Skip to main content

Black Women Clocked Out of Work at 2:07 to Protest Unequal Pay on #BlackWomenEqualPay Day

Avatar • Aug 1, 2015
Via http://www.atlantawomenforequality.org/

Via http://www.atlantawomenforequality.org/

The issue of unequal pay for women has captured the national conversation, and Atlanta Women for Equality is leading the charge behind the #BlackWomenEqualPay movement. On July 28, 2015, participants were encouraged to clock out from work at 2:07 pm and upload a selfie to Instagram, Twitter and Facebook while holding a timecard with the #BlackWomenEqualPay hashtag.

BWEPDTimeCard-cropped-e1437759202946

Why 2:07PM?

2:07 p.m.—the time (64% into a regular 9–5 workday) that the average Black woman would leave work to account for the typical wage gap if she were paid at the same hourly rate as the average white man

This unequal pay cuts across socioeconomic lines;

Black women working as physicians and surgeons make 52¢ for every dollar paid to their white, non-Hispanic male counterparts.
Black women working as customer service representatives make 79¢ for every dollar paid to their white, non-Hispanic male counterparts.
Black women working as personal care aides make 85¢ for every dollar paid to their white, non-Hispanic male counterparts.
Black women working as construction laborers make 86¢ for every dollar paid to their white, non-Hispanic male counterparts.

Folks on Twitter and Instagram of all backgrounds organized to boost the conversation of wage equality:

https://instagram.com/p/5sIpHgj-EZ/

https://instagram.com/p/5sFa30Dv0L/

Check out this nifty infographic for more facts on how the wage gap leaves black women at a disadvantage:

BWEPDInfoCOL

Did you participate in #BlackWomenEqualPay Day? What are your thoughts on the wage gap?

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
3 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Ajah
Ajah
5 years ago

I really appreciate the non-blacks posting pictures. Thanks for the support. Women in general don’t get paid what we should, but it’s sad that blacks and Latinos get the lowest.

Claudette UK
Claudette UK
5 years ago

That women of other races posed in solidarity for their black sisters is beautiful. The continued discrimination and unequal pay is disgusting.

k.h.
k.h.
5 years ago

Honestly the non-black women selfies are what touched me the most. I actually teared up. Its nice that women of other races can recognize the injustice and try to make a change.

3
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x

Shopping Cart