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Beauty Conglomerate L’Oreal, a Company With a Troubled History With Black Women, Buys Out Carol’s Daughter

Avatar • Oct 21, 2014

lisaprice

 [photo source]

 

More Carol’s Daughter news broke early in the day on Monday, October 20th. Beauty conglomerate L’Oreal acquired the Carol’s Daughter brand. Lisa Price, Carol’s Daughter Founder and President made the following video announcement via the Carol’s Daughter Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=10152915056882224

Price shares,

I want to thank all of you for the support and the love and for being beside me, and I want you to hold my hand as we walk into this next chapter of the Carol’s Daughter life… It brings me so much pride and joy to be able to join a family like L’Oreal because I know I’ll be with the right shepherd … the company that will help to take what I’ve built and solidify it in its place in history and beauty, and I don’t have to wonder if, 20 years from now, 30 years from now, will there still be a Carol’s Daughter brand. … ”

Price further expands,

 

I have worked hard for the past 21 years nurturing my brand and am thrilled that we will have a new home with L’Oréal USA. L’Oréal has a proven track record of helping established companies achieve their full potential while staying true to the core of the brand and they have an understanding of the future of multi-cultural beauty.  I could not be more proud to begin this next chapter of the Carol’s Daughter brand with them. I know that my mother (Carol) is smiling as well.”

In a separate statement, L’Oreal USA’s President Frederick Roze sheds some light on what drove the aquisition:

Carol’s Daughter possesses an expertise in the multicultural consumer segment, a rapidly expanding market that represents an important growth opportunity in the beauty industry. This acquisition will enable L’Oreal USA to build a new dedicated multicultural beauty division as part of our Consumer Products business, and strengthen the company’s position in this dynamic market.”

The L’Oreal website and official press release identifies the Carol’s Daughter brand as an “American multi-cultural beauty brand with a pioneering heritage in the natural beauty movement”. Furthermore, the beauty conglomerate articulates that Carol’s Daughter caters to a “diverse, rapidly growing market and has established a loyal consumer following across the country” while throwing in the facts and figures — Carol’s Daughter brought in $27 million in sales during the last 12 months.

Carol’s Daughter will join 28 other brands under the L’Oreal umbrella, including NYX, Essie, Clarisonic, Garnier, Lancome, Maybelline New York, Softsheen-Carson, Redken, Urban Decay, Georgio Armani Beauty, and others. The closing of the deal is still subject to regulatory approvals, but it’s pretty much a done deal.

Now that we’ve gotten the facts out of the way, let’s have a little candid conversation. Fair warning about the words ahead: they’re 100% honest. I may come across a little harsh to some of you, and for that I apologize in advance. Ultimately, my intent is not to drag Lisa Price or Carol’s Daughter. I just want us to engage ourselves a little more critically in matters pertaining to natural hair. Feel free to disagree with me at any point, as I’m hoping this article will inspire thoughtful (respectful) debate.

 

Let’s carry on.

 

The last time we had a chat about Carol’s Daughter, it was back in April about the Chapter 11 Bankruptcy filing of the Carol’s Daughter Stores leg of the brand. It was in that article I shared that Lisa Price no longer owned the brand she created, rather that it was owned by Pegasus Capital Advisors, LP. It’s no secret that the brand sought to “broaden” the scope of who the brand caters to, by introducing a more “polyethnic” marketing campaign — much to the chagrin of long-time Carol’s Daughters supporters. The sale of Carol’s Daughter aligned with this multi-ethnic approach, and what many former supporters have identified as a decline in the quality and ingredients of the products.

Everything in me wants to be happy for Lisa Price — I wish her nothing but success and continued blessings as a pioneer in the natural hair industry. I’m not a hater, nor do I wish ill upon her. Carol’s Daughter is (?) her legacy, and let’s keep it real — when her brand launched in 1993, I was only 8 years old. She’s undoubtedly a natural hair heavyweight who helped pave the way for brands like Camille Rose Naturals, Alikay Naturals, Oyin Handmade, Koils By Nature, TGIN, Soultanicals, Eden BodyWorks and countless others. In that regard, she has my respect. But when I take a step back and look at the latest business moves of Carol’s Daughter with a more critical lens, I see something very problematic.

Off the bat without even thinking too hard, I see dollar signs. Roze’s statement reads like a flashback to Duck Tales, with Scrooge McDuck diving into a vault of golden coins and dollar bills. To put it plainly, L’Oreal wants our money…now. I would have respected Roze a little (a very, very little bit) more had he just come out and said, “We see how lucrative this natural hair thing is, and well, we want in.”

To be clear, there’s nothing wrong with wanting to benefit financially from a market segment on an upward trajectory. Heck, I’d be lying if I said I never entertained the thought of founding my own line of products. Small business owners don’t just create brands with plans of taking hopes, dreams, and hugs to the bank — they’re in it to make money too. And there is nothing wrong with wanting to financially benefit and leave a footprint in a community that you are an active participant in. But this acquisition in my opinion, is just disingenuous.

beyonce controversy1

[photo source]

After all, L’Oreal has been shading Black women for years. In 2008, L’Oreal came under fire internationally for being accused of (and denying) lightening Beyonce’s skin in print advertisements. The very next year, Garnier (one of the 28 brands under the L’Oreal banner) was forced by French courts to pay out over 60,000 Euros in fines and damages for intentionally creating an all-White sales team to promote the brand throughout Europe. [source]. In 2012, L’Oreal was under the microscope again, for broadcasting what many believed to be a commercial in which Beyonce distances herself from Blackness by identifying as African-American, Native American, and French. [source]

And this latest acquisition is nothing more than a facade for the shading that will continue under the banner of “multiculturalism”. I have absolutely no qualm with celebrating natural hair and beauty with women across the African Diaspora, and women who claim more than one ethnicity (I don’t talk in terms of race, as it is a social construct — but that’s another article for another time). There is beauty in our diversity, and no haphazard marketing campaign can take that away. But the deliberate “lightwashing” of the natural hair community does us a collective disservice. Calling Carol’s Daughter an “American multi-cultural beauty brand” is reminiscent of Raven-Symone foolery nothing short of a slap in the face. After all, American standards of beauty are what ultimately forced the hand of the natural hair counterculture. To allow the brand to fall to the point of being labeled as some bubbling cauldron of ethnically obscure and culturally ambiguous dollar signs and hair milks is an insult to every woman of color who has ever supported Carol’s Daughter.

At the end of the day, I’m sure this is an incredibly lucrative deal for both Price and Carol’s Daughter — but at what cost? I’m talking more than alienating faithful customers (because there will always be new ones to replace ya’ll #keepitreal) or potential changes in formula (pure speculation on my part, but it has happened before). I’m talking about our economic legacy as a natural hair community. Whether Price and the Carol’s Daughter team believes L’Oreal has what it takes to etch the brand in stone for the next 20 or 30 years is not for me to debate or dispel. My concern is this: that the Carol’s Daughter brand (with Lisa Price as the face) is continuing a dangerous trend of Black owned (or in this case, formerly Black owned) businesses aspiring to be bought out by mainstream companies who prior to now, have quite deliberately ignored us. Our communities will never grow to be economically stable or independent if we continue to let our end-game success be defined by mainstream valuation.

 

I’ll leave you with this quote from Price herself in response to a concerned supporter (who had hoped the news wasn’t true because she feels sadness when Black owned companies are sold to major white corporations), which I found while perusing my Instagram explore feed:

…Please don’t be sad. It is business. It isn’t about color. Honestly. This is a good and phenomenal thing for me, my brand and my family. I am not going anywhere. I am proud to have been able to grow from $100 at a flea market in Brooklyn, making products in my kitchen to being sought by a French conglomerate. Please know, this is good. I promise you.”

 

What are your thoughts on the L’Oreal acquisition of Carol’s Daughter? Savvy business move, or another blow to the natural hair community? Please keep all comments respectful.

 

Sources:

 

http://www.theroot.com/blogs/the_grapevine/2014/10/carol_s_daughter_is_acquired_by_l_oreal_usa.html?wpisrc=topstories

 

http://www.lorealusa.com/press-releases/loreal-usa-signs-agreement-to-acquire-carols-daughter.aspx

 

http://bossip.com/125751/loreal-we-dont-want-black-women-selling-our-cosmetics/

http://www.bet.com/topics/l/lisa-price.html

http://thegrio.com/2012/02/10/beyonce-describes-herself-as-african-american-native-american-french-in-new-loreal-ad/#s:beyonce-true-match-loreal-ad-jpg

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About Christina Patrice

Born, raised, and living in Los Angeles, Christina is BGLH's resident transitioning expert and product junkie. In addition to loving all things hair, she is a fitness novice and advocate of wearing sandals year-round. For more information on transitioning, natural hair, and her own hair journey, visit maneobjective.com. Or, if you like pictures follow Christina on Instagram @maneobjective.

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KP
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KP

She surely hit it big. Who doesn’t hope for that? I don’t think the sell to L’Oreal will move away from their current path of diversification.

I wouldn’t say that it’s a blow to the natural hair community as there are so many more brands to choose from and more coming out every year. My sister got the body wash once years ago when it was only via mail-order, but I haven’t used the products. Plus, they can get expensive. :/

latoya
Guest
latoya

I am sad to hear that news. It seems to me black people sell their family businesses while white and Spanish people keep their businesses. Our beauty is not their beauty. Just look at tv how many natural hair women are portrayed in commercials in tv shows in movies. They do not find beauty in our natural state. Even though they secretly want to look like us but with straight hair. I.e butt,lips,and etc. What are we teaching our daughters and our sons. This is just my opinion and I don’t want anybody to take offense and please forgive me… Read more »

brl
Guest
brl

This is great for Lisa and I cheer that but I am a bit saddened that she’s sold the company. I’m not saddened on the grounds of L’Oreal lightening Beyonce, etc. Christina makes great points about the cultural impact but I am an economist and what I lament is the loss of a successful black owned business. It is critical for our community that there are thriving enterprises that we control. This is how jobs/income/wealth is built in any community. That loss to the community is unfortunate. How many black people will L’Oreal employ in the Carol’s Daughter division and… Read more »

del
Guest
del

I first bought Carol’s Daughter over 10 years ago, well before there were plenty of other natural hair lines to choose from. Since then, I’ve moved on to other brands but I’ll admit, this is kind of disappointing news. I’ve noticed the more “multicultural” looks in the CD advertising; when the company started, it was definitely more “black woman” centered, not the ethnic ambiguity that’s all the rage now. Black women supported this company when CD first started and while I understand Price wanting to branch out (to make more sales?), I could respect it more if the company focused… Read more »

Nikki
Guest
Nikki

I’m sorry, but I thought Beyonce was mixed with other racial backgrounds? What was really the issue with that statement being made in that commercial? Was it not her truth? It’s unfortunate that she had to result to such measures to sell her company, but like most companies that have experienced financial hardships in the past, this is to be expected. When it comes to business in order for one to stay afloat if they can not afford to they partner up with larger companies to stay in business. I don’t feel she “sold out” to the black community, she’s… Read more »

nes
Guest
nes

I wont be purchasing anymore Carols Daughter. The ingredients for sure will not e the same. Another one bites the dust.

Ms. Vee
Guest
Ms. Vee

Basically.

Heather
Guest
Heather

Let me get this straight. Black women stopped buying CD products due to price hikes, formula changes, ect. Black women referred to Nap85 as a sellout when she did YouTube ads with CD products. On any random article, black women openly stated how they no longer buy CD products. CD files for bankruptcy, has to sell. Loreal purchased the company that initially bought CD and secured Ms. Price’s financial future after black women lost interest in the brand. Now we are GRIPING about her no longer being “black owned”?! Seriously? Was she supposed to fold so she could stay “black… Read more »

Kekala
Guest
Kekala

The real question is why instead of her complaining about customer complaints and constantly trying to justify changes that led to her failure as a business owner, why not listen to your customers and go back to the actual QUALITY products that were somewhat worth the price?

I hope her ventures with Loreal fail as well.

Andie
Guest
Andie

Here, here!

iluvedges
Guest
iluvedges

@Heather, Black Women(majority) did not refer Nap85 as a sell-out…maybe 1 or 2. Black Women stopped buying CD products as a whole because she stopped catering to us …nothing to do with price hikes or formula changes. Also this is not a surprise to anyone if they followed CD over the years they would see this was in the cards

A. BelledeSoleil
Guest

I am elated to see the thrival of any business owner and hope that this will give the brand the stability it needs. The original target market (women like her) lost interest in her brand years ago once the ingredient quality went down while the prices stayed up. Then we have new comers to the market offering comparable and better performing products for a lower price. It’s a recipe for business disaster UNLESS you now market to who the products (based on ingredients) are most suitable for…The “multicultural” read (looser curls on down types of hair requiring less emollients etc)… Read more »

liz
Guest
liz

A few years ago, I attended an event where Lisa Price said, plainly, that she was looking to exit from the running of Carol’s Daughter and her definition of success was to be bought by a major brand. Today, she has achieved her goal. I commented then (via twitter, I believe) that why wasn’t success becoming a global black hair care brand, why wasn’t success her buying over other smaller black hair care brands and building her conglomerate, or why wasn’t success offering her brand to the public market (including her customers) through an IPO? I know personally that running… Read more »

Danielle
Guest
Danielle

Yea I understand this is business…but I’m not putting my money towards a company who honestly couldn’t care less about us. They only want our money and they won’t be getting it. Sorry Lisa Price! My money will only go towards Shea Moisture. Hopefully they won’t sell their company.

I’m happy for her though. She has to eat I guess and this probably was a huge step towards her success.

sowhatwhocares
Guest
sowhatwhocares

I think Shea Moisture is no longer black-owned

Shaniqua
Guest

It still is. Richellieu Dennis is still the head of the brand, Sofi Tucker’s grandson.

iluvedges
Guest
iluvedges

really?

WhatUp
Guest
WhatUp

I think this is good for Lisa Price and her family, but it is bad for the black community. L’Oreal don’t just have a problem with black women, they have a problem with women who are not white, period. To them, dark skin is Noemie Lenoir — I know because that was the woman they used to model ‘dark’ foundation circa 2008. I’ve never bought anything from Carol’s Daughter, and I won’t now. But congratulations to her for making money. I hope she can plough it back into the black community somehow.

0101
Guest
0101

Huh.
Well, that’s gross.

[“I know I’ll be with the right shepherd..”] And was the religious allusion really necessary? I mean, she’s signing a merger, not joining a new denomination.

She seemed eager enough about jumping ship, though… So. Perhaps she was never really onboard.
Maybe this IS the best for everyone involved. Especially customers; they know to stear clear now.

[“Please know, this is good (for my wallet). I promise you.”]
Went ahead and fixed that quote. lol

Oy
Guest
Oy

The sad part is that White people actually believe and perpetuate this idea that only Whiteness sells.They act like Whiteness is the end all and be all of beauty (gross). Instead of just calling it lightwashing I would take a step further and say “anglowashing”. Not only do they only select light skin toned women but also women with Anglo like features. Seriously, when is the last time we saw a button nosed/wide nosed celebrity be held as the beauty standard!? Black, especially in America, comes in many shades and yes even a variety of features but there is something… Read more »

YO
Guest
YO

Sad news but in my opinion it’s the nature of the business. It is true that the large multinationals have ignored the black community for many, many years. For whatever reason someone has turned on a light switch in a corner of their brains and all of a sudden the black beauty and cosmetics industry is one worth pursuing and each one of them is on full pursuit to grab the biggest slice. For an already established black owned “small” business, if you don’t sell, your brother/sister next door will. Once the sharks have their foot in the door they… Read more »

Carlee
Guest
Carlee

I never bought Carol’s daughter products to begin with. They are glorified mineral oil. Nonetheless, yet another black, WOMAN-owned business has sold out. What a shame.

Beau Jose
Guest
Beau Jose

I completely agree with this article, all of a sudden they want to buy into a growing market when they have been involved in the perpetuation of the limited mindset that promotes euro-centric beauty to be ideal over all others. All for money. It’s a great business decision for L’Oreal but the PR statement is not fooling anybody. The don’t care about multiculturalism they care about money.

Jasmine
Guest
Jasmine

as long as sheamoisture doesn’t go this route i’m ok and i wish her the best

Adeola @ TheManeCaptain
Guest

This isn’t the first take over by a white company and won’t be last. For those who say that White people haven’t been paying attention to the Black hair industry for so many years need to look under the lens. Companies like “African Pride”, “Dark & Lovely” and majority of big Black hair industries were acquired by white companies and controlled by them.
Rather than getting upset, we should challenge Black millionaires and billionaires to support other Black businesses.
http://www.coilsandglory.com

Darlyn
Guest
Darlyn

I have never bought any Carol’s Daughter products prior to the buyout.

Sorry, but the natural haircare business is becoming more and more competitive everyday. It just seems like CD dropped the ball when it came to marketing.

After this buyout, I’m not sure if I’ll buy any of her products.

Tia
Guest
Tia

I used to use Carol’s Daughter a lot when my hair was relaxed. And my hair drank it up. It was full and healthy. I also bought many of their body products as well and I loved that too. As a natural, the products did not work well for me at all. The products just couldnt hold uo to my My type 4c hair jus

Patrice
Guest
Patrice

Wow me too, except my mom and niece who were relaxed at the time used her products and loved it. Yet, on my Afro textured hair they did absolutely nothing!

Tia
Guest
Tia

I used CD products alot when my hair was relaxed and it worked great for me. I also loved their body products too. When I became a natural, the products just couldn’t hold up against my type 4C hair. And when they started advertising more lighter skinned women and started going all “multicultural” on us, along with the formulation changes, I was truly turned off. I can’t get mad that Lisa Price made a decision to sell CD to L’oreal. Business wise it was a smart move. But I cannot help feel alienated by the brand I invested so much… Read more »

Ashley
Guest
Ashley

Well said. I completly agree. I am a big fan of Shea Moisture and Nubian Heritage and I will be sticking to those.

Mila
Guest
Mila

COMPLETELY offtopic but your hair in your icon is gorgeoussssss

Ne
Guest
Ne

Those Beyonce picture is deceiving on both ends. Because that is Beyonce when she tans and when they white her out. She is in between.

ManestreamBeauty
Guest

I agree Ne. Good point!

LBell
Guest
LBell

From what little I know of mass manufacturing I believe that lower-quality products = more product produced = more shelf coverage (figuratively speaking). If CD had gone back to using the formulas that made them my go-to product company for a few years back in the 90s, I’m assuming the prices would have gone way up, particularly if the company was still using mass production techniques AND it was still trying to cover a bunch of major-player shelves as opposed to only a few scattered beauty salons and supplies (I believe you can get Qhemet Biologics at only a handful… Read more »

curlygirl
Guest
curlygirl

Preach, baby! Preach!!!

Deedeemaha
Guest
Deedeemaha

This is where I have the problem with CD: I want to thank all of you for the support and the love and for being beside me, and I want you to hold my hand as we walk into this next chapter of the Carol’s Daughter life Hold your hand!! Just say you want my money. With the change in her ingredients her once hand is now a claw. The only hand holding I’m doing is holding on to my wallet. How many big companies out there you here saying hold my hand, walk with me. How can I walk… Read more »

addy
Guest
addy

One more newsflash: ALL major conglomerates are questionable. Yet I’d bet money half your bathroom contains products made by them. This is the most sensible comment I have seen. So much so that I just had to comment. I understand people are upset that CD is being bought by L’Oréal and that yes it is a white own organization and that the main interest is getting our money. But why is it suddenly that we are so consumed with where our money is going when we buy hair care products? Are people paying close attention to where their money is… Read more »

Deedeemaha
Guest
Deedeemaha

Personally I’m not questioning where the money goes, I’m questioning where the ingredients went. We purchase things because we find use for them in our lives. They get the job done. CD products just don’t get the job done anymore. I wish her the best she is a business woman. She may loose her once base clients for new clients. Just stop with the hand holding and walk with me comments. It’s a turn off for me

Elle
Guest
Elle

What I DO care about is where I funnel my Black dollars. I have MY values when choosing where my hard-earned cash is going. Yes, I know a (large) portion goes to White/Asian-owned businesses, however I value having the OPTION to support Black enterprise, though I know CD hasn’t been Black-owned for a while. I actually have license to choose such, it’s not a debate. I don’t care that the sale to a conglomerate is a tenet of modern CAPITALISM (not solely the American way, btw) and Keynesian economics, I want to support Black-owned business. When CD sold, it was… Read more »

RB
Guest
RB

Thank you! It IS a big deal. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liliane_Bettencourt This woman is a multi-billionaire because we make her one. If 95% of the consumers of a product are black, the owner of the product should be black PERIOD. Until we get this we will remain at the bottom; praying to white Jesus, begging democrats, talking about black life matters and white privilege. We must see to it that our dollars circulate more than the 6 hours they currently do. It could easily be 6 days just from black women committing to black businesses for everything that has to do with their… Read more »

Adia
Guest
Adia

LOL at getting C’s in econ. Keeping it real!

O
Guest
O

Kinky Kurly is targeted at a bigger market segment i.e. everyone who has curly, coily and kinky hair regardless of the ethnicity of the person. CD is targeted at Black folks which is a smaller segment of the US population.

Over the years I’ve seen lots of different products come onto the market from cereals, condiments to tech products. I also know and have met entrepreneurs in these fields. The ones whose businesses succeed don’t have the best products but have the best marketing. This marketing targets their products at a small demographic that includes a wide range of people.

LBell
Guest
LBell

I came back to respond to this because I recently bought my fourth bottle of Knot Today (4th bottle in 4 years) at Whole Foods and there was a sign underneath that said, “I’m a Best Seller!” I think you’re right about targeted demographic…and now that I think about it Kinky-Curly has always sought out the curly hair dollars rather than just the black hair dollars.

Iva
Guest

Honestly? I don’t care. Carol’s Daughter lost me as a customer loooong ago when Price still owned it. They got rid of their wonderful face oils and their price point was too high. The only good thing about them getting rid of their face oil was that it forced me to start making my own (which also helped me to realize how high their price point was). They are better black-owned natural companies out there.

Jackie
Guest
Jackie

I saw this one coming. Just one glance at the ingredients now (as opposed to years back, when she was whippin in her kitchen..) and I could already tell something was up. I haven’t bought her products in years due to high prices, and shady ingredients (Richelieu Dennis, PLEASE PAY ATTENTION, and learn from this!! I hope you stay true to the integrity of your products..) L’oreal Paris has been (and continues) to ignore black women with African features in their cosmetic standards, advertisements, commercials, and beauty aesthtics since it’s very first day of business. And the “anglo-washing” of their… Read more »

Princess
Guest
Princess

I totally agree with this article. Loreal does not understand us, it understands our money. Wishing all the best to Lisa, she has done incredibly well economically. I could never afford anything in the CD line so neither she nor Loreal will miss or benefit from my money anyway. However, it’s not hypocritical to be sad that a company known for perpetuating white supremacist ideals of beauty is going to try to cater to us. We are sad at the irony. I’m so glad I make my own hair products, and purchase my ingredients from black owned businesses where I… Read more »

kate
Guest
kate

I’ve read the comments to this post and to the one from April about the “bankruptcy”, and most commenters who once used CD products regularly spoke of how the quality decreased as the amount of unnatural and/or cheap ingredients in the products increased, and they STOPPED buying CD. So, the people knew the product deteriorated from excellent to value-oriented, and the people responded. CD decreased in appeal. We stopped or slowed buying. CD stores closed and CD employees have been canned. We shouldn’t mourn the sale of CD to L’Oreal. The natural hair community lost out when CD chose to… Read more »

Ms. Vee
Guest
Ms. Vee

Simply put she sold out just Nikki Walton (Curlynikki) did. I will not be supporting CD any longer. Taliah Waajid and Uncle Funky’s Daughter it is.

Elle
Guest
Elle

Carol’s Daughter brought in $27 million in sales during the last 12 months.”

YEAH…RIGHT!
CD was bankrupt and had to be bought out from under it’s current owners (NOT Lisa Price) to be saved. BTW, I’m not interested in my Black dollars being ‘shepherded’ by Pastor Price into more White-owned pockets than it already is. And I agree with another poster, this junk has been glorified mineral oil for years now. What a mediocre business strategy, reminds me of Daily Candy.

Anyone know who the CURRENT majority stake owners in in Shea Moisture/Sundial are?

umm...
Guest
umm...

Bankruptcy doesn’t mean you haven’t made sales. Bankruptcy simply means your gross sales (net profits) have not been sufficient to cover overhead expenses or the other costs of business, which leaves a person or entity in debt. Im pretty sure that L’Oreal would not have purchased CD without her being able to prove that she holds a significant market share (evident by her sales)–although CD could not balance her books, Im certain L’Oreal won’t have these cash flow issues CD was having. Thought I’d clear that up.

Sheamoisture’s CEO is a black man…I think!

Danielle
Guest
Danielle

Aaaaand another sellout. It’s like our community is hell-bent on digging our own financial graves. No, I won’t be purchasing Carol’s Daughter products anymore. Let her new “multicultural” audience support the brand now. Sure, it will be remembered for 20 to 30 years — as a wonderful advertising platform. It will not be remembered for what it stood for: Blacks loving themselves and no longer seeking the standards of White beauty. Price’s hard work will be forgotten. And her first customers (Black sistas) have already been. And what was with that response? “Please don’t be sad. It’s just business.” Does… Read more »

Bubbles
Guest
Bubbles

Carol’s Daughter was only good for me when my hair was relaxed. That was back in my middle school days. I learned from like four or five years ago that CD changed its ingredients, so I stopped using the products.

I’m about to rock some sarcasm. You have been warned. It’s so WONDERFUL for Lisa Price to sell her brand to a company that wants to hop on the natural hair care movement.

joce
Guest
joce

L’Oréal also owns the brand Lancôme. And guess who is on the print advertisements ? Lupita Nyong’o.

umm...
Guest
umm...

What is the significance of Lupita Nyong’o being on the advertisements for Lancome, a company also owned by L’Oreal?

Nancy B.
Guest
Nancy B.

I do wish Price the very best. I haven’t used her products in years. Consumers with natural have many options today, and it’s for the better. I think as a group, naturals are a bit more conscious about products.

lv
Guest
lv

I was never a big fan of CD products. Maybe it was the timing of my transition.I think the change in her products for the “not so better” coincided with my transition in 2011 ‑2013. I wanted to give LP some $$$$, but the products just did not work as well as the smaller companies –shescentit, alikay, camille rose, etc. even shea moisture worked better. i can almost certaintly say that my dollars will not be flowing to this Loreal brand–Naw!

cacey
Guest
cacey

well daaaaammmn if beyonce is gonna identify as native american and french in addition to black, then i might as well go on and identify my black self as native american (from my great great great great great grandmother whose name nobody even knows) and scotch-irish-english- for the at least *four* white genetic donors i know of to have contributed to my “blended, diversified” black heritage from way back during slavery. a minor point. but that’s all i wanted to say.

umm...
Guest
umm...

But what happened to the thumbs up option!!??/ Some people are going IN and I would like them to know that I hear them! Dang!!

Ms.Personal
Guest
Ms.Personal

Agreed. Thumbs up to that!!!

Michelle
Guest
Michelle

YAAASSSSS!!!!! Me too!!!

Carlee
Guest
Carlee

Good on GBLH for bringing back the voting system! I don’t know why it was taken away in the first place. This one is not as good, design-wise, as it was before, but I am glad BGLH listened.

naps1
Guest
naps1

yep,yep thumbs up!

Sharon
Guest
Sharon

Extremely disheartening — period. I have never used Carol’s Daughter’s products. But as a natural newbie of a couple of years, their products were definitely on my radar to experiment with. So how can I be disheartened one could ask? Well, I’ll tell you. I am coming through a tremendous learning curve of finally being in a love affair with my kinky crown and know that my hair loves me back if I take care of and respect its nature the way my ethnicity entitles it to be loved, admired and taken care of. I am encouraged and excited to… Read more »

Melissa
Guest
Melissa

I agree with everything you said Sharon. I thumbs down your comment by accident. Sorry about that.

Kim jones
Guest

Its a story that starts off inspiring, but a big disappointment in the end. It’s a shame that reaching a bigger audience took preference over catering to the black community’ s needs. But that’s business.

My discovery of Flaxseed Gel has changed everything for me. I no longer need to buy commercial Shea butter and creams. So I’m out!

Mocha
Guest
Mocha

I have to comment on this issue. Please do not get upset at what I say. First and foremost. We have been singled out and dang near left out for years. We fought for years to integrate schools, lunch counters, and other public places. All we wanted was to be treated equally. Fast forward to recent years and we have made our own choice to be seperate but equal. Listen Lisa Price did what business owners set out to do. Years ago a white company would have never looked our way. We are making progress. We have to understand that… Read more »

Uli
Guest

Mocha,what you fail to realize is,this might be a good journey for her,meaning her pockets are fatter now,but the ingredients to her products are not.Her products will be watered down.When she first started her brand,she was catering too her own,the black woman. She felt the need to create something for us because there were nothing for us who had natural hair. Now she done sold out to the white man,who has ill intentions for this brand. Carol’s daughter will not cater to black women anymore,and carol’s daughter in 10 years will be the face of white women.

Sylvia
Guest

Very well researched! Thank you for taking the time to lay out the facts and then insert your own thoughts. I for one believe in supporting the small business. The natural hair community is still very strong and as some product lines move to main stream stores, I think that online community will continue to have a large influence on whether people will purchase those products. Also, I wanted to comment on the use of the word “multicultural.” I think larger companies are using that word in the wrong way!

Delores Burke
Guest
Delores Burke

My comment is this:I agree with the author of this article saying we cannot continue to build brands that are for us and then sell out to larger corporations which in not ‑so-distance past did not recognize us as potential customers. I’m deeply saddened that she felt that was the only way to go. At the end of the day, it’s about the dollars. L’Oréal bought out Soft Sheen and the products are not the same. OAN, Bob Johnson sold BET…and it is not the same. So we have to be very careful in allowing one or two companies to… Read more »

Mila
Guest
Mila

I have never bought Carols Daughter but this sale makes me sad. The company being “polyethnic” defeats the purpose IMO but hey congrats on her getting coins I guess.

Sidenote: whats wrong with Beyonce identifying as multiracial? Isn’t she? Seems petty to complain about that to me.

James
Guest
James

It’s the same here in the UK. A very successful black radio station was bought out by a white company. After buying the company, the newly white owned radio station sacked all the black staff that made the radio station what it was. They banned one of the most popular slots where the black community could phone in and talk about black issues affecting the black community and replaced it with some dance music that appealed to the wider community. They then picked off each black radio presenter, sacking them one by one. We never learn as a race. We… Read more »

reese
Guest
reese

Im glad a black person grew a business string enough to be bought out. So many of our businesses dont make it for a variety of reasons. I think it was a good move for Lisa Price as she has ALOT of competition now in the natural hair business and I personally forgot about Carols Daughter but used it exclusively years ago. She sold the company in the nick of time. I think sometimes black people get to emotionally attached to things when we should see that its just business-yes its a black business but its just business.

Danielle
Guest
Danielle

Where to start…while I do agree with the overall jist of the article, I can’t help but think of crabs in a barrel. Now, i’m not saying that anyone is trying to hold her down, i’m just saying, it seems like we can never be happy when someone “makes it.” There is always a negative tone when someone black goes mainstream, there’s a hint of the green-eyed monster, in my opinion. I wonder if that’s what happens in the Latin culture, or the Jewish culture, or the Asian culture. I would have liked to have seen the company go to… Read more »

liz
Guest
liz

The issue, In My Opinion, isn’t that we aren’t “happy” when someone “makes it”. It’s that no one considers anyone as “making it” unless they are bought out by Eurocentric companies. It’s interesting that when we shake our heads at the company some people will go to (despite said company being racist/questionable for decades before), others say it’s worth it. WHO is it worth it for? That company? The black community? Why must the Black Community sell itself to the White Community before it’s considered successful–and why when the Black Community tries to urge its member in a different direction… Read more »

liz
Guest
liz

I wonder if Lisa Price had done a special IPO — first inviting her customers and doing a roadshow in the black community whether she would have raised the money she felt necessary to grow her business.
With all these emotional comments, are there investors here?

Adrienne
Guest
Adrienne

Let us not delude ourselves, the products themselves will be compromised in pursuit of the all mighty $$$$! Goodbye Carol’s Daughter.… Our relationship was good as long as we were both keeping it “100” and had the same goal in mind…excellent products to promote health in “the Black Woman’s” hair care experience — I assure you, that is not L’Oreal’s expected outcome.

Monica
Guest

Acquisitions are rarely beneficial for consumers and CD being acquired by a mega-conglomerate is just another example of this. Will the quality of the product improve? Probably not. Will the price decrease? Nope.

It’s good news for Price, but there isn’t much reason for anyone else to celebrate.

BigJ
Guest
BigJ

Sylvia, I agree. I also think some companies are using the term multiculturalism incorrectly and in a way that will hurt minorities in the long-term. Minorities have to be careful, but it can be hard. On all levels and with all issues, minorities have been rejected so categorically that they often take any attention given as good. One historical example is affirmative action. As the Supreme Court ruled in 2012 in the joint U of Michigan cases, direct quotas (ex. When a company decides to hire say exactly one Black or one Black Woman). Affirmative Action is a good program,… Read more »

Susie
Guest
Susie

“To put it plainly, L’Oreal wants our money” To put it plainly, ALL businesses want our money! To put it plainly, keep your money to yourself. Business is business and the bottomline is GREEN. You don’t like how L’Oreal rolls, keep your bank roll to yourself. I’m happy for Lisa Price. She took, what I consider, some poor quality products and made a killing forking over ownership to what I’m sure amounted to a lot of green. It’s called BUSINESS. Business is not your friend. Business is not here to validate your existence. And I bet no one else is… Read more »

GenuineAfrican
Guest
GenuineAfrican

It always amazes me how more ignorant black people are about “blackness” than other races. We are always ready to accuse others of racism when we are the bigger racists against our own kind. I’d like to address the Beyonce issue because it really irritates me and I think its time we lay it to bed for good. Beyonce IS AND ALWAYS HAS BEEN LIGHT!!! The pic she’s wearing green is not even her true complexion she’s lighter than that!!! She’s closer to the toner on the L’oreal ad!!! Stop being jealous just cause you are darker! Two, (I haven’t… Read more »

Oli_Queeny
Guest
Oli_Queeny

I don’t see how this is racist. You know, in this world, black community is always in the shadow. Yellow people have respect for their culture but black people are always treated like nothing. We are losing our culture, forgetting our source, becoming more white than black (not the skin but in our appearances, in our habitudes, and white society don’t ever think about what we need, just only the white market because they are many in this market. So Carol’s daughter was one of these society which proved that black people are also in the game, that the world… Read more »

larissa
Guest
larissa

Lisa Price made a smart move, business wise.

What black businesses need is financial backing…there is a need for black conglomeratea, black investors, black shareholders, black equity firms.

It takes a large community to support businesses. Small businesses are cool but we also need corporate/large business if we want to sustain black economics as well as flourish.

Ms. Vee
Guest
Ms. Vee

Black owned hair products y’all MUST try.

http://www.adivanaturals.com/

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[…] and again, black consumers reference the fate of other black-owned hair-care companies such as Soft Sheen, founded in 1964 by Edward and […]

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