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Why It Bothers Me That People Assume I’m Mixed Because of My Hair

• Aug 21, 2014

Portia Cole Natural Hair Twist Out.PNG

by Portia of huneybflyy.com (pictured above)

One of the things I love about my natural hair is its versatility. I can wear a kinky twist out one day and the next day I can be seen wearing shiny, smooth curls. Manipulating my hair has always been fun for me. On the rare occasion that I do wear a wash n’ go and people ask “Did you cut your hair?,” I just giggle silently at their lack of knowledge about shrinkage. Sometimes people just can’t wrap their brain around the fact that hair can be gigantic one day and short the next.

However, there is still one question that always seems to rub me the wrong way. “Are you mixed?” Before I say anything else, I’d like to make it crystal clear that I have nothing against my bi-racial natural haired sistas. They are very much a part of the natural hair movement and that makes me proud. I enjoy seeing women who are bi-racial and tri-racial embracing their natural curls and kinks. They have had to learn to love their unique hair, just as I have had to learn to love my own.  I have love for everyone and I don’t discriminate. With that said, allow me to explain why I’m not exactly thrilled when someone compliments my hair and then asks “Are you mixed?”

The beauty of black hair is that there are so many amazing different textures. No two natural ladies will ever have the same head of hair. Over the course of my natural hair journey, I’ve seen black women who have natural waves, tight coils, kinks, kinky coils, springy ringlets and everything in between. They’ve blown it out, worn it straight, curled it, crimped it and set it. They’ve done it all and worn it all. It’s beautiful seeing that there is such a variety of hair within my own race.

I am an African American woman. Of course I’m not sure if I am 100% African, but I know I’m not bi-racial as my parents are both African American and so are their families. I don’t look exotic and my features are not unique. Naturally, I have kinky curls that go every which way. Typically, I wear twist outs and it’s sort of become my signature look. I also wear roller sets and sometimes, I will let my hair kink up without a curl in sight. I consider my hair to be beautiful no matter what kind of curl or kink I may be sporting. I take pride in knowing that I am a black woman and my hair is beautiful in its own way.

So, when someone asks if I’m mixed, it doesn’t sit well with me. It’s almost as if they are asking me because they can’t believe that someone, who is black could have a beautiful head of hair. Surely, I must be mixed with something. A few months ago I was in the hallway at work speaking to a co-worker. Another fairly new co-worker walked by and said hello. We’ll just call her Jane. Later that day, the co-worker I had been speaking to told me that Jane asked her if I was mixed. When my co-worker told her I wasn’t, Jane was shocked. Meanwhile, I’ve seen and said hello to Jane several times before, but that day was her first time seeing my natural hair free. When I met her, I was wearing braids as a protective style and she never asked that question.

Someone once told me that I should take it as a compliment that I even get asked that question. I looked at them as if they had ten heads. Why should I accept it as a compliment? Why should I be proud that someone thinks I’m something other than what I am? I don’t feel proud, but rather annoyed. Black women can have beautiful heads of hair. Hair that bounces and moves. Hair that is shiny, thick and soft. Contrary to popular belief, our hair does not resemble a universal texture of “brillo” and I’ve never seen anyone with such a texture despite the naysayers. We have hair and it’s more than possible for it to be fabulous no matter the texture. The next time someone asks if I’m mixed, I’ll simply tell them no. I’m just a plain ole black woman who has luscious hair and there are millions of black women like me.

How do you feel when asked if you’re mixed?

 

Portia is a wife and mother who enjoys making things and people look pretty! As a graduate of Rowan University, Portia has an insatiable craving for natural hair, beauty, and fashion, but she also enjoys traveling and home decor. If you’d like to know more about her, visit her blog at huneybflyy.com

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182 Comments on "Why It Bothers Me That People Assume I’m Mixed Because of My Hair"

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Rachael
Guest

Well put!

Caty
Guest

I find it surprising people would ask if you’re mixed since you look african american and you hair doesn’t look typically mixed to me

naturally Tee
Guest

Ok your statement is ignorant just like her coworkers her hair doesn’t look particularly mixed what does that mean? what is mixed hair? Their are mixed people men and women with 2a-4c hair there is no category called mixed hair.

Caty
Guest

oh behave. Yeah… I know people have different hair textures, since I’m multiracial lol. If I saw this woman I would know straight away she isn’t directly mixed, since she doesnt look it. her features look afro-american or caribbean. I think secretly you americans take it as a compliment to be told you have mixed features, it’s very sad and I feel sorry for you

coffeeandfingernails
Guest

I get this question once in a blue moon and my response is always, “No more so than we all are.”

Tee
Guest

I hear the same thing. I don’t like it either. I am a brown as brown comes so someone stating that I am mixed because I have long hair is just strange. Since when did my hear determine my culture. Yes, I am Caribbean but that should make difference. I usually wear my hair in a bun. But when I wear it out, Lord Jesus, the comments are always. “so, you just black, are you sure?” “Do you have indian in you?” “I never met a black person with long hair.” I hear this from black and white people. smh

April
Guest

You’re not a plain black woman, black cant be plain! That whole you should take it as a compliment thing is disgusting. Nothing wrong with biracial women or men at all. Still people like to champion their diverse beauty and not ours. It’s disgusting to suggest a person who is primarily black shouldn’t take pride in that, or that he or she can’t be beautiful.

Nic
Guest
When I first big chopped I was asked if I had a jheri curl, I was asked if my hair is not a jheri curl well then “are you half and half?”. I was also asked “why did you cut off your long hair to do THAT?”, and when I said my hair was natural now, I got “YOUR HAIR SO CURLY!? o_O”. Since then I am constantly hit with the joke, “you sure (insert my dad’s name) is your father?” followed by an lol if we’re online or a haha if we’re in person at least once per month… Read more »
Gloria
Guest

I don’t get asked if I’m mixed, people just don’t believe me when I say I’m 100% african (from Congo to be exact) or I don’t “look” african …I usually get carribean or just black american lol & my hair 3c 4a shoulder length
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/image-22.jpg[/img]

Dananana
Guest

I’m not trying to throw shade or shatter your world girl, but…even if you are 100% Congolese, you probably aren’t exactly 100% African. African countries experienced trade routes and colonization like most of the world, so admixtures happen on the mother continent just as they do everywhere else.

If you don’t believe me, you should get a genetic analysis done. They’re kind of pricey, but they raise and answer interesting questions.

Dananana
Guest

Down me all you want, it won’t change the fact that most Africans of all nationalities will find that they have a genetic admixture of some sort if they get their genome sequenced. European-African trade predates the 1500s, and genome sequencing gives you information about your heritage from centuries ago.

mlank64
Guest
Dananana, you are right!!!!! I did a DNA testing just recently. My ancestry showed I’m 86% African. The rest was European and Native American. Yet, I very recently was told by my cousin that someone inquired if I was mixed because of my curls. I’m a dark skinned AA.…funny when I was relaxed, no one ever would question if I was “mixed”. I agree with the author…it’s rather annoying and I have to really bite my tongue when I answer the question. Since I’ve had my DNA testing I can drive the point much further. Most AA have anywhere from… Read more »
cassandra
Guest

Actually there is such a thing as typical black hair. I’m a hairstylist and i find african americans tend to have a loser pattern than africans. Typical african hair is 4a/b/c etc.ethiopians and somalians are mixed with arab and european. personally, i believe all hair types are beautiful

Afro queen
Guest
Um You can be 100% African and still be light skin. You don’t know as much as you think you do. It has already been proven that Africans have the most genetic diversity, it is not the result of mixing.Remember its where modern humans originated. We don’t look alike and our physical diversity is seen even in our ancient art. Just because there was colonization does not mean that every light skin African is mixed, most aren’t. It is ignorant and insulting to say someone doesn’t look African all because their looks don’t conform to the western samboo stereotype.The reason… Read more »
mlank64
Guest

I stated such.…“The fact is that African hair is as diverse as any other ethnicity. There is no such thing as “typical” African hair. We are too diverse to be put in a box. Our diverse beauty should not be validated only if it is paired with non black ethinicity. I’ll call out anyone if I get approached again with that ignorant question.

Dananana
Guest

Where did I mention skin color? That’s right, I didn’t. If you read my later comment, you’ll see that I understand that phenotype doesn’t indicate genotype. My comment had nothing to do with her physical aspect in any way. She’s probably not 100% African because barely anyone is in this era due to gene flow.

Afro queen
Guest
No one is taking it to heart, but your assertions of black people being mix is just wrong. Most black people do not live in america and most aren’t mixed. Only some Afro-Latinos and Black Americans have been proven to have recent ancestry from other groups. Colonization didn’t not produce a large mix population in Africa as America, with the exception of South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe. There mix population are a small minority. And most of those mix people do not inter-marry with black people(another story for another day). So most black Africans regardless of colonization or how they… Read more »
Dananana
Guest

Afro queen, I think you may think that I’m saying most Africans have a large percentage of European DNA. I’m not. You’re right, admixtures are largely dependent on where you are in the continent, but a lot of people are going to have at the very least 0.5%. It’s not a huge amount of DNA…but it’s still there, and it still makes the other 99.5% less than 100%.

Dae
Guest
Why does any of this matter anyway? Who gives a flip about whether you are mixed, black, white, or an alien. Everybody comes here to learn about taking care of their hair in an effort to have long, thick hair. Which, by the way, is what a majority of women want. Not just African Americans. Going back and forth with everyone about who is mixed and who is not is irrelevant. Mixed or not, everyone’s hair is beautiful. Your hair is not more beautiful because it is a looser texture. Just like a lady with a tighter curls hair is… Read more »
Nappy 4C Rocks
Guest

LMAO! now that was shade, hahaha

shameia
Guest

Why did this get thumbed down?lol

silkynaps
Guest

The question, “Are you mixed?” is just a glaring example of ignorance. If someone asks the question, it’s obvious that they do not understand how genetics work and should have paid more attention in biology class during discussions of Punnet squares.

If someone doesn’t know the answer, it’s a reminder that so many people of African descent have lost their family’s history due to tragic effects of slavery, war, and/or colonization.

Dananana
Guest
Speaking as an American, I’m especially annoyed when this question is asked because slavery left an indelible mark on the heritage of everyone within the Diaspora. Unless your parents or grandparents immigrated within the last century, fellow Black Americans, expect to learn that you’re at least 10% European should you get a genetic analysis done. Both of my parents are very obviously Black, and I’m barely 70% African : The crux of the issue is that you can’t determine someone’s genetic makeup just by looking at them. You can only tell what their most obvious heritages are, and even then,… Read more »
Redseouls
Guest

In my humble opinion: the only people who ask this question are folks trying to fit you within their own insecure internal hierarchies. It doesn’t serve any other purpose.”

PREACH!!!

mlank64
Guest

My DNA showed 86% African…particularly Ivory Coast/Ghana, spread out throug Benin, Togo, Nigeria, and Senegal.

5% percent Native American…which btw is very high for African Americans as most do not have Native American…some that do have maybe 2% or 3%.

8% percent divided among Great Britain, Irelan and the Iberian Penisula… (surprised as well)…most of been those Porguegese slave traders during the middle passage..who knows but its there in my dna marker.

BayouPrincess
Guest

I used AncestryDNA and I was surprised also to be 25% European with Black people on both sides for generations. People used to ask me the same question and I would also say no when indeed I am mixed and just didn’t know it. Portia, I hate to say it but you probably are mixed too.

iamnotasian
Guest

@Dananana with all the nationalities in your blood…? Do you consider yourself BLACK?

Dananana
Guest

Umm. I said that I did in my comment. I self-identify as Black. I always have. Both of my parents are Black. My grandparents are Black. The thing is, just because you appear Black, and socially identify as Black, doesn’t mean that’s all you are. Genetics are funny like that.

Karen J
Guest

I always get “you must have Indian or something in your family”. I say we shouldn’t let it get under our skin. We need to just keep educating folks about proper hair care, and thanks to forums and blogs like these the message is getting out slowly but surely.

Tina
Guest
I have been asked this question by my doctor who is from Africa. I wore a wash and go to an appointment. My hair is primarily coils and ringlets. She asked me how did I get my hair to do that. I told her that it grows like this from my scalp. She then proceeded to tell me that I must be mixed with something because her hair doesn’t do that. My response was “No, both my parents are black, and their parents were black”. I was amazed that someone in the field of medical science would ask such a… Read more »
O
Guest

Doctors generally aren’t also genetic research scientists in the traditional sense, so they are just as ignorant as the person walking down the street on racial matters.

oldfaker
Guest

My brother just told me that a female friend asked if I was Indian and another if I was his sister LOL. I been asked if get my hair from my parents. My reply was I’m a combination of both and my hair comes from the Motherland Africa. I don’t get the mixed question more than likely because I’m dark skin. I think you have take it in stride (keep on walking)

Stace
Guest
Well I am dark skinned and I get the mixed question all the time. One being the length of my hair pre chop and now because of hair texture and thickness. Also,apparently something about my features I’m told looks mixed (what that could be I have no idea because no one ever says what). Oh and then there is the too pretty to be just black nonsense. I have no idea what is wrong with people. People seem to think I’m mixed with east indian. I’ve gotten this response from arabs and east indians as well as black and white… Read more »
O
Guest

If you are American you should tell them all Americans whether they are Black or White whose families have been here for centuries have mixed heritage due to the slave trade.

You may as well give ignorant people a lesson in American history.

kyle
Guest

All I want to know is; IS SHE SINGLE?

0101
Guest

>Portia is a wife and mother
>Portia is a wife
>a wife and mother

But what I want to know is- can you read?

Deb
Guest

wrong website.

Aiych
Guest

boy BYE

Di
Guest
i just want to correct her and say, everything about being a black woman is exotic and unique! -toots horn- but seriously… i get told i look latina/black or dominican a lot by people of all races. it annoys me when people ask if i am mixed then after they ask that their next question is “is it weave?” like, those can be the only two explanations for this hair i have. had a man tell me to take looking mixed as a compliment to. so not looking black is a compliment? i don’t understand. even being featured on here,… Read more »
Sabi
Guest

A lot of you so called offended ones do this in the manner of pushing someone out of the coveted type 4 box when their hair gets to a certain length or is a bit “too silky”…Naptural85 for example.

Romma
Guest
Extremely well put! I couldn’t agree with you more! It’s not about being mixed, but the fact that people think African American woman just can’t have long or attractive hair. It’s sad and I’m glad that this post was made. All I can hope is that the natural hair moment makes people realize that no matter your skin color or race that hair is hair. Hair, on any person, is different. It’s never exactly the same, but always beautiful. It always brings a smile to my face to see a woman returning(there is no going natural..we return to natural) to… Read more »
Allegra
Guest

I don’t get asked if I’m bi-racial but people have said to me; “I’d go natural if I had good hair like you.” It’s funny how we don’t know our own hair, I tell people, it’s called hair manipulation! LOL Twist outs, braid outs and gel all manipulate my hair. The diversity of natural hair is amazing but it’s a shame that so many people don’t know it.

Emily
Guest

I can’t imagine asking ANYONE if they’re mixed race. That’s just plain rude. If anything, I would say “what’s your heritage?” if I was curious about their background. To judge someone’s heritage based on their hair style? Really?! Not ok.

naturale15
Guest

people wonder why you’re mixed, because you look mixed (I’m just being Honest). society doesnt know that black people have different curl types and stuff especially older generations they’ll question and wonder. Everytime older people in my family see me they say well your not black you got some white in you or you got a wig on. What im trying to say is.… not everybody understands our hair.. so they think were either mixed or have a weave.

mimi
Guest
It’s because black people have believed all the lies told to them for years through colonisation and slavery, so they think 100% black can’t be beautiful, any sign of beauty and we begin to immediately associate it with something “other”. Even though these features existed long before foreigners came to Africa. Also no one will be believe that all their hair needs is MOISTURE and they’d be on their way to luscious hair too, instead you hear things like “my hair is not like yours etc”, you’d be surprised at how different moisturised hair looks from hair that hasn’t seen… Read more »
mia
Guest

good hair girl problems. cry me a river.

jessann
Guest

I am so glad you brought this up! I am asked this all the time and it drives me crazy. Like we aren’t capable of growing beautiful hair unless there is white or Indian in our blood. Granted, my grandparents are mixed with Indian and white lol, but I hate the assumption!

Jasmine
Guest

i just say, “yea, i’m black and a touch of black sorry if I’m not as exotic as you thought lol”

Boyhead
Guest
As a brown girl I remember being told that I couldn’t possibly have hair like I had on my head. This was when I was relaxed and my hair looked like the hair you find on corn…you know that silky stuff, but black.… And when me, this brown girl would walk and my hair didn’t look like other relaxed heads, well I just had to have weave. My first lady at my church and apparently most of the other women in church were sure I had weave — so much so that one Sunday during meet/greet she hugged me, then… Read more »
Queen
Guest

Yeah so I rolled my eyes hard AF at this article. So, we’re all going to sit here and pretend the vast majority of “mixed” persons do not have the same hair as the vast majority of blacks? And please, oh please, do not respond with “but but we’s all mixed anyway” no, we are not and that’s a-okay. If that we’re not the case sites like this geared SPECIFICALLY towards black women hair care would not be needed.

And may the down votes play on.

Kendreya
Guest

No they do not have the same hair as a vast majority of blacks. It isn’t as kinky. That’s what I hate. It’s as if society thinks mixed peoples hair can only be thick and curly. But in it’s natural state black hair is thicker than mixed hair. As for curly it just depends on the person.

Stace
Guest
People can’t even tell who and who is is mixed as to who isn’t mixed. For arguments sake lets take “mixed” as being someone who has at least one grandparent who is of another race other than “black”. With all honesty before we knew that Pres. Obama’s mother was white did anybody think he was mixed? I have friends who fit this description of mixed who have “kinkier” hair than I do. I guess the great-great-grandparent of mine that was of another race- I guess his or hers hair gene just trickled down the gene pool “lottery” to me huh?… Read more »
Dananana
Guest
White folks in the U.S. tend to have African admixtures too. Most of my relatives on 23andMe are White. Of course it isn’t talked about–most of those I interacted with (who actually responded) are shocked about their percentages of Black DNA and are loathe to discuss it. I feel that’s because they know there’s a limited number of possibilities of how they inherited it, and most of them are ugly. I don’t know about how frequently Europeans have Black DNA vs. Americans because the culture surrounding slavery was slightly different, but there are still likely to be some due to… Read more »
Kelea
Guest
Hi Stace, I would argue that some characteristics such as fuller lips or very tight curls are indeed more common among people of Africain descent than among people of other races. And maybe Portia has looser or longer curls because of her non-african ancestors. There is no way to know really. Growing up in Senegal, I haven’t been surrounded by many women who wore their hair naturally and it’s not until I came to the US that I became familiar with “natural” Afro hair. In a nutshell, I don’t know if a lot of Afro-American female have “mixed-looking” hair because… Read more »
Stace
Guest
Don’t know where you got that I think anything about black features are less than attractive. You may be reading in a little too deep. I’m simply stating what is the historic stereotypical black phenotype here in America. People assume that any divergence from the accepted “assumed” phenotype means that you have to have admixture of another race. It’s ridiculous. Now you have people arguing with native Nigerians who know their family history that their skin is too light to be African. People forget that the hutu and the tutsi were divided by the european by physical characteristics. Those who… Read more »
Mayuri
Guest

You basically summed up the words I’ve been thinking all along. I get asked that all the time and It’s not a compliment to me, it’s an insult.

.T.
Guest

i get this question more so because of my hair length than my 4b/c texture, particularly when I wear it straight. it can be annoying.

g
Guest

i rarely get asked if i am mixed. to be honest, i take it as a compliment when i do…only because mixed people, in our society, are generally considered more attractive or better than, just primarily one race. i am not saying it’s true, i am just saying that’s what general society projects. it’s something that i wish i didn’t like or want…because i want all women, dark to light, to be think of themselves as beautiful…without needing to be mixed.

anastasia
Guest
Hello G =) I appreciate your honesty and your self-awareness. I think many of us have been in that space but would never admit to it. I’ve seen what you speak of: the wide grin, the pleasurable feeling of validation which makes the eyes sparkle, and the extra pep in one’s step when this toxic question wrapped in white hegemonic thought has been posed to an individual. Personally, I find the question insulting and extremely anti-black and like you, would like all women “to think of themselves as beautiful w/o needing to be mixed” as a prerequisite for beauty. This… Read more »
Kelea
Guest

Amen!

Fatima
Guest

Thank you dear Sister

Sandi
Guest

I wonder if the author thinks she looks mixed

Portia C.
Guest

I clearly stated in the article that I do not look exotic or have unique features. Therefore, no. I do not believe I look mixed.

Dani
Guest

I get irritated too!! Because when people ask of I’m mixed or say “your hair is pretty for a black girl” it’s basically insinuating that my hair (or just me in general) is too beautiful to just be black. It’s just lack of knowledge, but yes it grinds my gears too!

Nyny
Guest

My sentiments exactly.

Jacky
Guest

The author is trying to say that she sees being asked if she’s mixed as an insult rather than a compliment because it promotes the annoying notion that black women can’t have nice hair unless their blood line is mixed with another race which has nice hair. I hate that notion too. I think any natural who’s proud of their black race would hate it too. So I understand where she’s coming from.

Ashley
Guest
I’ve had strangers ask me this annoying question too many times. Literally last week my neighbor knocked on my door (who is a stranger to me), we start to chat, he asks me if I’m mixed. He also asked me if my mom was white and goes on to ask if my dad is white as well. I reply no to both questions he says that his mom is a “high yellow” so.…The man was around the same shade of brown that I am, so I really can’t understand. What should the appropriate reaction be to someone who asks such… Read more »
Sheena
Guest
I just want to say this article is on point! You’ve touched upon every frustration I’ve had to deal with regarding the mixed question. I am dark-skinned with 4C hair and I get this question almost every time I wear a twist out. Its sad that some of our people feel that being mixed gives you “good hair”. I know a few girls who are mixed and I’ve seen girls who are mixed with hair just as thick as mine. People fail to realize its not about having “good texture” its simply about taking care of what grows out of… Read more »
Yabby
Guest
*standing ovation* This explains my sentiments 100%. I was in the locker room at the gym with my friend one day and a girl approached me and said I love your hair!! It’s so curly. My hair was in a puff that had been blown out and twisted out, so it was pretty manipulated. The girl went on to ask, are you mixed? And I said no I’m not. The conversation ended abruptly and awkwardly. And then my friend who was with me in the locker room later on asked, ‘why weren’t you flattered by her asking that question?’ This… Read more »
cacey
Guest

a girl asked me a couple weekends back if i was mixed. because of my hair, of course. but get this: my hair was in a bun. a friggin BUN on top of my head. 0_0

Chrissie
Guest

Why does it even matter if someone is mixed? It’s like some have to justify why someone has a certain hair texture (or complexion). Nobody knows their full history. And some don’t even know their ethnicity or race for different reasons, how you gonna get your answers then?

CC
Guest

I haven’t got the mixed question because I’m dark skinned I guess, though I have been told that I don’t have “typical” black hair, therefore that’s why it’s so long and thick right? Lol. Baring in mind my hair type is 4b. It is a joke that so many of us are walking around with dry, broken hair and every time they’re presented with an example of a black woman with long, thick hair that person is assumed to be a genetic exception to the rule. All you need is moisture people!

Darlyn
Guest

One time someone told me “Oh,you can wear your hair natural because you have the right type of hair for it”.

It hurt so much to hear that.

Mind you, the person who told me that hasn’t seen their natural texture in ages. I know because they’re a close relative of mine.

Ashlee
Guest
I too despise this question. Or I really dislike when I get asked more than once if my hair has chemicals in it to make it this curly. Umm no this is the way God made me and asking me multiple times to reassure yourself isn’t going to make me change my answer. No no and no black is beautiful and there is no right look. But thank the lord more and more of us are starting to learn to embrace and love ourselves the way God made us because maybe eventually other cultures will learn to accept that Black… Read more »
Stace
Guest
Exactly. Black hair is not one texture. Slave traders saved the heads of the Africans they took out of Africa. Later Africans covered their heads with scarves for various reasons. So tell me now, how anyone can sit here, and say for certain that all Africans had the exact same hair texture. All Europeans do not even have the same hair type or color, and they evolved in much closer proximity to one another than the vast continent of Africa to which Africans evolved on. How is it acceptable that European traits come in a range, but African traits are… Read more »
Autumn
Guest
This is literally the story of my life. I was born with three different textures on my head: wavy, curly, and kinky hair. I have always been asked this question, especially cause my mother is light-skinned with light brown eyes and my father has the typical “look” of the black man. They both identify as African American and contrary to what people think, I have my father’s hair. Even at school people doubt my hair (and it’s the black people that doubt not the white) and one time when I had my hair straightened,this black girl came up to me… Read more »
Stace
Guest

I had a Jamaican friend who once said of her own Jamaican people, that the only black people in Jamaica that look good are the ones who are mixed. I thank God everyday I didn’t grow up with this type of mentality or adopt it into my own thinking, because it is disgusting. My first though was isn’t your mother black? Are you saying that your mother is ugly? SMH

JazzWife
Guest

I’ve been asking if I was mixed once or twice and found it baffling. My daughter, however, gets this question constantly. She hates it and is deeply annoyed by the silliness (and the assumptions) behind the question.

Stephanie Powell
Guest
I have 4 curl patterns in my hair, 3b 3c 4a and 4b and several different textures also. Sometimes my hair looks like it’s permed and other times it looks kinky curly. I get the whole ‘are you mixed with something’ question a lot when my hair is out and curly but I never know how to answer because I am 70% black Caribbean but 30% Scottish and Indian but I don’t think the other races in me is why my hair is like this. As said I’m 70% black so chances are my hair texture is due to my… Read more »
Fran Davis
Guest
“I actually have an African friend who told me that she liked my hair and that she is going to marry a white guy so her kids won’t have her’nappy 4c hair’. Made me want to cry.” I had a neighbor who was African-American, dark-skin, and nappy hair. He married a German woman with platinum blond hair. They had 3 sons and you can’t tell by looking at the sons that they have a white mother as they have none of her features or skin color. They have African features like their dad who obviously have some strong genes. My… Read more »
Delia
Guest

Amen. Don’t tell me I have the good kind of hair that can go natural, all hair is good hair when you treat it right and don’t abuse it..

maralondon
Guest
In my experience it was always men and women of European descent who weren’t considered exotic and unique. These people have been fascinated by our skin colour and physical features, not to mention our cultures, from time. It does annoy me when you have black people asking the mixed question to one another. It shows pure ignorance of self. I never like to assume that someone is other than black based on the look of their hair or their skin tone, it doesn’t even enter my head to ask the question. Also assuming that someone is from some Caribbean Island… Read more »
silkynaps
Guest
There are three races. Each race has characteristics that are specific to it. Eff what you heard, but the fact is that the Negroid race is genetically predisposed to have dark skin and tightly coiled hair. That is what has protected Africans from the African climate for perhaps as long as life has existed. If those features are not a part of your aesthetic, you are Caucasoid, Mongoloid, or some type of hybrid. Maybe not first generation. Maybe not even second generation. But someone along the line, the DNA of another race was introduced into your DNA. For those that… Read more »
Queen
Guest

I seriously LMAO at most of these pathetic responses SMFH! These “new blacks” are something else, ” whatever do you mean by black traits” my cousin’s boyfriend 2nd niece is mixed and she’s not only darker than me but her hair is 4G.

anon
Guest
Race as we know it, is a social construct. In our color conscious society, “mixed blacks/ fair blacks” and “non-mixed blacks/ darker blacks” are perceived quite differently. Relative to fairer skinned blacks, darker skinned blacks occupy a different space w/in the social strata, and are therefore racially distinct. With all due respect, this mythology that all blacks face the same the same degree of racism irrespective of color and degree of conformity to eurocentric phenotype is beyond unproductive… it only serves to silence legitimate and honest discussions about colorism so that beneficiaries of colorism feel more comfortable about their privilege.… Read more »
silkynaps
Guest
I think we, as a race, project our insecurities about specific hues onto other races and ethnicities. I know we’d love to simplify the complexities of racism and blame it on one or more of the 32 shades of Black skin, but truth be told, complexion has nothing to do with it. If the whole “light skin is more favorable to white folks” thing was true, there wouldn’t be a one drop rule. “One drop” means, white folk don’t care how light or dark you are. Black is Black. Unless a light-skinned Black can actually pass for white, his complexion… Read more »
anon
Guest

The one drop rule has much less significance in the absence of an overt, legally-sanctioned, race-based caste system… Colorism manifests itself in so many social spaces… globally. I find it odd that you seem to be denying it’s existence– or worse implying that only blacks perpetuate it. Last time I checked blacks did not own a controlling share in our mass media (to which you need look no further for daily reminders of color bias). Just sayin…

anon
Guest

*its existence

silkynaps
Guest
I reiterate: “I won’t say there is no favoritism shown towards Blacks solely because of a fair complexion, but I definitely do not believe that is the rule. I do, however, believe that favoritism based on complexion is more likely to happen within our race as opposed to from outside.” As a matter of fact, whites definitely preferred fair skinned slaves when it was time for raping. Another fact: My mother’s country employed systematic miscegenation specifically to lighten the Black race, but I don’t think they understood how genetics work. They didn’t lighten the Black race, they darkened their own.… Read more »
Angela
Guest

It is true that black people have internalized white racism. But I have sat with a lot of white people. Some people see the beauty of dark skin but will not cast it in a movie. And black people see that and want to feel better so we “self select” in order to fit into the white racial hierarchy. Do you understand? Of course we have internalized racism- we are trying to survive insanity.

AC
Guest
You have no idea what you’re talking about, light skin privilege like a mofo. You also don’t know anything about American Chattel Slavery’s history, i’mma drop these hints for you: The first free Blacks to vote, own property, and hold public office were light skin biracial Black people just like our president. If you think for a second that the hypervisibility of Denzel and Idris at this moment erases the history of our power structure you are sadly mistaken. You are also mistaken if you think our country would have ever elected President Obama if he looked like Wesley Snipes.… Read more »
silkynaps
Guest
First off, there are 32 shades of Black skin. Maybe we need to first define what is dark…because I consider Denzel to be, at least, #25. Is brown not dark? I think brown is dark and you have yet to name a light skinned actor who is more popular than him. Second off, fuck Zoe because she only claims to be Black when it’s convenient. That and I don’t really consider her to be light. Otherwise, everything else you say only further supports my point. These unnamed singers and actors of which you speak…white people ain’t checking for them until… Read more »
Angela
Guest
Um…I lived in Hollywood and was a working actress for nine years and still do film and television. My agent said, and I quote “The casting agents want mulatto girls.” I have biracial soul mates and family members My mom has light skinned privilege. Such as it is. But does it mean she did not suffer more than I? No. Being a lights kinned black woman in 1950 sucks more than being a brown skinned (me) black woman today. However, she still has certain privileges and has told me “I think I was skipped a grade because of my skin… Read more »
AC
Guest
No Denzel is not dark, he is brown which is in the middle of light and dark… dark people are victims of colorism idk why you don’t understand that. Please stop denying our collective reality, and you have yet to name dark actresses that are more popular with more work than the lighter ones. This Idris thing is also brand new, Idris was not as popular back when he was on The Wire. Denzel Washington is probably hands down the most famous but he is not dark, neither is Will Smith, Laurence Fishburne, Terrence Howard, etc. Although some dark actors… Read more »
silkynaps
Guest
Oprah, Angela Bassett, Whoopi, Rutina, Halle, Morris, Wesley, Denzel, Idris, Samuel. None of whom would pass a paper bag test. You want to talk history…how about light skinned Blacks being lynched for trying to pass as white? Light skin is prevalent in this country because of ancestral rape. Where’s the privilege in that? If there are 32 shades of Black skin, how is #25 in the middle? What type of math is that? Since when is brown not dark enough? Denzel wouldn’t pass the paper bag test. Historically, the paper bag test was created and used by BLACK sororities and… Read more »
silkynaps
Guest

And by the way, my argument was not that colorism didn’t occur. I agree that it does occur…I just believe that it’s mostly like to occur within the race.

Black men that only date light-to-white women…

Mothers who tell their daughters not to stay out in the sun too long so they won’t get dark…

Paper bag tests…

In India, matrimonials are used specifically to find light skinned Indian spouses…

Asians (and others) bleach their skin to appeal to affluent members of their own community not white people…

Majesty
Guest
You are fucking ridiculous, there is nooo way I’m mixed with anything. I’m am 100% West African, Nigerian to be exact, I still have my traditional last name and I’m as dark as nobody’s business and I have 3c/4a hair. Infact a lot of people on my dad’s side have really curly hair, although most of my sisters have kinky hair, me and my dad are the same too, he’s also very dark. I don’t have slave ancestors either. [img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/image-30.jpg[/img] [img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/image-31.jpg[/img] It’s not a humble brag, because I’m a proper African and I don’t give a fuck about being a… Read more »
silkynaps
Guest
What about your father’s father? What about his father? What about his father? The fact that you only speak on one generation only reinforces my statement that many people of African descent have lost their history due to ignorance, slavery, colonization, and/or war. Nigeria has seen its share of war, was colonized by white folks, and definitely engaged in the slave trade until white folks made it illegal. Did you know that when GB outlawed slavery, they dropped a bunch of freed slaves off in Nigeria? I won’t even mention that half the country is Christian because of white folks… Read more »
Michelle
Guest

You are absolutely wrong. There is no such thing as ‘race’. Also, East Africans PHENOTYPE (look the word up) is one of their own, and not due to ‘race-mixing’.

silkynaps
Guest

Girl, bye.

HCHOC
Guest

If your ancestors were slaves more than likely you’re of mixed heritage. Even if your parents are both AA. A lot of AAs have that mixed look. Compare yourself to full Africans and you’ll understand it. I’m AA and have a few African sister friends, to them I’m mixed and so is my hair. I was offended at first but now I get it! Seriously though, you wrote an article about this? Pure silliness!

Mina
Guest
At the risk of getting 14 thumbs down like you did- I totally agree. Lol If you compare American blacks who often have a very mixed background to Africans, you will notice some obvious differences. My Liberian best friend in college looks nothing like my girlfriend from Somalia but they are both natives of Africa. Compare either of them to your Average Black female and you clearly see the differences having NOTHING to do with their hair type. Their hair is permed. I think people waste their time being offended by things that do not matter. I have 4C natural… Read more »
christelle
Guest

After reading this, I had flashbacks to when people assumed I was hispanic when I was relaxed . Once I told them i was Haitian, they couldnt believe it nor did they want to accept it. It was annoying at first because some would question my ethnic background while making comments as if a Haitian person or black woman couldn’t have long hair. Fortunately, now that I’m embracing my natural coils since 2012, there haven’t been any doubts or questions about my ethnicity

Kashmere
Guest

I get the opposite. I’ve had people insist that I must be black, because my hair is too big and afro-like to be mixed and apparently I’m too dark to be mixed. It’s just ignorance. People need to broaden their knowledge before they go commenting on things they clearly know nothing about.

Adía
Guest

Everyone knows black people come in all different shades and hair textures so I don’t understand why people are surprised when someone tells them they aren’t mixed. I can understand the question but not the shock

A. Miller
Guest

It’s nice to know that I’m not the only one that feels put off by being asked if they are mixed because of the texture of their hair.

cassandra
Guest
Honestly, some of you african americans are in serious denial. Being mixed does not necessarily mean having a non black parent. You are mixed if one or more of your ancestors was non black. And rape during slavery and inter-marraige changed the hair textures of african slaves brought to the americas.Besides the fulanis, the somalis, sudanese, ethiopians and north africans in general(who have arab blood due to trade with arabs/ slavery and rape by arabs/ intermarriage), africans have kinkier hair textures. And this is not a bad thing. Kinky unmixed african hair is just as gorgoeus as any other texture
growing it alone
Guest
There are sub Saharan Africans with straighter hair… like the Khoisan people in South Africa, who look a bit Asian, Aborigines have European hair in texture and some in colour too, they are not mixed and have there own mutation of the blond gene. There is not just one type of white person with one type of hair… (the racist stereotype of limp thin and greasy springs to mind…) so why do people think there is just one type of black person? Most of the human race has mixed blood lines in this day and age. But that doesn’t mean… Read more »
Terina Nicole
Guest

Welcome to MY life. I am asked if I’m mixed or Hispanic on a regular basis by blacks, whites and Hispanics. I just say yes, I’m mixed with Black and mo’ Black. Lol

rachel
Guest

Being biracial I can understand what you are expressing ..when people realize that I am biracial the first thing they look at is my hair I don’t have the super loose free flowing curls that my other biracial sisters seem to have but my hair is special because it represents me

Smarty
Guest
I think that there’s SO many black women that DON’T “do” natural hair and don’t take care of their natural hair or don’t show it in its natural state that when u see some nice crushable unattainable (in ur mind) hair, u don’t instantly associate that with pure black women. (Don’t blame her, it has been thee culture, a culture that has many of us just realize that our hair isn’t “bad”. But braids, that’s mostly “us”. I wouldn’t necessarily be flattered but u know what she meant by it which solidifies that there a thought process behind what she… Read more »
Stace
Guest

You hit the nail right on the head! Thank you.

growing it alone
Guest
It’s good to be curious about people’s background and ask questions… but only when it’s relevant to a conversation… A sporadic outburst of “are you.….” or “where are you from” is just plain rude! Mind… I am British and we don’t use the “African” reference, all humans came out of Africa after all… (“ooo” controversial!) I have been queried on my race… mixed or black, I don’t particularly mind if the question arises in a relevant conversation. I think if more black people regardless of shade or texture chucked away there tacky wigs and weaves and showed off the variety… Read more »
MyTake305
Guest

Hmm, I would disagree. We shouldn’t be blamed for other people’s ignorance. I don’t accept that. To a lot of non-Black people, Black people are irrelevant. Do you know most white people in America don’t even have one Black friend!? I’m not going to go out of my way to educate someone who could not care less to educate themselves (And styling MY hair differently to achieve this is out of the question.) How about THEY seek out more diverse friends and acquaintances.

Iman
Guest

American and mixed girl problems. Smdh!

Olivia
Guest
As a biracial person (equally parts black and white), I can never know the feeling of when someone insists that you’re mixed because of your hair, because, well, I’m very obviously mixed. I do feel your frustration with ignorance, though. People make all sorts of assumptions about me, i.e. “You must be from Africa then, right?” I’m not from effing Africa. My black ancestors have been in this country for 400 years. If anyone is the “immigrant” here, it’s not me. I consider myself 75% American, because my white side is mostly British, not because I’m “some exotic immigrant from… Read more »
Erin
Guest
I’m biracial (I *can’t stand* the term mixed — I’m not cake batter!), and it’s so annoying when people feel the need to figure out what my ethnic background is. My race has been so closely scrutinized by non-Blacks — it’s annoying; as are the assumptions in the black community that I’m uppity or snobbish because I’m olive-skinned (I’m just shy!) What I think is funny is that my perceived race directly corresponds to my hair style: when I’m wearing an afro wig, I get, “Right on, sister” on the street. When my hair was copper-red and blown out (or… Read more »
Michelle
Guest

If you were a bit darker, with that same hair, no one would ask if you were mixed.

ChellybNatural
Guest

I don’t necessarily get the are you mixed question. More of the do your have Native American in your family. I also get the you have good hair comment from my co-workers so much that it becomes an insult. Not only do they start putting their selves down and comparing us, but they are also stating that I have to be something that I’m not just to have nice good looking hair.

cassi
Guest

In my experience, I went to work with a big 3b curly afro and a coworker asked me if t was my real hair? *sigh* When I said yes, she asked me if I was African. Also, pure African can have many different features. Diversity in looks doesn’t mean youre automatically mixed.

keepin tha peace
Guest

I did not like the article & have done my best not to go in. All I will say is all of you need to go to 23andme.com or ancestry.com and learn where you come from and embrace it.

If you are an African American woman you are mixed. Period. You are global. Period.

Just because certain phenotypes are expressed differently does not negate that fact.

veronica
Guest

I definitely understand where the original poster is saying and agree 100%.

BionicWoman
Guest

I get asked if I’m mixed as well, but not because of my hair, but because of my complexion, and I’m not the lightest Black person out there. I usually get it from other races, not African American. I get the “Oh you’re so beautiful! Are you mixed?” comment. Like a Black woman can’t be beautiful without being mixed. So ignorant! It’s very insulting.

BionicWoman
Guest
Coincidentally, I just had my DNA Ancestry tested by 23andMe this summer. It says that I have 24.3% European Ancestry and 74.5% Sub-Saharan African. The majority of African Americans know that they have some European Ancestry due to our history and slavery. I think the author of the article, is referring to when people assume that you must be mixed 1–2 generations back. Because of our history, we don’t get the luxury of saying what our entire ethnicity is made up of. Everyone just sees us as being of African descent period, thanks to the stupid one drop rule implemented… Read more »
Shak
Guest

When someone asked if you’re mixed they’re not asking of your ancestral makeup but rather are your parents both black. To them you cannot be this beautiful and have both African American parents. And it is an insult. Plus our kinks and curls don’t come from any other race. So if we do decide to investigate and find out we are 1% other more than likely our beautiful features did not derive from that 1% other.

Andrea
Guest

You don’t know what I mean when I ask so your wrong!

The Darling Kinkshamer
Guest
The Darling Kinkshamer

I wish that I had more upvotes for this comment.

Andrea
Guest

Thank you! But I did go in! Because you’re right, most of us ARE mixed! They need to own it, accept it, then let it go and stop biting people’s head’s off ’cause they got issues!

Erin
Guest
Though I can’t say I totally understand Portia’s situation, I can relate. I am of Scottish and French Canadian descent, but constantly asked if I’m mixed due to my complexion and hair. Now I don’t know what my great great great parents were, but as far as I know, I’m Caucasian. I’ve had people argue with me, “No no…there’s gotta be something…are you sure you’re just white?” I’ve even had people act upset because I’m “denying my heritage”. I too LOVE all the beauty made evident in every race, and every wonderful combination, I am just ready for people to… Read more »
Miss Lemonade
Guest

I am black and have distant celtic relatives. Scottish people have Moorish ancestry. I know quite a few Scots with brown skin who get called ethnic slurs reserved for Arabs. My brother in law is Scottish and he looks like a white version of my sister. His nose, jawline, forehead.

Anjie
Guest

I always get “But you’re not not full black…?? & My response we(Blacks who have a deep rooted famiy tree here in the US) are all mixed with something else.…!! I also point out that someone with darker skin or kinkier hair could have less black in them then myself! Genetics! Back to point, I am a Black Woman and I love my Hair! .…Love urs too Taren!!

Mixed girl
Guest

Conversely, because I am mixed it’s as if I am not accepted as a true natural… “Oh but that’s cuz you’re mixed. You have good hair”. That irritates me. How about we quit drawing lines and putting people in boxes?

Longpig
Guest
Agree! I am in fact mixed — my Dad is half-Indian and also of Syrian heritage. But for me, when people ask, I do tell them -yes I am- but it pisses me off to no ends — because I am black. Period. Any day of the week that is who I am — that’s how I look, that’s how I identify — my hair is the only outerward sign of an Indian heritage. I am black because that is what black people are — we may not be able to break down our heritage into specific percentages of countries… Read more »
BionicWoman
Guest

I get asked if I’m mixed as well, but not because of my hair, but because of my complexion, and I’m not the lightest Black person out there. I usually get it from other races, not African American. I get the “Oh you’re so beautiful! Are you mixed?” comment. Like a Black woman can’t be beautiful without being mixed. So ignorant! It’s very insulting.

Brown Girl
Guest

I’ve gotten..“you’re a pretty black girl”…like wow..ok

SantanaNyla
Guest

I used to gt confused and hurt when people would ask me what my ethnicity I was-but now I think that what they are seeing in me is a mix due to the fact that my mother is African American and my father can best be described as Other. So yeah, in that sense I’m ethnically mixed.

Ndandu
Guest

AMEN ! I’m mixed but I totally agree. I’m half Congolese and Belgian but people usually think i’m from Jamaica but not African and whenever I proudly say I’m half African they just look shocked. And when I get a little bit irritaed they say the same thing : I should be proud that I don’t look like a Congolese. Our African woman are beautiful and I’m proud to be part of this culture.

Andrea
Guest
Girl, half of America doesn’t even know where the Congo IS!!! Y’all need to stop with this presumed and assumed rational as to why people ask questions! It might be because of the tone in your skin, your accent, or, in my case, you have an accent of the natives of people where I was once stationed in the Army. But y’all are hung up on hair and all that other BS! That’s shit y’alk need to let go of. Maybe somebody is just trying to have a conversation — you know, like “so, where you from?” And y’all gotta… Read more »
Jos
Guest

I feel like saying you should be proud is different from asking if you’re mixed. That’s definitely an insult while if you’re mixed sounds towards curiousity

Cai B.
Guest

I have been hit with the “you must have Indian in your family” remark many times. Both of my parents are A.A. and I find it rude and presumptuous. I do not like people presuming that because I have something they admire, I must have some European ancestry. Not sure if I have more than a sprinkle of mixture in me somewhere along the line, but what difference does it make if I do? No one should give a shit.

Andrea
Guest

It’s just a question, not an insult. People interested in hair (like stylist) ask questions like these all the time, why be offended?! And don’t assume you know why people ask (that bullshit is in YOUR head)!

Angela
Guest
Thank you for this. That response was much more articulate and to the point and frankly less insulting than the poster’s article. ‘I do not like people presuming that because I have something they admire, I must have some European ancestry” I get this brief, pointed statement much more deeply than the assumption that the “something they admire” is actually “beautiful” and more beautiful than the rest of us brillo pads. Like I said, aint nothing wrong with a brillo pad, plus they clean things up. And I have gotten that And the fact that people are so willing to… Read more »
Christina
Guest
Maybe people assume you are mixed becaus efull blooded Africans are way darker. Most African Americans in contrast are mixed with whites, thus the lighter skin color. When will African Americans finally acknowledge that?! (PS: I‘m half white (German), half west African (Ghanaian) and I have seen many Africans who have the same complexion like me or even lighter and claim they are fully black- smh :-o… “According to noted educator Henry Louis Gates, there are no Black Americans with 100 percent African ancestry. “We have never tested an African-American who is 100 percent African,” Gates said, speaking at Grambling… Read more »
Christina
Guest

Sorry, I wanted to write: “I´ve seen many African Americans who have the same complexion…”

Dee Hines
Guest

If both your parents are african american, and so are their parents, you would not consider yourself mixed. Complexion has nothing to do with immediate ethnicity. Two white people can produce a black child and two black people can produce a white child, even if there hasn’t been any race mixing present in either family for multiple generations. It’s all about dominant genes. Oprah found out that she has all african heritage so that proves that wrong…

Brianna Nicolas
Guest

nope nope and nope

The Darling Kinkshamer
Guest
The Darling Kinkshamer

Yes, nope to your comment.

Complexion means nothing.

Angela
Guest

Yes, so the answer to that question should be “Mixed in what way? I identify as “African American”. Implicit in the American part of that terms is “potentially mixed with Europeans, First Nations and Asian, both Southeast and East Asian.” That’s what African American means to me. That I am mixed but the dominant genetic and cultural traits are from my African ancestors.

The Darling Kinkshamer
Guest
The Darling Kinkshamer

You are biracial, whereas I have two black parents. Please don’t make assumptions about all of us. African-Americans are very very diverse. I have a white great grand father, but we all look black and we are.

marie
Guest

i think it all comes down to ignorance and not realizing how different and unique black hair can be and how it texture varies from person to person. Basically, since you have ‘good hair’ they assume you are not fully black, so its basically ignorance- hair texture varies, its all beautiful . all hair is good hair

Andrea
Guest

Actually, it is the very opposite of ignorance. People are inquisitive because they are aware that with more mixed heritage comes , like you said, different, unique and various textures. If the writer were pure African all the back from DNA strand to DNA strand, she probably would be black’s darkest hue with the kinkiest, beady, coily hair. It is also not simply her hair they are taking into account but also her light skin tone. People need to just face facts — we blacks have been watered down. We are no longer pure, plain and simple.

marie
Guest

yh that’s actually true. even in Africa, a lot of us are not ‘pure’ there is some mix down the line from when the missionaries and slave traders came. Several people have foreign last names like ‘Hansen’, ‘Ribeiro’ , which are more spanish than african

Angela
Guest
So my question is, Are you taking the are you mixed question as an association with beauty? What the hell is wrong with a brillo pad texture of hair? That’s not beautiful either? Maybe you are the one reading and projecting a perjorative, value judgment into what people are asking? What the hell is a “beautiful head of hair”? So bottom line, the rest of us have ugly hair and yours is beautiful and people are incredulous at your beautiful, awesome superior head of hair? Do you see the value judgment implicit in this whole complaint. Yes, you probably are… Read more »
Maikem
Guest

You are absolutely getting what she said wrong, please read her article again. She is defending black women and the beauty they have.they don’t have to be mixed with white or other races to be called beautiful but are in their own Africaness And people should acknowledge that. It’s somehow an insult to us.

Angela
Guest
So I read this again and it was not as negative towards black as I immediately thought. I think it is a roundabout way of talking about the racial hierarchy and not seeing beauty in blackness. I hav e a white friend who is always telling me “you’re not that dark” Finally I told her that she was brainwashed by white supremacist thinking and that I did not take that shit as a compliment. The way she said it, it was a compliment. I explained that I get darker and richer and more beautiful in the summer and that I… Read more »
Coco
Guest
Well I get this often especially since I am a chocolate girl and always had long hair so I state the truth when asked and it usually shuts down the convo. According to my family tree and history one of my ancestors were raped by the plantation owner thus producing a son so I’m sure some genes were express due to that forced union. I share that to say this sometimes people seem to forget or like to sweep under the rug the ugly truth of how ones features came to be. When someone attempts to give me as the… Read more »
Saquoia Lewis
Guest

I have kinky hair and people assumed that I am mixed, or at least from another culture. I think most people are still not used to the idea of black women wearing their natural hair. I think most people perceive American women as having a stereotypical identity.

Mikky Lachae
Guest

When people ask if I’m mixed, I say yes because I am. Based on my genes and what the eyes see, I “look” mixed. Just not with white lol

more
Guest

I’m sorry but she is obviously mixed -_-

Chanel
Guest

Lol if that’s the case thennn were all mixed. But technically everyone is black and has African in them. Whether its a small percentage or full blown African. I’m not sure what makes her “look mixed” to you. But two light skin black parents, makes her black. Unless she wants to be like the majority of the world and identify with ancestry three hundred years ago.

The Darling Kinkshamer
Guest
The Darling Kinkshamer

No. My sister is lighter than me and she is as “black” as I am with type 3a hair, whereas both of our parents have kinkier hair. That’s a rude and inaccurate thing to say. Being light skinned does not make a person “obviously mixed”, unless a person with two black parents is somehow mixed now…?!

darklady
Guest
The world we live in is anti-black, anti -African, and anti-truth. Like Paul Mooney said “everybody talks shit when it comes to race, everybody wants to talk about their Irish or Swedish grandmother, everybody wants to diss Africans”. For many blacks your ignorance stemming from their manipulation of the images you see of Africa and the things you hear about it programs your mind to be ashamed of being African and to despise the fact that your ancestors were African. They say we are inferior we eventually start to believe the whether consciously or unconsciously. It’s funny when I hear… Read more »
tynamarie1
Guest

Preach!!!!

Chanel
Guest
I feel like black women don’t have to be mixed to be beautiful or have beautiful hair or light skin. We have so much different ancestry whether its acknowledged or not. The whites, Indians, and Africans actually lived together at different points in time. And that’s not including all of the slave trading between the French , English, and Dutch. And back then the Dutch were mostly Irish and Scottish. And all native Americans derive from Asia. Dumbass Columbus called them indies because its where he thought he was. Regardless, my point is there is so much history with Africans… Read more »
Brianna Nicolas
Guest

duh

Chanel
Guest

Lol.. I guess? Why cmmt at all. -_-

Maikem
Guest
Am so pleased with your answers to those ignorant people. I don’t see why you other women taking this the bad way. You should rather be applauding her for saying the truth and defending her race. I am an African and my mom brown and my dad also but am light skin and my sister is way lighter than I am. Don’t be confused about Africans having different shades of skin tones. Africans don’t have to have a pale skin person in their ancestry to have a light skin kid. I was in Jakarta Indonesia a few years ago, I… Read more »
CC
Guest
Irritated beyond all reason. I am not trying to toot my own horn or anything. But i have gotten you are so pretty you must be mixed! WHAT! Are you serious. I have mixed nieces and close friends and my fiance is white/korean. So if we have kids they will really be mixed, so i obvi have no problem with mixed race people. But to infer that there is no way a that a full black girl can be pretty. So so so irritating. Can i mention that if anything i look more native american (the nose) than anything, but… Read more »
idris
Guest

White guy: Oh you’re cute for a black girl . You have to be mixed, right?
Me: -_______-

The Darling Kinkshamer
Guest
The Darling Kinkshamer

Agreed, that’s racist. He’s saying that black girls aren’t cute?! WAT.

Heejay Cendrix ?
Guest

WAAAAAAAAAAT

aracial
Guest
“I’m not sure if I am 100% African” Biologically, you’re not. All American African-Americans are at least about 30% white. In Brazil it’s even higher, even in people who consider themselves to be purely black. In fact there’s a famous singer, “Neguinho da Beija-Flor”, an artistic name which would translate as “Little black guy of the Hummingbird [samba school]”, who was genetically tested and he’s 70% white. In fact black people from the US will sometimes report they were considered “white” in Africa, by Africans themselves. Sort of a reversed “one drop rule”. Now, “socially”, it’s up to you. If… Read more »
Brianna Nicolas
Guest

No they arent that is made up just like willie lynch. Every decade that number increases by ten. In the 90’s it was 20% now its 30? Lmao absolutly not. the majority of african americans are black.

Jerri
Guest

Im 86 % African. #winniing!!!!

TJ
Guest

I got comments like that from time to time. I got to a point where I’d say “Yes, I am mixed. My mom is Black and my dad is even Blacker!”

Cassie
Guest

MY daughter is her color with no white ancestry only asian chinese and its not impossible to be pure black and light look at the sans tribe and you dont know what he first people looked like they could have been high yellow. We will never know. but one thing I know is black people africans have the mosy diverse dna and even produce white looking people

Cassie
Guest

Everyone on earth except some black people are mixed and if you have kinky hair, you wouldnt get it from any other race but black.

Brianna Nicolas
Guest

;p

V-Yella Westcoast
Guest

Light skin blacks are mixed they just don’t know. Thats why people keep asking them if they are mixed. They should take a dna ancestry test because
so that they know about their mixed heritage. Technically the light skin blacks are mulattoes but the racist white supremacists changed the census in 1930 and clumped them together with the dark skin blacks. They did that because they didn’t want the light skin blacks to know their mixed ancestry.

Jos
Guest
I don’t think it should be taken as a compliment but I also don’t think it’s an insult. Sometimes it’s just curiosity and sometimes it’s not your hair but rather your complexion that leads to people asking if you’re mixed. And as one person stated, most light skinned blacks have another race somewhere in their family ancestry but may not know so it wouldn’t be completely accurate to say you’re not mixed. Most of us don’t know past our grandparents on each side. I once read this research that stated most African Americans living in the United States that were… Read more »
MyTake305
Guest
Aww man, this article is 2 years old? Well, I’m leaving my comment anyway. 🙂 I feel EXACTLY like the author does!! My hair curls into tight spirals, and when I put gel on it, it’s shiny and defined. My hair isn’t the only reason people often demand to know what I’m “mixed with,” but it’s one of the reasons, and it’s the topic of this article, so I’ll focus on that. It bothers me because of two reasons: 1) the extreme ignorance about African American people. I feel I represent the typical African American. The typical AA is not… Read more »
Gabby Mills
Guest
Hello all! (my first post) I often get asked if I am Dominican or Puertorican and rarely do non blacks correctly identify my race, I have light eyes and medium length hair. I once went to school with my hair straightened (my hair is to my under arms) and someone asked me If I was mixed, I told her I was mostly black and when she didn’t believe me i told her the truth and mentioned that I’m also a small portion of native american. (my great great grandmother was native and black) she replied by saying “It worked”. It… Read more »

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