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Indian Weave Companies are Finding Massive Success… In Africa

Avatar • Jan 21, 2015

Black-woman-wearing-weave

A few days ago we posted about a prestigious Caribbean high school banning dreadlocks. Now comes news that Indian weave companies are set to make record profits in Africa. From MadameNoire.com;

Indian beauty firms, specifically human hair sellers, are racking up the big bucks in Africa.  Because Indian hair is popular for its strength and texture, it’s highly sought-after commodity in Africa, where it is used for wigs or extensions. In fact, demand is so high that there is a push by many Indian companies to not only export hair, but to invest in hair care businesses in the continent itself.

Just last week, a company called Godrej Consumer Products India said it will buy South Africa-based hair extension company Friska hair for an undisclosed amount, reports Quartz.

This acquisition reflects our continued commitment to providing African consumers with a wide range of superior quality products at affordable prices,” Godrej’s managing director Vivek Gambhir said in a statement. “We remain very excited by the tremendous potential of the African market.”

Godrej is just the latest Indian company to make such a move. There have been others before, including Marico, Dabur and VLCC that all have hair care businesses in African countries such as South Africa, Morocco, and Nigeria.

No wonder these companies are expanding. The Indian hair export market is estimated to be worth about $393.5 million annually, with a yearly growth rate between 10 percent and 30 percent. Indian hair companies tend to export two types of hair: Remy and non-Remy. Remy hair is usually collected from temples and is of the highest grade. Non-Remy hair is processed. Because Non-Remy hair has cuticles that do not face the same direction, it is treated with hydrochloric acid to remove the cuticles. This reduces the quality of hair.

To get natural, chemically undamaged hair Indian companies go to great lengths, such as holding online auctions. The Tirupathi Temple in Andhra Pradesh (one of the 29 states of India), which holds online auctions annually, has earned $97 million through the sale of hair via e‑auctions since 2011.

Africa is a prime market for Indian hair. Its dry hair market (the market for weaves, wigs, and extensions) is currently estimated to be worth $6 billion a year and booming. The market is so big that global giants such as Unilever and L’Oreal are investing heavily in African hair care products.

What are your thoughts ladies?

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AdinaKay
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AdinaKay

Their profits are waning in America where the natural hair movement is expanding, so they move to a continent that doesn’t have access to the same resources we do.
Go where the money is. Standard business tactic. Sad, but can you blame them? These people don’t care about how they are altering the perception of beauty in order to make a profit. They got bills to pay and that’s all that matters.

Brown Girl
Guest
Brown Girl

yeah they dont have access to all of our fancy hair care products to help manage their hair..at least i dont think they do. so weave may be easier for them..wow how dissapointing still… 🙁

Tracienatural
Guest
Tracienatural

Wow. I can’t help but wonder: what could the African diaspora do with $6 billion dollars every year? We could create farms, build schools and housing, create businesses, communities–we could have repatriation programs and purchase homesteads for those in the diaspora who want to return to the continent. The possibilities would be endless. Hopefully, one day, our people will realize how much wealth we really have if we practice collective group economics.

naturallytee
Guest
naturallytee

I am not shocked

Dee
Guest
Dee

Right!

T.
Guest
T.

The school in the previous post didn’t ban dreadlocks. And using that as the opening for this post seems to be stretching to make a tenuous connection (between policy at one school in the Caribbean and the the profitability of Indian hair weave companies in Africa) seem stronger than it is. It’s like: last week we had a natural hair story from somewhere outside the United States, and now we have a different story from a completely different part of the world, but also somewhere outside the United States, so we’re going to link them together. I’m giving that approach… Read more »

cheryl
Guest
cheryl

It’s sad that African women are ashamed of their natural hair and hide behind weaves and wigs! Hell, if you can’t be natural and nappy in the motherland, where can you be?!!

tolu
Guest
tolu

Be careful the way you generalise. Lots of African women also wear their natural hair.

marie
Guest
marie

its not that they’re ashamed per se. Most women have perms, average hair length is slighlty below the ears in ghana, or forms a thin short ponytail. weaves are a quick solution. and everyone does it so its like the norm. When girls wanna dress up , they get weaves. its seen as normal

Ivie
Guest
Ivie

If I tell you how much my cousins in Nigeria spend on weaves you will wonder whether us in the states are the ones that are needy. $400 every 2 weeks cause it’s too hot to keep the hair in for longer than that at least that’s what my cousins tell me smh

eljjai
Guest
eljjai

This irks me to no end. As one who lives in Africa, it is everywhere. Everywhere you go, women are wearing weaves meanwhile their real hair is dead and gone underneath that. Traction alopecia is a major issue and women don’t seem to care or think it is normal. People have hairlines that start behind their ears. African women don’t take the time to care for their own hair. They just let it rot under the weaves. When they take the weave off there’s all sorts of damage. We need to do better.

milly
Guest
milly

I’m with you. I live in South Africa and people wear weaves as if there are no other options. I will say I think this increase in sales is not reflective of the shift that I am seeing to natural hair, though it is not on as large a scale as in the US there are those that I know of that are transitioning or have done the big chop. I think the increase in sales is more indicative of the fact that people want better quality hair and no longer want to use the human hair blends largely on… Read more »

Deedeemaha
Guest
Deedeemaha

Haha. That’s sad. Rot underneath the weave. African Rot, I don’t want to think about it.

Jojo
Guest
Jojo

God forbid African women want to flip their hair too! African women are like every else in the world who have bought into the eurocentric sense of beauty. They want to flip their hair too just like their AA sisters. So please stop trying to hold us to a higher standard, and lets not act self-righteous just because you’ve recently seen the light! The Indians have also seen the light and are being smart in taking their commodoties directly to Africa instead of selling their goods to China and having the African traders going to China to purchase. The strategy… Read more »

Alicia
Guest
Alicia

Makes me want to go into the hair business. XD Good lord “$393.5 million annually, with a yearly growth rate between 10 percent and 30 percent.” When are we going to admit there is a problem people. XD That amount money could be used for something else instead it’s on hair…

SemiXoXo
Guest
SemiXoXo

I’m all for doing whatever you want with your hair but this obsession with weave is crazy. It’s to the point where one wouldn’t even want to go outside if their hair isn’t ‘done’. If ppl would add up the amount of money spent on weaves I bet it’d be high. And honestly, weave is the last thing some of these women should be spending money on. Their rent isn’t paid, light bill overdue, water is soon to be turned off and yet their hair is ‘done’. And half of these weaves look a mess anyway. Investing money to look… Read more »

Deeds
Guest
Deeds

C’mon Motherland…we have got to do better.

Edges_N_Paris
Guest

Well the first rule of business economics is supply and demand so this comes as no surprise. I am certainly in no position to judge since I wore weaves for 10 years before I went natural, however, I took very good care of my hair beneath my weaves. If these women want to wear weaves more power to them, but let’s work together on getting them quality hair care products for their natural hair. China is going to always send bull sh$t product because that’s how they roll and India will likely do the same. At the end of the… Read more »

kia
Guest
kia

No different than what’s going on here in America

Temi
Guest
Temi

Lol yeah the hair industry is HUGE in Nigeria. But I really don’t see how this is an issue… As long as the hair underneath the weaves/wigs is healthy, then I see no problem with it. Me personally, I find it way too hot to wear fake hair. So I love having my natural hair out. I know a lot of my friends wouldn’t be caught dead without their weaves (natural and relaxed), but tbh I really don’t care. Its their choice. We have a saying here in Nigeria, “don’t take panadol for someone elses headache”- in other words, focus… Read more »

Freetea
Guest
Freetea

I agreed with what you were saying until the last two paragraphs. What? Why is discussing the growing weave market in Africa a sign of American entitlement? And how does that imply that Black Americans are trying to be “more African”?

BelleNaturelleParis
Guest

Your mother land comment is not cool sis. We are ALL the descendants of Africans, however for Black Americans the U.S is our geopolitical place. Why can’t Black Americans comment on trends in Africa like we would trends in the U.S?

Temi
Guest
Temi

Yes but unless i’m mistaken, didn’t the human race begin in Africa? So does that mean the whole world can refer to Africa as the Mother Land? White Americans are descendants of the British but they don’t call England the Mother Land. And yes I know that their move to another place was voluntary as opposed to black americans, but my point still stands. I’ve never even heard a black british person refer to Africa as the Mother Land, or someone from the Caribbean. Just black americans and I don’t really understand why… it irritates me cause they really have… Read more »

lis
Guest
lis

Temi.…shut up.…..nobody is trying to claim anything…and if Blacks here wanted to claim Africa and talk about africa, what’s going on there, move there what are you going to do about it?.…that being said I kind of get the point.…but these are only comments about a story on an American site.….so

BelleNaturelleParis
Guest

Yes civilization began in Africa, therefore technically all ethnicities can refer to Africa as the motherland, but more so Black Americans because we are direct descendants of Africans. Would you like to know what irritates me? When African women attempt to separate themselves from Black American women and vice versa; and while I won’t attempt to speak for all Black Americans, it is disingenuous to assume that Blacks do not know about African cultures. Rather than ridiculing us for wanting to be closer to Africa and African culture, why don’t you use this platform to teach the ones who are… Read more »

Temi
Guest
Temi

“Would you like to know what irritates me? When African women attempt to separate themselves from Black American women and vice versa” There is not attempt, we ARE separate. Thats what irritates me! How black american women just cant seem to understand that. Just to give you a SMALL idea of what I mean. An article was posted on this website recently about a white girl who had her hair in braids and manjority of the comments were screaming “culture appropriation”. That same article was a posted on a popular Nigerian blog earlier this week and the comments were almost… Read more »

BelleNaturelleParis
Guest

While I agree that Black American women and African women have very different cultures, we are all Black women. In fact, in the link that you posted, many of the women referred to themselves as Black so I am confused by your argument. We can all identify with being Black women in a male dominated society, the “appropriateness” regarding the size of our bodies, the color of our skin, our hair, and perhaps even economic and social marginalization (in western countries). It was disappointing to read how many of the commenters in the article you posted referring to Black American… Read more »

lis
Guest
lis

Temi.…lol…again shut up.

Cosita
Guest
Cosita

Are you for real? You are as ignorant about the US and you accuse us of being about Africa. you assume none of us have been to Africa. All white Americans did not come from Great Britain lol A huge part of the US is a territory purchased from France and there are still lots of people in Lousiana who have French last names and who speak French. Florida and the western US were originally colonized by Spain. Black Americans have been wearing braids since we stepped off the slave boat. Germany is called ” Fatherland.” Just like any country… Read more »

Lol
Guest
Lol

I have to disagree with the more so bit. It gets tiresome to talk about how vast Africa is and the many cultures that exist within it but it can’t be stressed enough. There is a difference between feeling a connection to something and researching about it, to actually living it and having current attachments to said thing. I will give a couple of examples as to why I began my comment this way. Is there any place in Africa where those who claim Africa as the motherland: Know how to interact with a chief? Do you know what you… Read more »

OXxo
Guest
OXxo

Firstly not all White Americans are descendants of the British. A bit of historical reading would quickly clear up that misinformation for you.

Secondly I do agree with you that this view of Africans — a continent with a bigger land mass than North America let along the USA — is patronising.

There have been plenty of people from the continent of Africa who have worn extensions, wigs and weaves for decades. The market increases as people get richer and more urbanised.

Guest
Guest
Guest

Whites will often use the phrase “The Fatherland” to describe Europe or a specific country within Europe when musing on ancestry … It’s really a unity thing.. meaning a shared understanding of their racial identity and something people of obviously recent African descent may sadly never achieve. Even as white Americans proudly scream from the rooftops their American identity, which they so often do, they do take great pride in their European roots. You can see, hear, and read the unity and pride felt by these people in any conversation concerning contributions to (Western) civilization.

Cosita
Guest
Cosita

Yeah They’re is a reason every major US city has a St. Patrick’s Day parade. They are celebrating their Irish heritage. White people here celebrate European heritage. Where I live there is a French social club and a Slavic, Greek and a bunch of other such groups and events for people whose ancestors got off the boat like 100 years ago. Temi just plain doesnt know wth she’s talking about.

Guest
Guest
Guest

All of you black women on here,let me tell you about YOUR real history.She is right,we do not come from AFRICA,we come from ISRAEL. Yes the JEWS in ISRAEL are fake,so in reality,she is right.Secondly Temi,African people do everything we do over here in AMERICA. Thirdly,we might be AMERICANS,but we created the AMERICAN culture. White people did not have culture until they bought us over here.They too stole from what we created because we were no longer able to speak our native tongue.So we had to start from scratch.Oh btw,do not try to tell me that Black Americans do not… Read more »

lis
Guest
lis

@guest…lol… you need to shut up too.

Dj
Guest
Dj

My hand is giving you a swift slap for this comment…

kia
Guest
kia

So much shade in that last paragraph ????

JenniD
Guest
JenniD

Wow at this comment. Lol at “why do you care about what we do over here” statement is ironic because the whole reason why your fellow Africans are wearing weaves in droves is because they are into what WE DO OVER HERE in the US. Your on this blog because of what we do over here in the US. As an African American I could easily make a similar statement lamented that Africans are trying to copy us when it comes to fake hair. See how silly that is? Like it or not we are connected. You would prefer us… Read more »

BelleNaturelleParis
Guest

So obnoxious but so true 🙂

Lol
Guest
Lol

This is a blog about afro/curly hair, this type of hair exists all over the world so it is relevant to anyone who has it. Africans are wearing weaves because they have been force-fed images of Europeans and still are to this day. Trust me, the bombardment of images seen in the media (second to selected country’s population) is mainly of white, not “African Americans”. Also, how can you lay claim to fake hair, it belongs to neither of us?? Indian hair should have no more to do with Americans than it does to Africans. If either group uses it,… Read more »

Mal
Guest
Mal

Say racists/white supremacists groups have their way and wanna kill and send every ethnicity back to “where they came from”. They are not gonna be like “oh black americans, you can stay here,cause Africa is not your motherland” BS.

They gonna send it alllll back to Africa cause whether you like it or not, Black people outside Africa are of AFRICAN DECENT.

Lol
Guest
Lol

That may be true but it does not mean it would be beneficial for any of us. You may be of African descent but that is not the only ethnicity present in your lineage. Black Americans and Africans are very different, if that situation was too occur, it would be catastrophic.
Think of when people are rehoused in new areas and therefore immersed in new communities, it is difficult, and somewhere down the road, one group’s culture and habits die out.

Mal
Guest
Mal

Im not African- American though. In the end we are all Black people are very divided and it saddens me cause it like we are always at each others throat and its not gonna change. We are sadly doomed to destroy ourselves despite some individuals bests efforts.

Lol
Guest
Lol

Sorry for making the assumption. Why is celebrating our differences being equated with being at one another’s throats? I don’t believe it should be looked at in this way.

Also, it is not only black people who are divided, we all are through many factors. I do not feel any angst towards black people in other areas but I recognise our location and background will influence our characters.

lis
Guest
lis

I wonder why some Africans are soo threatened by Black Americans.…If B lack Americans even think about Africa (or moving there,etc) their craziness comes out…why?.…When I’ve seen whites and Asians, Arabs, Indians living there, etc, with not a peep from Africans.…why is this?…legitimate question for any African…and is it true whites and Asians, etc treat??? Is this the right word? Africans better and they get along with them better?

Temi
Guest
Temi

Threatned??? Lol you cant honestly believe that? In Africa (and in Europe and in Asia and basically in the whole wide world) we grew up listening to american music and watching american movies. American culture was projected on us since america is the biggest entertainment industry in the world. And theres nothing wrong with that. Thats why you can go to any country on the world, and hear beyonce on the radio or see people walking around in “westernised” clothing. HOWEVER, please do not assume that this means anyone actually wants to be you. You should hear how most people… Read more »

lis
Guest
lis

Black Americans are loud, etc, etc lmao.…That all is rich coming from Africans and all of the crap we see and hear about you all.…now im sure of course all of that crap isnt 100% true..of course not.I have been to Africa.I won’t say where, lol, just Africa. I also have half Yoruba cousins so save me your patronizing lectures…who do some of you think you are. I know for a fact you all wouldn’t dare to whites, Arabs, Asians, etc.…so.…… I can give a damn about what you or any African think about Black Americans and I give less… Read more »

Likewaterforchoc
Guest
Likewaterforchoc

The last few frames of your statement and so backwards and silly that I don’t know where to begin. “A bunch of black Americans” are the reason that you wear “Beyoncé-inspired” weaves in the first place. Also, I would not discourage anyone from caring about what goes on in Africa (see the whole “Bring Back Our Girls” campaign) because of what we have seen, the world, in general, does not care about Africa. And sweetheart that is NOT a good thing. However, I do applaud you for your honesty and telling black American women how a lot of you really… Read more »

Lol
Guest
Lol

No actually a bunch of white/Asian people is why we wear weaves and judging by the tone of this article and some of the comments, it isn’t anything to be proud of…

African Empress
Guest
African Empress

We are African people, whether you accept it or not. You don’t have to be in Africa to be African. If a cow is born in a pig pen, he is still a cow. He will always say ‘Moo’ even though he is amongst pigs.
American is a nationality. African is a race. Can change you nationality, Can’t change you race,” (mutabaruka)

Temi
Guest
Temi

“African is a race”.……I am just so done. I mean WOOOOOW really??? Africans are the only people who can call themselves Africans. So in other words anyone who comes from the COUNTRIES within Africa e.g. Angola, Nigeria, Egypt (and even they don’t really call themselves African), SA, Mozambique, Senegal, Eritrea etc… Europeans are the only people who can call themselves Europeans. So people who come from the UK, France, Italy, Poland etc… North Americans are the only people who can call themselves North Americans. Canada, USA etc… These places are called CONTINENTS. People who live on these CONTINENTS are made… Read more »

BelleNaturelleParis
Guest

So President Obama is of mixed ethnic background, yet often considered Black American. His father was Kenyan, thus can he claim African ethnicity or not?

saaaasaaaa
Guest
saaaasaaaa

Obama can claim African. African*-Americans really shouldn’t though IMO.

(*I really hate the term African-American for Black Americans who aren’t African).

Erinma Chiagozie
Guest
Erinma Chiagozie

LOL at ‘Pandol for someone else’s headache’. Such a Naija phrase!

HairAnomaly
Guest
HairAnomaly

My honest, initial reaction…embarrassment.

Just imagine the imagine the economic and cultural impact we would in our communities–in the world–if we would simply embrace our natural hair. It would be wonderful to see, indeed.

Rebecca
Guest
Rebecca

First of all, be very careful about saying “Africans don’t have time for their hair” or something along those lines, Africa is huge made up of over 50 countries. I’ve lived in Egypt, Tanzania and Ethiopia and all of them have radically different hair practices. Don’t group us into one big country for convenience. Secondly, I don’t understand the criticism that people are inflicting on the people that do want to wear weaves. If the natural women in the US and Canada and UK can enjoy the freedom and versatility being natural offers, can the ladies in Africa not enjoy… Read more »

JenniD
Guest
JenniD

Its not a critic more like “oh no there goes the neighborhood” type of reaction. African women are just like any other women. They enjoy hair versatility too. I say more power to them but if it ends up like the mess we got over here( and from some of the comments it may already be so) then lord help you. Unfortunately we live in a world where your image is my image. If the majority of black people are wearing wigs and weaves on the regular what does that image portray? If we are shelling out some SERIOUS cash… Read more »

shalita
Guest
shalita

This appears as subtle self rejection to me. We seem to be the only race of people that deny who we are outwardly from skin color to hair. What race do you know that lets their own hair brake off and then goes and buys another races hair aside of pieces and vehemently defends this choice??? sad reality.

Amie
Guest
Amie

Very true. But also consider the history and politics of beauty and power. Africa was “Europe’s backyard” and heavily colonized by several European countries. The context of domination impacting the standard of beauty is important to consider. Even in Latin America, whiter people were and still are prioritized, in better living conditions, often have more economic power, and are seen as more beautiful. This is from heavy European colonization as well. They received the same messages of the darker you are, especially the blacker and the kinkier your hair, the less attractive. Money, position, power = influencing standards of beauty.… Read more »

Anon46
Guest
Anon46

I don’t see any difference between the demand for fake hair on a continent a world away & fake hair demand here. People everywhere spend their $ on whatever they want, not always what they need. Black ppl in the US are no better. Whether it’s hair, cars, clothes, shoes, makeup, etc., a lot of $ gets spent on unnecessary, material items. The pot can’t call the kettle black. Also, alot of natural women like the so called virgin hair that’s processed to look like afro kinky hair. Where do you think that hair comes from? Everything comes from China.… Read more »

Kali
Guest
Kali

Its embarrassing and saddening that all over the world, we as Black people, majority of us will spend and arm and a leg for a beauty aesthetic of another race so feel beautiful.

Hope Tweenie Kay
Guest
Hope Tweenie Kay

lol i was born and raised in Africa all my 21 years. i have access to all the info online and most products i c listed on natural hair blogs. it’s just an excuse. people dont want to deal with anything kinky and “wild”

Brown Girl
Guest
Brown Girl

agreed..sorry i just assumed they didn’t i was thinking about miss jessie’s and all the other expensive conditioners and moisturizers, hope i didnt offend anyone i didt know

nimotaful
Guest
nimotaful

umm where do you think unrefined shea butter and all of these other oils most naturalistas are using came from?? the motherland. these products aren’t ‘fancy,’ they are natural, organic, and mostly originating from africa.

Brown Girl
Guest
Brown Girl

i know where those products come from most of the ingredients come from there. i just was talking about like miss jessie’s and other expensive moisturizers and conditioners. I should of made myself more clear. I just wasnt sure if that stuff was that accessible to them( maybe more expensive not sure) I’m not too familar with that aspect of the african diaspora so my apologies if i offended anyone..

imsotiredofthis
Guest
imsotiredofthis

the ignorance about the diverse peoples that make up ‘Africa’ is astounding. The ‘African market’ is different in whichever country you go to. Even within one African country, attitudes towards hair and hair care vary wildly. Even within one tribe within one country, attitudes towards hair and hair care vary based on dialect, geographical location, and socioeconomic status. Also here is another nuance: all the comments about ‘we as black people’ are very Western?? No one goes around Accra or Kinshasa or Lagos bemoaning the fate of ‘we as black people’ because everyone in the country is black?? “Black people”… Read more »

SheridaDaily
Guest

*slow clap*
Took the words right out of my mouth.

JenniD
Guest
JenniD

You just made a sweeping generalization by saying Americans please stop. We too are also not all the same. Many of us black Americans do not live in a bubble. We are very aware of the diversity in Africa. Many of us have Traveled the world over including diffrent parts of Africa. our saying “we as black people“isnt out of ignorance but is generally a nod towards unity. As black Americans we simply see black people no matter where they are from. To us black is black. Nationality makes no diffrence. There is a history and a reason behind that.… Read more »

BelleNaturelleParis
Guest

Preach!

Cosita
Guest
Cosita

When I say black people I mean black people. It has nothing to do with where they live. I have been to Africa. I know there are cultural differences but to many non blacks we all look alike and they don’t give a crap about cultures and traditions. The weave vendors see black and they see green. They didn’t run to Poland, Russia and Iceland to freaking sell their Indian hair for a reason. They went looking for where there are more kinky haired people for bigger profits. They don’t know a Yoruba from a Fulani and they don’t give… Read more »

Amie
Guest
Amie

Eh, both agree and disagree with this. When I lived in Europe, people constantly told me I wasn’t the same as Africans or that I wasn’t actually black. Theres definitely a clear difference in how black Americans are perceived vs black Africans, depending on where you go, in my experiences. Even here in the states. But it is true that black hair is recognized as the hair that needs to be fixed (or that we think it needs to be fixed, and will buy shit) and they could see a market for that. Like any business opportunity, you go where… Read more »

Cosita
Guest
Cosita

People have told me I’m not a real black because I speak proper English. They don’t define me. This OP accuses us of generalizing then generlizes us as what we ALL as US blacks mean when we say black people. It’s a race. Not a nationality.

Amie
Guest
Amie

I think article isn’t really talking about diverse peoples that make up Africa though. Its about businesses investing in profit. So…while the differences in concentrated markets do matter, and it would be interesting to see which countries are most important to this hair weave industry, I think this article is just giving the general idea of how successful this industry is in Africa. However, it does only take a slight click of the mouse on the links in the article to start to get a picture of which countries are of notable mention here. For example: http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/08/06/uk-africa-hair-idUKKBN0G60A620140806 Now, there may… Read more »

Amie
Guest
Amie

I agree about the whole “we as black people” thing though. There’s a pan-african diaspora, pro-black kind of sentiment among some black Americans, which is mind boggling to me. It usually seems as though the people don’t have a clear idea of the cultural diversity and political tensions within and between many African nations. The idea that they could truly feel a kinship or oneness with people across the Atlantic ocean, who most likely don’t share any common culture, native languages, foods, political ideals, etc., when they don’t even share a cohesive identity amongst themselves or within their countries, is… Read more »

Temi
Guest
Temi

I love your comment. Just to add to that, quotes from an article I found: 1. “A shared complexion does not equal a shared culture, nor does it automatically lead to friendships,” says Kofi Glover, a native of Ghana and a political science professor at the University of South Florida. “Whether we like it or not, Africans and African-Americans have two different and very distinct cultures.” 2. “That’s a fallacy,” retorts Omali Yeshitela, president of St. Petersburg’s National People’s Democratic Uhuru Movement, a black nationalist group whose name means “freedom” in Swahili. Yeshitela is from St. Petersburg and was formerly… Read more »

Cheri Ann
Guest
Cheri Ann

Umm, Fela Kuti used his music to spread a message about a “One Africa”. I’ve borne witness to debates/whispers of the continent considering a common monetary system like the Euro. I say this to say that this “we as Black people” ideology is not just an African American thing. I think we can all understand the diversity and fluidity of Blackness/African culture while also appreciating and acknowledging our sense of oneness. Those are not mutually exclusive concepts. Don’t assume African Americans are all ignorant on African culture and politics. We’re not. Your entire comment was full of offensive generalizations about… Read more »

eljjai
Guest
eljjai

I’m African, and I can attest to the general attitude towards hair in Southern Africa, at least, Zimbabwe, Botswana, South Africa, and to a lesser extent Zambia. The majority of African women I meet on a daily basis are wearing fake hair, either real or synthetic. A few have locs, and even fewer have full time natural hair. Women are walking around with extreme traction alopecia like its natural and ok. And these are women who have the money to do better. With urbanisation, culture/tribes are taking a back seat. So that the experiences of Xhosa, Tswana, Bemba women tend… Read more »

Amie
Guest
Amie

Not really surprised. Black women all over the world hate their hair, unfortunately.

Kyria
Guest
Kyria

That chile name Temi,you guys should not be offended,they have always had their qualms with us because they are so jealous of us.They are mad because they are not MIXED or lighter skinned like us in AMERICA,it is sick. Black Africans are just like white people but with Black skin. But they are some that are nothing like that.Black Americans need to unite in America.Let them wear weaves,hell,white women wear them too. All women do. However Black women in America we can rock our weaves too however the only difference is that we take care of our hair and they… Read more »

Cosita
Guest
Cosita

I think that Temi person comments were messed up and offensive and so are yours. I’m black and if someone is black to me they are black regardless of where they are from. I don’t agree with any this nonsense

whatthe****
Guest
whatthe****

You are so ignorant its sad. I am an African, Zimbabwean by birth and i rock my natural texture, no wigs, no weaves and i am definitely not like nor do i aspire to be a white person. Educate yourself, sis…

saaaasaaaa
Guest
saaaasaaaa

I’m not trying to be offensive, but since I am a black African, and I know/am related to many black Africans I can tell you that they aren’t jealous of you, they’re EMBARRASSED by you and don’t want to be associated with you. That’s all. And by “you” I don’t mean ALL African-Americans, just the stereotypical ones that get depicted most often in the media.

Also, there are light skinned people in Africa. *eye roll*

lis
Guest
lis

I agree with most of this statement but.… What does that have to do with anything. All of those *cultural things* you just mentioned has nothing to do with Black Americans.….we have our own traditions.….I for one do not give a damn about any of it and don’t give a damn about who’s a Yoruba, Fulani, or Wolof…I see people.… which i think is a great advantage/strength.…. I see this only applies to certain people…do you all tell whites, Arabs, Chinese any of this crap..even the ones born there..right…they do not give a crap either and you Africans deal with… Read more »

Lol
Guest
Lol

You just hit the nail on the head and this is what I am trying to convey. I was addressing those who are saying Africans and black Americans are the same. We each have differences and ways of going about things that we should be proud of — when positive! Why try and put them under one umbrella? I like seeing differences in people, I think variety in appearances and ways of life is a thing of beauty. Its nothing to hide. To be honest there is no need to tell whites, Arabs or Chinese any of this because they… Read more »

Lol
Guest
Lol

Its nothing to do with feeling threatened or not wanting Americans to move there — where other people live has nothing to do with my life. I am merely addressing the fact that there are differences between Africans and black Americans. No disrespect at all to black Americans, I for one think the culture is extremely rich and respect it as important.

In my own country, it is noted when there are whites, Asians and Arabs coming in. Some people like it and some do not, but it is definitely noticed and talked about.

Cosita
Guest
Cosita

Where did anyone say black Americans and black Africans were the same culturally? In fact several people commented that all black Americans are NOT all culturally the same. Do you think blacks in New Orleans have the same culture as those in New York City? I doubt they are eating jambalaya, beignets and crawfish while dancing in Native American costumes in tne streets of Times Square. A friend of mine who is black and British advised me not to come to this site because of the hatefulness. I wish I had listened. Like I said to me black is a… Read more »

Edidiong Bassey
Guest
Edidiong Bassey

I really enjoy this fight between Africans and African-Americans. I dont blame you, I blame the whites who segregated the same race by giving you different names: “Africans” and “African Americans”. The term “Africans” was used to define the race which were not carted away as slaves during the slave-trade Era, while the term“Black Americans” define a race which was subject to slavery in America. We are all Africans irrespective of conditions and locations. There is this common saying “that i am the child of my mother”. This means that no matter who adopts a child, the child would always… Read more »

Amie
Guest
Amie

This concept of race isn’t a genetic reality, so lets also keep that in mind, while we are vehemently defending “who we are.” It doesn’t matter whether they define you or not. I was responding to your assertion that they don’t see a difference between black people of different nationalities or physical characteristics.

Amie
Guest
Amie

Just food for thought…You do realize that you’re applying a very Euro-American/Western concept of race onto everyone? You can believe what you want to, obviously. But the label of “black” stems from a concept of self that was created for you by the white systems dominating our part of the world. You should probably think twice before lording your Euro-American cultural perceptions of race and identity onto other people from the rest of the world. (Although, to be fair, many cultures call people some type of “black”.) I know how tempting that is, trust me. I’m constantly telling people, “Well,… Read more »

Cosita
Guest
Cosita

LOL. Since you took the time to write me a long note I will respond although I am leaving tpthis site. First of all what I called “nonsense” was an assertion made all Africans are jealous of us Americans for being mixed race. I feel supporting that post is you applying a racial supremicist pov. Secondly I have never said a word about mixed race or anyone else should identify as black. I really don’t care what people call themselves. You seem to be totally missing my point. The discussion which is about people who choose to self identify as… Read more »

Amie
Guest
Amie

I mean, people have the right to do whatever they want. If changing their name to something they feel fits more to their “spirit,” then it’s not something I’ll laugh at. However, it is definitely true that many African Americans, usually the less educated people of any race really, have had a negative connotation associated with Africans. Ive had some friends who have received comments associating them with “an African look” as an insult from other black people. In a society that has long thrived on the praise of whiteness and the degradation of blackness, its an obvious consequence that… Read more »

Erinma Chiagozie
Guest
Erinma Chiagozie

Nobody is threatened my Black Americans. It’s just that a lot of times, for Africans like myself, Black Americans come across as trying to inform us of ourselves like we are clueless and need to be taught. It comes across like ‘we are the definition of the brown skin experience’, and Africa has to conform to whatever ideology or experience may hold sway for Black Americans. I guess that ticks people off and creates this inability to communicate.

Erinma Chiagozie
Guest
Erinma Chiagozie

you can get those kind of moisturisers in Nigeria. I don’t know about anywhere else

Edges_N_Paris
Guest

This comment section has turned into a mud slinging contest and it’s very disturbing. The African woman keep reiterating a perceived patriarchal attitude stemming from the Black American women, and the Black American women are constantly defending themselves. NO ONE on this thread has referred to African and Black American women as one in the same. Of course we have different cultures; we come from different countries. The Black American women have referred to the African women as our sisters, yet the African women have retorted that they don’t want our kinship. Okay fine, no problem. Black American women are… Read more »

lis
Guest
lis

Lol. I guess the same can be said about how some Black Americans feel about Africans.…and the jokes on.…

lis
Guest
lis

You are an imbecile. Lol. Again shut up temi

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