Skip to main content

Shea Moisture Faces Backlash Over Use of White Children in Online Ads

Avatar • Feb 24, 2015

Shea Moisture usually trends on social media because of their infamous BOGO Free sales that cycle through stores like CVS, Walgreens, Target, and Ulta. This time around, the brand has come under the scrutiny of “Black Twitter”, the social media machine.

On February 23rd, Shea Moisture posted this photo and caption to their Twitter account only:

We have a problem…” @SheaMoisture via Twitter

Shea Moisture’s social media management has since removed the photo, but the response outrage still remains:

In response to the uproar, Shea Moisture released this statement via Twitter this morning:

We came across an image of a little girl with a puzzled expression that we imagine our #SheaFamily has when they run out of product, so we shared it with you. No ad. No agenda. As a certified minority-owned business, we are so proud of our heritage, our community and how far we’ve come — from a village market in Sierra Leone, to the streets of Harlem, to retailers throughout the U.S. With your support, we’ve been able to bring change, diversity and variety to retail. We hope you continue to join us in celebrating how the versatility of our products can help people everywhere.

Some followers were a little more forgiving, supporting the brand’s decision to expand their marketing base: “Post whatever you want. Increase your market share. Most of us get it and wouldn’t ever dare question GROWTH.”

Meanwhile others still forged ahead with an alternate perspective:

Shea Moisture’s products have been a pillar in the natural hair community, with many citing their effectiveness on our uniquely textured hair. The brand’s decision to select Janell Stewart (Kinky Curly Coily Me) and Jessica Lewis (Mahogany Curls) as their brand ambassadors comforted many naturalistas, as it re-affirmed Shea Moisture’s values and primary market. Most importantly, it demonstrated that they were paying attention during the whole Carol’s Daughter debacle. Their posts on Twitter represent a stark contrast to the aforementioned. It is worth mentioning that the ads are essentially focused wholly on Twitter, and are largely absent from Facebook and Instagram.

Have you seen the Shea Moisture ads on Twitter recently? How do you feel about the new dynamics of their Twitter marketing?

Avatar

About Christina Patrice

Born, raised, and living in Los Angeles, Christina is BGLH's resident transitioning expert and product junkie. In addition to loving all things hair, she is a fitness novice and advocate of wearing sandals year-round. For more information on transitioning, natural hair, and her own hair journey, visit maneobjective.com. Or, if you like pictures follow Christina on Instagram @maneobjective.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
102 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Alisa
Alisa
5 years ago

I think its a ridiculously trivial issue, IMHO. Shea Moisture isn’t exclusive to Black, natural hair. If it works for hair that is naturally straight (i.e. White people’s hair), then why not use a little White girl in their ad? I wonder if people would have been as outraged if Shea Moisture used a Hispanic or Native American child in their ad? We have bigger things to get upset about than seeing a White girl in a hair ad.…

EllieLo
EllieLo
5 years ago
Reply to  Alisa

No. People probably wouldn’t have been outraged to see a Hispanic or Native American child in their ad. Probably because their people probably have as little representation in the beauty industry as we do compared to the vastly white majority (probably even less, if we’re going to talk about Native Americans). The point isn’t that people are banning white people from or outraged at white people for using SM products (they’ve been using them for years. SM has good products that can be used by everyone), but that SM itself is “selling out” by playing up to a population that… Read more »

Elodie Careme
Elodie Careme
5 years ago
Reply to  Alisa

It is true Shea Moisture isn’t exclusive to Black natural hair. But let’s be honest one second with products compose with Shea Butter or JBCO you must admit that their core target is the curly, kinky, coily community. I believe when a community is responsible for your growth and success you have to pay tribute to it and respect it. I lived in France where theaters refused to broadcast “Best man 2” because the casting was entirely african-american and so “not représentative” enough of the viewers. So we black have to deal with all kind of movies, ads etc where… Read more »

Lovely
Lovely
5 years ago
Reply to  Alisa

Spoken like someone who really just doesn’t get it. It’s just another case of a company building their brand on the hard earned dollars of black women only to abandon us when they get a little bit of media shine, as if our dollars aren’t just as green or just as almighty. Carol’s Daughter did the same thing and look what happened …bankruptcy. If you don’t “get” why people are upset then you are just being willfully ignorant.

Please
Please
5 years ago
Reply to  Lovely

And you sound pathetic. “Abandon ndon us”. Why the hell do we need coddling. Please!!! I have my self esteem and worth with or without ‘corporate sponsorship”. I say this for our own good. We need to grow out of this childishness

ijs
ijs
5 years ago
Reply to  Alisa

Carols Daughter, same argument…that is all

Tabatha
Tabatha
5 years ago

So what they are telling me is that they couldn’t find a black little girl with a puzzled look on her face and then take the picture with their celphone?! I don’t buy the product anyways (it doesn’t agree with my hair), but I really don’t buy the reasoning.

Cee
Cee
5 years ago
Reply to  Tabatha

They weren’t looking for an picture, they came across and and basically made a meme with it because of the little girls expression.

Jaye
Jaye
5 years ago

I find this ridiculous. Not just for the fact that people are in an uproar over a picture but for the simple fact that Shea Moisture sells more than just hair care products (which can be used by anyone, of any race). They also sell skincare products and an entire children’s line, both of which are not limited to the “ethnic” section in stores like Target and Walmart. Seems like people are looking for reasons to be offended.

mlank64
mlank64
5 years ago
Reply to  Jaye

Exactly!!!!, not to mention…it makes business sense to widen your audience. Their in business to make money, just like everyone else.

Staci Elle
5 years ago
Reply to  mlank64

I still think its sad that black companies do this. Because mainstream ( white) companies do not. For example, I know many sisters who love herbal essances products and they do not use black women and their advertising. Doesnt stop us from buying it though, It should be the same for whites. They are free to use Shea moisture but do they really have to cater to them above their main consumer base? No! but we always fall victim to this. Example Carols daughter, I used to love it, but when she started focusing on the mainstream ( read white)… Read more »

#5
#5
5 years ago

I’m almost close to renaming TeamNatural the KinkMafia, always picking on somebody smh. How could the same community who appreciated a business for catering to their hair needs turn around and scrutinize who they make their products appealing to? Are they implying that SheaMoisture now needs to pull a Michael Kors and not make their products appealing to all? #TooSensitive

Antrelise
Antrelise
5 years ago
Reply to  #5

No. No. No. I don’t buy it. How can they possibly think that posting a blonde little girl would be largely received well? I just don’t know why a Black owned company would basically claim “ignorance” .…..oh, we just saw a picture of a cute little girl who happened to be white.…we didn’t realize.……blah blah blah!!! I’m not saying that they should not have posted the pic, but they shouldn’t act like they don’t understand the racial aspect of it.

#5
#5
5 years ago
Reply to  Antrelise

Even so, the point being made is…what is it to us how they conduct their business? Who are we to tell SheaMoisture how to make their money? There is no racial aspect to it, they did nothing wrong. People need to simply get a life. It’s never personal, it’s just business.

Nappy4ever
Nappy4ever
5 years ago
Reply to  Antrelise

#truth, I guess I need to invest DYI cause these companies are not here for us

AdinaKay
AdinaKay
5 years ago

The Internet Outrage Machine strikes again.
This was a gross overreaction.

kia
kia
5 years ago

Two words: carols daughter.

Shalsy
Shalsy
5 years ago

I live in the UK so I probably won’t see the advertising that Shea Moisture produce on mass like the US. On an individual/business level, well done for expanding, taking advantage of a wider audience and bringing in the money. They should be applauded for their work ethic and achievement as it’s something we as black people don’t do enough of (supporting). However, in terms of the black (natural hair) community as a whole, this is probably one of the steps in the elimination of our contribution. The problem isn’t with there being a white child as part of marketing,… Read more »

Blair
Blair
5 years ago
Reply to  Shalsy

I believe you made an excellent comment especially bringing economics into it. First, the Natural Hair Movement is a game changer, economically and culturally, because one, Black women, not only in the US, but all around the world: Brazil, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, French Guyana, South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, France, UK, Sweden, Australia, even in Japan, are returning to their Natural Hair, and have built a space/platform (which I am working to build globally to connect everyone) and many those in the movement have become successful entrepreneurs, whether they are bloggers, vloggers, started making products from their kitchen and now have… Read more »

maralondon
maralondon
5 years ago
Reply to  Blair

You said it better than i was going to say it. I love SM products, i have been using them for some years now and i’m from the UK. I am disappointed by the advertisement as the kind of image they have used i honestly do not think is a very healthy one for our impressionable little girls and boys.

Guest
Guest
5 years ago

wow

Anisa Glover
Anisa Glover
5 years ago

I’ll still be buying there products. Just like that one lady said. They could have put a picture of a dog there and I’d still buy it.

Bigantic
Bigantic
5 years ago

This is a cute little girl.
I personally think that the backlash caused by something as insignificant as the child’s ethnicity is a bit alarming. 0_o

Nappy4ever
Nappy4ever
5 years ago
Reply to  Bigantic

Why?

OXxo
OXxo
5 years ago
Reply to  Bigantic

If SM didn’t want a backlash they would have found a child with brown hair, brown eyes and clearly curly hair. That’s what marketers do when they want to appeal to all demographics.

PMS
PMS
5 years ago

I justdon’t get why successful companies owned by minorities are so quick to crossover. Meanwhile Loreal and Maybelline still selling the same two coffe and caramel shades w the token black model. Puzzles the hell out of me.

Dee
Dee
5 years ago
Reply to  PMS

Thats how you make the beacoup cash…you expand into a market with more consumers . White people in America make up a big chunk of the u.s. population, while blacks occupy about 13%. As a business man, you want more people in the market with your products. For black people, that means expanding…meanwhile, whites don’t need to because they already appeal to the masses and blacks will still by and support businesses that make no effort to include them. But I get what you are saying… I love SM and I want them to become a big popular brand, but… Read more »

shytiscrazy
shytiscrazy
5 years ago
Reply to  Dee

Black people generate multiple billion dollars a year in beauty. They have been doing fine they have free promotions from natural hair vloggers on youtube. Bottom line is many black own companies feel like they haven’t made it until’ they have an open market for all. Carol Daughter once was black owned and eventually marketed to all races and now the company is bought out by I believe Loreal. I love Shea Moisture way before the hype but there is too much competition out there for them to start this bs. But I’ve seen it a while ago on their… Read more »

Jacky
Jacky
5 years ago

My view may be controversial but I’ll say it anyway. Black hair is very different from the hair of other races and thus has its own specific needs which may be lacking in the hair-care products used by other races. I don’t feel offended by the picture, especially if it was just a harmless meme, but I do feel concerned about what it could cause. It’s not a new thing for black-owned hair-care companies to shift their focus from blacks to other races and, in the process, alter the ingredients used. I don’t want SheaMoisture to pull a ‘Carol’s Daughter’… Read more »

Brown Girl
Brown Girl
5 years ago
Reply to  Jacky

agreed.. shea moisture is just that shea…moisture meant to put the moisture back and seal in our hair that so desperately needs it where as white people are the opposite even the thick curly haired ones. so they would not be able to accompany all races because we all have very different needs.

Nappy4ever
Nappy4ever
5 years ago
Reply to  Jacky

SheaMoisture is on the path of Carol Daughter only a matter of time…if people think they are still black owned with that advertising…well oh well

OXxo
OXxo
5 years ago
Reply to  Jacky

Unfortunately marketing indicates the way a company wants to go. Larger brands e.g. Dove often include people of colour as they want everyone to buy their products. Smaller brands obviously miss this trick.

nylse
5 years ago

this is sensationalism at its best.

Mercy
Mercy
5 years ago

There’s no way SM’s social media person is this oblivious. I mean, the backlash was almost unbelievably predictable.They did this on purpose to get free publicity from Black Twitter.

Elodie Careme
Elodie Careme
5 years ago
Reply to  Mercy

I’m not sure this is a good way to have publicity from the merciless Black Twitter..

Rini
Rini
5 years ago

Not only is their oblivious marketing strategy offensive, but it’s plain odd as well. I don’t understand why Shea Moisture would even try to target White women, a lot of whom usually remark how heavy the SH lines are on their hair. I know this isn’t true for all White women (and that SH sells more than just hair care products), it’s just based on the numerous accounts I’ve read online. It makes sense for companies like DevaCurl to appeal to a broad market, but Shea Moisture’s heavier, oilier products would usually fair better for people of color with kinkier,… Read more »

Cee Cee
Cee Cee
5 years ago
Reply to  Rini

Shea Moisture also make skin care (adult & baby) products so even those who won’t use their hair products might love them on their body. The body stuff is pretty amazing!

Rini
Rini
5 years ago
Reply to  Cee Cee

Yes, I know! Their African Black Soap bar and and Raw Shea Butter for skin in particular are fantastic. 🙂 Makes my skin feel like buuuuuutterrrrrrr

EllieLo
EllieLo
5 years ago
Reply to  Rini

My thing is that I know MANY white people who use SM products. Why? Because their hair is thick and curly! That’s it. Seriously (even though this little one is as cute as a button) if the little girl they used had was white but had thicker, curlier hair, it would’ve still ruffled feathers but it would’ve made more sense! She would look like a girl who could benefit from Shea Moisture products. And yes, yes SM likes to say that their product lines suit everyone, but most detractors from the brand (black, white and everything in between) state that… Read more »

Rini
Rini
5 years ago
Reply to  EllieLo

Good point! That poor little girl would have, like, two strands of hair left if it were slathered in SM. If you’re going to use a White person, focus on their hair. They’d better have some angry unruly curls. Otherwise SM (where the heck did I get “SH” from?) is getting a serious dose of side-eyeing.

And no I haven’t tried their scrubs yet! They’re on my list to pick up next!

monitano.com
5 years ago

So long as our black sisters continue to understand the importance of supporting black businesses, and upholding the image of the proud black person, starting with wearing their hair natural and free of wannabe-caucasian-features-madness, we can get somewhere.

M.com
M.com
5 years ago
Reply to  monitano.com

Good grief you are an idiot! So once again black women have to do everything. Typical!

monitano.com
5 years ago
Reply to  M.com

M, the struggle of the black woman which your comment implies does not exist in a vacuum. It exists right alongside the struggle of black men, the struggle of the black family, the struggle of black businesses, the struggle of the black community… Black women’s responsibility to themselves and to the empowerment of their little girls calls for wearing their hair natural, let alone their responsibility to the community (as in, presenting themselves as self aware, self respecting individuals who are comfortable enough in their own self to NOT seek chemicals, heat, other people’s hair, manufactured hair, to hide their… Read more »

MalagasyGirl
MalagasyGirl
5 years ago
Reply to  monitano.com

Uhm…so basically you’re saying ALL black women should wear their hair in their natural state? If a person has straightened/chemically treated hair, they’re ashamed of being black? Come on people…really? Both are beautiful and people should feel free to do whatever they want with THEIR HAIR without being judged or looked down upon. Come on now, dont turn natural hair into a sectarian “organization” it’s just a choice xoxo

monitano.com
5 years ago
Reply to  MalagasyGirl

Hi MalagasyGirl! Wearing your hair natural is not a choice. Just like breathing is not a choice. Only through a thoroughly effective program of mental as well as outward slavery/colonization have black women come to see wearing their hair natural as an abomination. It is great that so many black women are now coming around to appreciating their hair again. But let’s not fool ourselves. It is not a choice. Rather, viewing ‘non-natural’ hair styling (consisting of everything BUT our own hair: from fake hair to other people’s hair, to chemical straighteners/texturizers, to heat straightening/ heat training, and on with whatever… Read more »

Ama
Ama
5 years ago
Reply to  monitano.com

Excellent post! Quoting Ngugi and everything!

Jasmine W
Jasmine W
5 years ago

I’ve only seen shea moisture hair products in the “ethic” section of stores, my target takes it a step further an divides that section into relaxed and natural. Now as for their body products.…

Mercy
Mercy
5 years ago

What I mean is, Black Twitter talks about it, gets everyone worked up in a tizzy. All publicity is good publicity, I guess. The point is, there’s no way they didn’t think about race before posting this. The outcome is just too predictable.

Nappy4ever
Nappy4ever
5 years ago

oh yes, she is too cute, absolutely adorable

M.com
M.com
5 years ago

Our people don’t understand business which hurts them.

M.com
M.com
5 years ago

The people who are complaining do not understand how business works. That is the problem. You are correct! A business cannot continue to market to the same group and stay profitable. Look at companies whose main products were relaxers. When the natural hair movement kicked off those companies took a beating. They stayed with the one demography (relaxer users) and are going broke in the process.

OXxo
OXxo
5 years ago
Reply to  M.com

You both seem to think people aren’t economically literature.

If you are a company with an existing customer base of mainly one ethnic group and you are expanding to include another ethnic group, you don’t just ignore the existing customer base. You ensure that both groups are included in your adverts.

I have seen both large companies and small businesses do this. Many make up brands, especially not the cheaper ones, ensure they have one or two non-White models while my hair stylists have put both black and white model’s pictures in their window.

BlueCornMoon
BlueCornMoon
5 years ago

I’ve seen reviews on Amazon & other sites written by white women who use some of “our” products such as Blue magic, WGO, & Hot Six Oil; I’ve also seen them in Target buying Shea Moisture. Why such a big deal so long as SM keeps making great products? Many black women rave about “white” products like Aussie Moist, Garnier Fructis, Pantene ( I used to use Pantene years before the Relaxed & natural line & so did a lot of my friends), Giovanni Direct, Aubrey Organics, & Nexxus because THEY WORKED ON OUR HAIR. SM makes great products &… Read more »

I Think Like Marcus Garvey
I Think Like Marcus Garvey
5 years ago

Bye Felicia and bye Shea Moisture. Utterly ridiculous that they feel the need to be inclusive towards whites. Whites are the most crybaby race, whining over things they have no business whining over. I get the whole “they’re expanding their business”, but there’s clearly something deeper here and it’s been massively felt.

I’ll instead switch my business over to BLACK women on Etsy.com who hand make all of their products for a decent price. A simple search brings up hundreds natural hair products made by Black women, for Black women (only).

Really????????
Really????????
5 years ago

Get over yourself. It’s okay to support black businesses but you can’t dictate who the business markets to. I WANT black businesses to have the widest market possible. Am a bit salty today but your post makes nonsense

Dee Hines
Dee Hines
5 years ago

I was actually put on to Shea Moisture from a white woman on an Amazon message board almost six years ago.Their line has always been inclusive, attempting to accommodate all hair types. It’s one thing to stand up for the minority interest but it’s another to not even know about a company and cause undo tension when none should present. They aren’t dropping minorities like hot potatoes. They are clearly expanding their business and becoming more main stream. I’d be more concerned with the changes in quality, and pricing that came along with that newfound popularity, over their advertising which… Read more »

Ama
Ama
5 years ago
Reply to  Dee Hines

Black owned businesses are few annd far between so in order to help my brother’s business I will pay a little more instead of paying it to someone else who more than likely wouldnt buy water from me if he/she was on fire. Shea moisture should be inclusive nobody said it shouldnt but the image of blackness and our skin and hair should be dominate in my opinion and for my dollars. And I love how people are talking about expanding the market but forget there is a word called globalization. Shea from shea trees in Africa(Sofi Tucker) over fifty… Read more »

Tiffy Jay
Tiffy Jay
5 years ago

This IS a joke, right?! People are enraged because of this innocent ad with an adorable little girl. You are imposing the same hatred on white people as white people have done for centuries now. As a forward-thinking black woman, I can say that it is that frame of mind that sets us back to when we weren’t allowed to embrace our natural hair textures or even use the same water fountains as white folk. There is nothing wrong with supporting a small business owned by black people, but it is definitely immoral to write off a company that brings… Read more »

Preach
Preach
5 years ago

Just preach

Taqwa
Taqwa
5 years ago

It’s not about African-Americans it’s about black consumers, whether they are in the US or Mexico or Brazil. None of the tweets even mentioned African-Americans specifically.

Cathy0001
Cathy0001
5 years ago

I don’t see how that particular little girl, with that particular hair type, expands their base. A white girl with curly hair, like those in the Dove “Love Your Curls” campaign would make sense. Those kid’s mothers also worry about dry, tangle prone hair. To me, this is an example of white=generic, supposedly apeals to everybody and black=specific, niche.

The marketing department gets paid big bucks to think these things through.

modestgoddess
modestgoddess
5 years ago

Black people spend more on hair products than any other race in the USA. There is no need to cater to white people to sell their products. I can’t use most of their hair products anyway because they all contain protein. The only line that doesn’t have protein is the African black soap one but it is pretty harsh so I only use the masque every few months to clarify. Most of the popular type 4 youtube naturals do not use these natural hair lines, they make their own moisturizers.

see
see
5 years ago
Reply to  modestgoddess

we only make up 11% of the population how do we spend more than any other race? When I go to the drug store in the hair aisle, 80–90% of the aisle in commercial stores (CVS, Drugmart, bedbath beyond etc..) are white marketed products (pantene, bedhead, etc, and all kinds of gels we don’t use). About 10–15% of the aisle is “ethnic haircare.” That stuff is not marketed to us. And there are way more commercial stores in all neighborhoods throughout the country than privately owned asian wig stores. I have even been to commericial stores that had no black… Read more »

Kandi Preciado
Kandi Preciado
5 years ago
Reply to  see

please research before making a rebuttal, Black women spend the most on hair it doesnt matter what percentage we make up.

BC Roquette
BC Roquette
5 years ago
Reply to  see

There’s so much information and documentation out there that will answer your question. Emphatically YES, Black women spend much more on our hair than others. Read the links below.

https://bmia.wordpress.com/2010/11/05/how-do-black-people-in-america-spend-507-billion-dollars-annually/

http://www.wbez.org/blogs/britt-julious/2013–07/i‑want-put-my-face-108095

http://www.communitysteeple.com/urban-business/137-black-hair-boomin-billion-dollar-industry.html

S Grays
S Grays
5 years ago

It was meant to be funny. It’s not a real ad. You don’t see this on TV or on billboards. Relax!! Shesh!!!

Ama
Ama
5 years ago
Reply to  S Grays

Anything with a company’s logo on it is advertising from pens to tweets.

Jenba Fat
Jenba Fat
5 years ago

I signed up for these emails to read about ideas for my hair. What is up with all the negativity? I can love myself without hating somebody else. *UNSUBSCRIBE*

abbiethrills
abbiethrills
5 years ago
Reply to  Jenba Fat

Deuces!

MalagasyGirl
MalagasyGirl
5 years ago

Honestly, most of AAs constantly complain of racism and discrimination. I do agree that these sad topics still exist, but some of you overreact to things. It’s not just white people who are racist, anyone can. And racism doesn’t only affect black people, it can affect anyone. What’s so embarrassing and disappointing is that y’all complain 24/7 about racism but some of you think you have the right to do it to other people. So what if that poor sweetheart is on a Shea Moisture advertisement, how is it a threat? Seriously, that’s so ignorant to think that this company… Read more »

abbiethrills
abbiethrills
5 years ago
Reply to  MalagasyGirl

Racism = power and privilege. Black people cannot be racist toward white people. No person of colour can in a white-dominated heteropatriarchal society that caters to whiteness. People of colour can exhibit prejudice toward white people, but we cannot oppress them and racism is “oppression based on race.” It’s not racist to want to have spaces that cater to us when we’re largely excluded from the mainstream. All of a sudden natural hair is in and we must include white people or else? When have they ever seen it as a priority to include people of colour without us having to… Read more »

Jesus-in-the-City
Jesus-in-the-City
5 years ago
Reply to  abbiethrills

Black people can be bigoted, prejudiced, mean spirited, jealous, hateful and disrespectful toward white people and that is bad enough. I live in a beautiful, free, imperfect country where we have a black president, where my family and relatives have the educations, jobs and security for their families that they have chosen for themselves. Black people are not the only people in this world or even in this country who have faced some type of struggle. Everyone has their own story, their own struggle, their own demons. You can’t tell what is going on in someone’s heart just by looking… Read more »

wolf_mccloud
5 years ago

*claps*

MalagasyGirl
MalagasyGirl
5 years ago

Thank you so much for this!

Uncurly.comDIYBrazilianKeratin
Reply to  abbiethrills

Racism DOES NOT necessarily equal power and privilege in my book. It’s the use of race as a decision factor in any decision about another person: whether to like them, whether to hire them, whether to discriminate against them in any fashion. And please stop the elitist “educate yourself” put-down when someone doesn’t agree with you. Back at you: educate yourself to the fact that people with differing opinions are not necessarily uneducated. Nor, for that matter, should a person have to be educated to hold an opinion. Or are you an “educationist”? Our business, Uncurly, caters to every race… Read more »

Jesus-in-the-City
Jesus-in-the-City
5 years ago
Reply to  MalagasyGirl

Agree

MalagasyGirl
MalagasyGirl
5 years ago

I know right! So ignorant

naturalree
naturalree
5 years ago

They make money off of us why can’t we make money off of them.

monitano.com
5 years ago

I love your comment Ms. Vee. I just wanted to say that.

ComfortableNaturalista
ComfortableNaturalista
5 years ago

Heres a question though — why can’t companies sell products to nonblack people AND primarily use images of black/brown people? Think about it — black/brown people have always bought products where we are not reflected/mentioned/messaged to at all in the marketing. It seems to me, that the people who are angry about this are not actually being racist towards white people, not really. I think it’s just the bothersome feeling is that other brands expand and achieve growth just fine just by making good products. But often, the route to expansion for black-focused companies seems to only come on the… Read more »

Ama
Ama
5 years ago

Exactly, this is very well written.

TheseTimes
TheseTimes
5 years ago

Here’s a question though — why can’t companies sell products to non-black people AND primarily use images of black/brown people to grow the business? Think about it — black/brown people have always bought products where we are not reflected/mentioned/messaged to in the marketing. Companies and society (ourselves included) seem to understand that black & brown people are able look at the purpose and value of a product and decide if we’ll try it. It seems to me, that the people who are angry about this are not actually being racist towards white people, not really. I think it’s just a bothersome… Read more »

Ama
Ama
5 years ago

Are you serious. This is not racism by any stretch of the imagination. Ferguson is racism. Not getting that MARKETING job because blk ppl cant relate to others is racism. This is discontent . Nobody is barring people from buying shea moisture based on race. Asking for representation of black peoples and poc from a black owned “minority” company (?!) is a necessity right now as stated by another poster(fourth quarter ).

guest
guest
5 years ago

Because they’re on every ad imaginable. go to Europe and you’ll see. Guess what? They’re on Asian Ads too. — just go travelling in Asia, and you’ll see. Even in this Country, Everywhere. Everyone wants to stand up on the back of blacks, then when they think they’ve arrived — they just kick them to the curb as if they never existed. These people are in the spotlight and is the center of attention at every turn. Give the black people a chance. The saddest thing is it’s done by their own.

Cami
Cami
5 years ago

The next time SM uses a child in their advertising, they should hire the beautiful Miss Riley Elle. If you’ve never heard of her, she’s one of the young curlies in the McDonald’s/Cuties t.v. commercial. rileyelle.tumblr.com

Rose
Rose
5 years ago

Carol’s Daughter did it. Why not Shea Moisture? They need to know I’ll go back to my Qhemet Biologics if I have to. Does anyone notice that Shea Moisture products are often not in the “black” hair section. Shea Moisture, probably THE best hair product that is widely sold in retail stores, isn’t even labeled as “for” black hair, although we all know it is. Sometimes I read reviews on Amazon from white people crying about how Shea Moisture doesn’t work on their limp straight hair.… If Shea Moisture wants to be greedy and isolate its original base, then let… Read more »

Brittany
Brittany
5 years ago

Not sure if anyone else has noticed, but I’ve seen Shea Moisture use white models in ads they’ve posted on their facebook page. I don’t necessarily think they’re trying to “crossover” to create a more racially inclusive market, but one thing I do know is that there are already quite a few white people who use Shea Moisture for hair and for body. Not sure what to say about this, though.

Coffeeandfingernails
5 years ago

This is just so ridiculous–complaints about relaxer/white companies marketing to naturals because they don’t really love us in their heart of hearts; complaints about black-owned brands trying to expand their customer base (btw, if you call yourself supporting black business while opposing their attempts to expand market share you’re doing it wrong)–look, you are not in a fiduciary relationship with the people who make your hair products. They make a product which they hope you’ll buy, you give them money in the hopes that the products work well for you. If you’ve been a loyal customer and the products are… Read more »

Jasmine
Jasmine
5 years ago

I’m not understanding why this is a big deal. African American are not the only ones with thick curly hair. So why is it a problem that they are using a white child on there add? Is it because the person is white? Should it be a problem if the child was Mexican? Or even Brazilian?

Adía
Adía
5 years ago
Reply to  Jasmine

The kid in the picture doesn’t have thick curly hair

mlank64
mlank64
5 years ago

Petty.…I work in an area that is 99.9% white and saw shea moisture product sitting on one of the clericals desk and yes …she’s is white. Their products are crossing over…it’b business sonny..not personal

Phoxxie
Phoxxie
5 years ago

Black people are too damn sensitive and I wish yall would shut the hell up already. We are the only race that constantly complains about the littlest things. There are more important things to cry about.

OXxo
OXxo
5 years ago
Reply to  Phoxxie

You know when people have said to my face — “you are damn sensitive” they have then abused me or least tried to.

Advertising by any company is an important thing. Every advert that declines to use a Black or other minority group who actually is the main demographic who buys and uses a company products is repeating the stereotype. This stereotype includes the fact that we are invisible and aren’t worth acknowledging as a group.

nyame
nyame
5 years ago

the fact that were even discussing this is pathetic.

Chel
Chel
5 years ago

Speaking to the author of this article, using the word “infamous” means to be well-known for something bad, having a bad quality. I’m assuming you meant “famous,” unless you really did mean to cite that Shea Moisture’s BOGO sales were a bad thing. Sorry it’s just one of those things I see often that I can’t help point out.

Ms. Vee
Ms. Vee
5 years ago

I have an understanding of both angles: 1) SheaMoisture is black owned. If they (or any black owned company) advertise their products to non-blacks then that means more money into the hands of black pockets. We benefit in that regard. Every other groups will gladly give a black face 5 minutes of shine if it means black consumers will buy their products. So I understand this move on Sheamoisture’s part from a business perspective. 2) On the flip side I understand the deep rooted concern that black women are having with the very idea that once again a space we… Read more »

Guest
Guest
5 years ago
Reply to  Ms. Vee

We can use white images as disposable tokens as they do with us but keep the image of blackness dominant and persistent.”–I think that might be the best solution. You have to cater to your largest consumer base, but there is NOTHING wrong with expanding at the same time.

Jesus-in-the-City
Jesus-in-the-City
5 years ago

People need to stop being so racist. It’s getting embarrassing.

DCW
DCW
5 years ago

Now, while I understand that diversity is key in any for profit entity, it must be said that Shea Moisture needs to always be aware of who they’re marketing to and never ever forget their foundation of grassroots supporters, because that kind of mistake (selective amnesia) will cost you. Never bite the hand that feeds you. Also, I just believe that this little girl should have been accompanied by at least several other little girls and or boys of different ethnic groups, allowing Shea Moisture to effectively get their point across, sans the confusion and backlash. I’m thinking of a… Read more »

KurlyKP
KurlyKP
5 years ago

I think people also forget that SheaMoisture isn’t just the hair products that are known for. They, also, offer bath and body products, e.g. bath salts, body wash, lotions, etc.

Queen2Cent
Queen2Cent
5 years ago

This is probably the first step of Selling the company to Shea Whitey (in living color), and by posting this ad, they wanted to see what kind of reaction they would receive?!?!

Danielle Baylor
Danielle Baylor
5 years ago

I know white and mixed people that use Shea moisture products… I’m not seeing the issue.

102
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x

Shopping Cart