT LEAST 15 women to go natural in my inner circle with love and encouragement.What is your record? P.s. I have never witnessed a natural bashing,as you call it, so call me a liar. I reiterate your limited contact of Nigerian women,because you assume I only know a handful of non religious naturals.Why only a handful? Maybe because YOU only know a handful?Your perceptions are clearly not mine and that of a lot of Nigerians so lets agree to… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

I grew up in Nigeria and moved here when I was 9 (this was in 1995). I was natural the entire time I was there and so were most of my friends my age. Maybe I wasn’t aware but I did not notice women walking around with weaves on their heads. I mostly saw braids or maybe pressed hair. My mom recently went back and noted to me how many women were walking around with wigs and weaves in their heads and I was somewhat alarmed. I’m guessing it’s a recent trend and I hope it does stop, it’s really… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

By 95, weaves were for people who knew about it and could afford it. Most people just braided their hair,with the various options or relaxed their hair.

Weaves started gaining a little ground around 1990/91. Back then it was a few track sewn in, blended with relaxed hair and styled to resemble the woman’s hair.People still do it today.

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

I’m Nigerian-American and my mom hates my hair, but many of my aunts love it. My mom is the queen of weave on. I just chalk it up to her being Americanized/white-washed living in this country. It really is hard to avoid.  Missing from this discussion is the fact that Nigerians who have migrated come to the U.S. and emulate the styles they see here and then go back home to visit. They are seen as hip American-based Nigerians. So they too show Nigerians what it means to look upwardly mobile. My relatives are very cognizant of this and make sure… Read more »

Amina
Amina
11 years ago

I’m Nigerian and I agree that natural hair isn’t very popular. I don’t really think it’s all colonization’s fault. If you look at our pre-colonial art and sculpture no one was wearing an afro just out or dreads which in most Nigerian cultures are a sign of madness or being unkempt (i.e. the not combing the hair). There were braids and twists and thread styles. African-Americans ideas about what is African and what actually IS African are very different. The Nigerian people I know with natural hair are rarely doing it to go “back to their roots” or to “do… Read more »

Sugabelly
Sugabelly
11 years ago

@Amina: “If you look at our pre-colonial art and sculpture no one was wearing an afro just out or dreads which in most Nigerian cultures are a sign of madness or being unkempt (i.e. the not combing the hair).” This is untrue/inaccurate. First of all, there are scores off pictures of precolonial Nigerians with natural curls and afros. Have you read George Basden’s Among the Ibos of the Niger? It is full of pictures of people with afros, natural curls and other hairstyles. It was the EUROPEANS that taught Nigerians that not combing your hair was dirty/unkempt, and that dreadlocks… Read more »

Zara
Zara
11 years ago

I hate when people make ignorant generalizations or think that natural hair connects them more to “Africa”. What is that??? Seriously? The whole natural hair business is more taboo there than it is here and only people with curly hair really tend to wear it natural but even then, they still feel uncomfortable in their skin. Even with the pictures you posted bglh, I’m not even gonna lie… that was pretty ignorant considering the fact that those were TRIBAL pictures and because Africa is quite westernized, they dont represent the culture much at all. We may still celebrate our culture… Read more »

Zara
Zara
11 years ago

Oh and also… I just realized that I am a huge exception with my hair… my mom and sister are as well. My fam lives in Abuja (I think they moved, lol) and I think that has something to do with them looooving my hair. Like, they loooove it… no joke, lol. My one nigerian cousin who has lived in kentucky all her life though loved my hair but thought hers would be ugly and said I had asian in me.… WHAAAAT?!?! lolol, that’s ridiculous XD! We have the same line down to our grandmother =P! It is only split paternally.… Read more »

Sugabelly
Sugabelly
11 years ago

@Zara: There was nothing wrong with her posting those pictures. Just because most Nigerian cities and towns are fairly westernized does not mean that millions of Africans don’t live in every day tribal settings. Even in Nigeria in the villages there are LOADS of people that still wear all their traditional clothing, still worship all the gods, still celebrate all the festivals, and still do all the traditional hairstyles with their natural hair. Sure, in Nigeria IN PARTICULAR they are becoming hardER and hard-ER to find, but that does not mean that these people do not go about their business… Read more »

Zara
Zara
11 years ago

@ Sugabelly Lol ^_^, I may have been kinda harsh but that’s only because, I don’t want ppl to go on thinking that Africa is one sided and primitive. I looooove my culture and I love what my tribe has given to me <3. Lol, if you had read the rest of my message, you would have known =P. I myself admire tribal images and I love wearing traditional to special occasions (ex. church, nigerian functions/conventions, parties) wayyy more than I love western. I respect my culture and I respect what it has given me. I just feel as if… Read more »

mo
mo
11 years ago

Basically agree w/ much that’s been said. Won’t say too much more (LOL). I was born & raised in TX but I’m a Nigerian. I transitioned and BC’ed in 2004. As has been stated, most of the naturals are young girls. But, in the larger cities, especially Lagos, a woman is considered “bush” or “village” or “local” if she allows her hair or HER CHILD’s HAIR to be natural. That’s right, people are relaxing their 3+ y.o. girls’ hair. A mess! And it looks it! Very sad. When I was in Nigeria in 2007, my older cousin who’s 40 saw my hair… Read more »

Foxycleopatra
Foxycleopatra
11 years ago

@ mo,

I think the other high profile nigerian woman u r thinkin of is Ruth Benemesia-Opia. I loved her flava. She was a very popular newscaster/show host. Didn’t know she had gone into publishing/business (if she is actually the one u were referring to).

Lalla
Lalla
11 years ago

Hi, I’m from Mali, and the vision of hair there is quite different than it is in Nigeria. Malians are very proud of their history and culture ( most African empires, Songhai, Mali, Ghana etc took their roots there). Being westernized ( they call it assimilé) is not a desirable thing there. Nonetheless, some women do bleach their skin, and many in cities relax or use weaves/wigs. Still, there is a huge variety of hairstyles (including the afro in some cities of the North where men and women sport huge afros), and most people would not wear a westernized hairstyle… Read more »

MissyD
MissyD
11 years ago

People tend to forget that when the slave trade happened and we were all brainwashed by European Masters, they were also fuckin up Africa. So yes a lot of African girls do have permed hair. Oprah actually will not allow her girls to get perms due to the high maitenance. But I was in the African Students Organization at my old college. Out of a fairly large, predominetly female organization I think only four of us had natural hair. Most of them gave my friend and I the cold shoulder because of our hair, staired at my head, or asked… Read more »

tara
11 years ago

I grew up in Nigeria and the US. My parents (both academics) did not allow me to relax or straighten my hair until I got to University. I resented it immensely having to go through high school in Madison Wisconsin with natural hair, but I am so glad for it now because it taught me to understand and be comfortable with my hair. I now live in a small town in the UK with no access to African-Caribbean salons. I have been natural now for almost 5 years and will never go back. Went home to Nigeria recently with natural hair and… Read more »

Igbo Kwenu
Igbo Kwenu
10 years ago

Recently, I watched a talk on youtube (I think) given by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the acclaimed Nigerian author of “Purple Hibiscus”, “Half of a Yellow Sun”, and “The Thing Around Your Kneck”. The title of the talk was “The Danger of the Single Story” (or something along those lines) and its theme was that human beings often base their knowledge and/or perceptions of others on a single story culled from a limited source. The single story of Africa is what sparked this thread, i.e., as a place where only “natural things” are allowed including hair, where everyone lives in abject… Read more »

Yoruba Tani
Yoruba Tani
10 years ago

I read your article and was intrigue to leave a comment as well. I recently came back from Nigeria (Victoria Island) and I see an abundance of natural and women who wear weaves. In this day in age African culture has been mended with western cultures alike. People tend to forget Naija was British Colonized so a lot of ways we have adapted from European cultures. I am natural and never had a negative stereotype plague me when I went back home. Naturals are widely accepted in Nigeria. Is it the norm now, that is debatable. I feel that trends… Read more »

Jennifer
10 years ago

I am not nigerian but heres my perspective, one of my closest friends is a freelance model(NYC), she is almost very deeply into this industry and i have met many people through her (models, photographers, etc) NYC is a big giant pot of networking so being in the fashion industry period, you’re gonna be dealing with every aspect and meeting people from every strand(I am an aspiring stylist). Theres a running joke about the nigerian models of the NYC fashion scene. ONE is that they never date within their race, you always see them strolling down the streets of soho… Read more »

Ursula Kratt
10 years ago

Nice!, discovered your webpage on digg.Glad I finally tried it out. Unsure if its my Firefox browser,but sometimes when I visit your site, the fonts are really small? However, love your site and will return.Bye

yaya24
yaya24
10 years ago

I am Nigerian American. I grew up in a household (in America) that frowned upon natural hair. Both of my parents grew up in Nigeria and I know from viewing my mother’s photos that she did have natural hair growing up.. I guess times have def changed.. My mom was outraged when I (at 24 years old) came home to visit rocking my once Arm pit length relaxed hair now big chopped to 1 inch and natural. March of 2009 I went home to Nigeria to visit (this was my first adult visit. My last time there I was 16… Read more »

Ndidi
Ndidi
10 years ago

Hey! I’m so happy i stumbled upon your website, i think it is so helpful. I am a Nigerian woman who recently moved to London from Nigeria(lagos). About 2years ago i decided to cut off all my hair, i had been thinking about it for ages but never had the guts. I finally cut it when my hair stopped relaxing and always had a curly half inch at the bottom. The reactions i got from people varied quite a bit but the main one was disbelief. Noone could understand why i would choose my curly “unmanageable” natural hair instead of… Read more »

Victoria
Victoria
10 years ago

I am Nigerian, and grew up in the Uk,I staarted realxing my hair about 11 years old, I stopped, then started again a about 15 years of age. I’m now 19, and have been having conversations with my brother- he’s been encouraging me and my sister to go natural- as this is our god- given har and that we should embrace it. I never had a problem with natural hair, but when I did go natural at 15, I remembered the reasons why I kept on realxing it in the first place ( the pain of handling it! the time… Read more »

aJwitaFrO
10 years ago

I believe the reason why natural hair is frowned upon in Nigeria is because Africa is going through a “modernization” phase that doesn’t just include stable access to electricity and internet but also social and cultural “modernization” as well. Actually, you could call this more of “Americanization”. Anything from the western world is upholded is as better than anything African and since most of the Media that exposes North American culture in Nigeria displays women with relaxed hair and weaves, natural hair is frowned upon. Relaxers and weaves have become a regular part of modern African culture the same way… Read more »

aJwitaFrO
10 years ago

I thought I would add this in because it directly pertains to this article and it also kind of gives an “inside”/ everyday look at the attitude towards natural hair in Nigeria:

http://www.curlynikki.com/2010/07/when-are-you-going-to-relax-your-hair.html

the article is from Curly Nikki, stumbled across it today, how ironic 🙂

Jolie-LDN
Jolie-LDN
10 years ago

Strangely enough when I first discovered this site I realised that there were a lot of Nigerians who were natural than Ghanaians 🙁 … On another note im finding it difficult to convince my aunt to go natural; when I first told her I was going natural she said to me well your hair is curly so it will look good on you surprisingly I got the same response from everyone I told :/ …so far I only got a friend of mine and her sister and my mums friend to go natural.. I think some people maybe reluctant because they think… Read more »

KoralK
KoralK
10 years ago

I am a Nigerian, born bred and brought up in Nigeria, currently living in Nigeria (Port Harcourt) and every day i see other Nigerians with natural hair just like mine. And underneath most of the braids and weaves/weave-ons u see going around, alot of the ladies are natural. By the way, who cares if u want to apply relaxer to ur hair until it stretched within an inch of its life. It all boils down to choice. One lady likes to wear make-up, another lady prefers the “natural” look. one lady attaches long artificial nails…another lady grows hers out. One… Read more »

Julia
Julia
9 years ago
Reply to  KoralK

In my opinion, you’re allowed to feel sadness over a wide range of issues 🙂 I feel sad (yes,I do) that I have to place this annoying weave over my head because I want to look ‘presentable’ and ‘refined’ to get this job. If our people embrace the versatility and beauty of natural hair, then it would be a grand delight. Btw, we all don’t have to use carol’s daughter, and the likes. The adage says ‘cut your coat according to your cloth (not size)’, so for those who can’t afford the shea moistures, CD, AOHSR etc, Shea-butter, coconut oil, black… Read more »

Julia
Julia
9 years ago
Reply to  Julia

Correction: *braiding the hair*

maria
10 years ago

i always wanted to wear my hair natural even when i lived in Nigeria for the following reasons, tired of the burns those relaxers cause and secondly all the home grown stylists who kept complaining” your hair too strong ‚e no dey relax on time” who cares to be made to feel like what you have naturally growing from your head is bad!black women irrespective of our nationality should embrace what God has given us.We didnt choose our hair our hair chose us;for a purpose(for us to celebrate our strength ‚freedom,victory and beauty through the pains of slavery or colonization… Read more »

Ugoma
Ugoma
10 years ago

I am Nigerian American, 19 born in Nigeria, came abroad when i was 10 now live in Philly. I think the reason that a lot of Nigerians are not natural is because the Western culture is a very big part of the way we live, we adore everything about America from the food to the language, if perming our hair makes us look a bit more American thats what we will do. i know it makes no sense but you have to understand that we are a developing country so not everyone has the access to learn about the benefits… Read more »

Treacle
Treacle
10 years ago

Everyone has said it already. There are many reports, articles and what nots, Nigeria is extremely developed in terms of how its people relate and can blend in with the rest *ahem* the western world, like you can find Chinese people in every country in the world, you can also find Nigerians. Nigerian of not, black women just want to look like what is idolised as an attractive or good looking or fashionable young black woman. This unfortunately is repeatedly publicised by the West and Europe as the beyonces, the kelly’s, there are no more Moesha’s, and Jill scott doesn’t really… Read more »

Treacle
Treacle
10 years ago

*notify*

Obi
Obi
10 years ago

It is a choice we all make. I remember when I was about 6 or so … I wanted to have my hair permed or at least blown out but my mom refused. My reason? All the big “Aunties” were doing it. I waited till primary 6 and decided I wanted my natural hair chopped off because short hair looked so good then. I had to relax the hair when I was in the JS 2 cos the women who did my hair in the local market complained that it was too thick and not very long and would charge… Read more »

NappyLola
NappyLola
8 years ago

This is funny cos I live in Nigeria (Lagos) buh I spend most of my holidays outside Nigeria and I’m planning to leave for school in a month (outside Nig) *u knw why* anywhu! I went for a forum for ladies today organised by my church and all I had in my head was “I need to spot a lady with natural hair and rocking it on purpose”. We all know hw the story ended yh? No? Well I went home disappointed!! Most ladies were rocking “brazilian weaves” or braids with their egdes totally relaxed and gone!!!!! I’m always on the… Read more »

Air Jordan 1 Shoes
8 years ago

Dead written articles, Really enjoyed looking through.

Leta Casagrande
8 years ago

The good ideas to becomegood way to realize that other individuals have the same eagerness like mine to know the truth a little more related to this problem. I am sure there are thousands of more enjoyable sessions ahead for people who find out your blog post..

CALC
8 years ago

Some genuinely nice stuff on this web site, I enjoy it.

dionne
dionne
6 years ago

Its hard to comment when there is no link to read about-apparently to access the discussion you have to be a member lol.

Tabatha
Tabatha
6 years ago

Yeah but don’t you worry cause in a few years they will go back. They do what the States do and what black celebs do, so if enough of them go natural then they will too. Its not for the right reason, but sometimes you have to take a win as a win.

Oye
Oye
6 years ago

Hey Ladies! I’m proudly Nigerian & I’ve been natural for just over a year now. I believe this site is meant to support women who’ve decided to go natural & not oppose those who don’t. It’s not a trend here but it’s not as negative as it has been presented to. I think people should be allowed to make their choices as it suites them.

Laila
6 years ago

I agree with oye.. People should be left with their choices. I am Nigerian by birth, Live in Lagos Nigeria and i have been natural for a year and 4months now. Nigerian Ladies are realizing how amazing their natural hair can be and lots of girls have taken bold steps to Big choppp-ing and starting over with proper tener care and love.

http://www.leylarhcadne.com

Kay
Kay
6 years ago

I am a 16 year old Nigerian American and I can honestly say that Nigeria’s mentality with natural hair is that you have it as a child but once you reach adolescence or adulthood, its either relaxed or hidden away in weaves. especially when in the schools, you are supposed to have cornrows. i haven’t been to Nigeria in near 3 years, but from what I hear from others who have went and such straight hair and soft hair is always optimum and people will make fun of your hair if it’s not. I never had that problem since i… Read more »

Wivyne
Wivyne
6 years ago

It’s all the same here in Rwanda, people find it weird that I rock my natural hair..And now that i want to BC, they all have these horrified faces
But this time i am determined to do it.

Ruth
Ruth
6 years ago

Hello, I was delighted to have stumbled on your article which describes the perception and attitude of Nigerian towards the natural hair. Please do not be too shocked by your findings because being a Nigerian and having had my natural hair all my life, I can attest that it is true. Coming from a conservative Christian environment where women were taught to wear their natural hair, I grew up with the perception that having my natural hair was closely tied to my religious affiliation and this was the view of many people around. Our inability to understand the mystery and science… Read more »

Mona
Mona
6 years ago
Reply to  Ruth

”.…Having personally experienced the struggles of maintaining the natural hair, I have a strong desire to partner with interested institutions to enlighten our people back home, especially on the natural hair.”

Get in touch. I’m trying to put together such an initiative.

Ruth
Ruth
6 years ago
Reply to  Mona

Hello,

Did you get my email about a week ago? I wonder if I’ve got the right one as I had used the one on this page. If not, how can I reach you please?

NaturalV
6 years ago

I am a Nigerian and i live in Abuja Nigeria, i have been natural for 2 years and 4 months. I must say i have experienced a lot of reactions when it comes to hair. Most people are surprised that any one past adolescence age should be wearing natural hair. The first question i always get is how do you comb it? is is not painful? Did your church ask you not to perm your hair? Some people are polite and some are not. Some people feel they have a right to tell you how to wear your hair and even… Read more »

Dreamma
Dreamma
6 years ago

They copy African-Americans. When they see that natural hair is “in” they’ll copy that too. Has nothing to do with their mentality, the ones that have weaves just emulate Black Americans. There’s plenty of women who wear their natural hair in Nigeria, there’s also several tribes, so just because someone from the Hausa, Fulani, Igbo, Yoruba, etc.. tribe says something, doesn’t mean its true for all, because there are certain tribes *cough cough* that idolize westernized culture.

Oye
Oye
6 years ago

Sometyms, I feel we act defensive coz we’ve chosen to go natural. Nigerian women who went natural coz of religious beliefs did so coz dey viewed relaxing it as a sin, not bcoz they loved their hair in its natural state, hence they couldnt style it in a desirable way. The major obstacle is the fact dat Nigerian women havent been provided wif sufficient information on how to care 4 their natural tresses & how glamourous our african hair can actually look. My stance on the issue however remains that the owner of the hair should be left with the… Read more »

Hayleigh
Hayleigh
6 years ago

I’m from South Africa and it’s quite frowned upon for women to wear their natural hair here as well. Especially Coloured (Mixed) girls. Although, that is starting to change with the younger Generations. I started transitioning to Natural hair 2 years ago and eventually I was so tired of hearing my mother and friends saying things like: “You look so ridiculous”, “I would never make myself suffer like that” and “God didn’t make your hair to be worn naturally, it’s not going to grow.” that I gave in and relaxed. It was my biggest regret and so I’m back on… Read more »

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