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How To Make Natural Hair Styling Products More Moisturizing

• Jun 29, 2014

by Portia of huneybflyy.com

styler and butter

We all love a good hair styling product that keeps our twist outs or wash n go’s in place. However, some of the products designed to hold your kinks and curls, can also dry them out at the same time. What do you do when you love the definition that a product gives, but you don’t love how dull and dry your hair looks? It’s simple, just add moisture!

Did you think you had to give up and throw away that $15 jar of styling gel? Well, you don’t.  There are several moisturizing oils and butters that you can mix in with your favorite styler or you can apply them to your hair before you apply the styler. It’s important to keep your hair moisturized in general, but it’s even more important to do so when you are dealing with a product that seems to dry it out. Take a look at the list below and see which oils and butters can keep your hair full of moisture and save you money!

The Butters

mango-butter

Avocado Butter

This butter is one of the natural hair community’s best kept secrets. Not only is it a great alternative to its sister, shea butter, but it also packs on the moisture.  It’s a heavy butter that will add shine and softness to your hair. This is great for sealing in moisture after your hair has been washed. Avocado butter mixes great with just about any hair styler. This butter is especially recommended for those with dry hair.

Mango Butter 

Mango butter is almost like cocoa butter in consistency. It is extremely moisturizing and has more fatty acids than shea butter (linoleic acid to be exact). This means it penetrates your hair better, smooths the hair and softens. Because mango butter has an incredible amount of linoleic acid, it’s a super moisturizer!

Murumuru Butter 

The name may be hard to pronounce, but that shouldn’t detract you from the benefits of this butter. Murumuru butter is a Brazilian tree butter. Like mango butter, it’s an emollient and provides moisture retention. It prevents moisture loss when applied directly to the hair after washing and conditioning. It helps make the hair soft and pliable.

Cupuacu Butter 

Cupuacu butter is considered to be a hydrophilic butter. It loves water, so if you put it on your hair after your wash and condition…MOISTURE GALORE! It also prevents moisture from leaving your head.

 

The Oils

Oils-Bottles

Olive Oil 

Tried and true, olive oil will forever be a staple in the natural hair community. It saturates each strand of hair with moisture and softens along the way. Because olive oil is an emollient, it penetrates the hair better than most oils.

Red Palm Oil 

Red palm oil is always overlooked, primarily because people just don’t know much about it. This oil is perfect for moisturizing hair. It’s filled with saturated fats and lipids, which are essential for keeping hair moisturized.

Grape Seed Oil 

This oil helps keep your hair’s natural moisture locked into your strands.  It also gives hair a nice sheen as well as aides in sealing the hair. Sealing is essential for retaining moisture.

Jojoba Oil 

Not only does jojoba oil strengthen your hair, but it’s similar to sebum, which is the oil that we naturally produce on our scalp. Once applied, it produces a thin layer over the hair shaft that prevents moisture from escaping.  Jojoba oil is an excellent sealer.

Apricot Oil 

Apricot oil isn’t talked about very much. Most people use it for their skin since it seeps effortlessly into it and keeps it moisturized. However, apricot oil is a great moisturizer for your hair as well. It doesn’t leave your hair feeling greasy and is rich in essential fatty acids.

As with any oil, it’s best to use a brand that offers the oil in its purest form. You’ll receive the most benefits from the oil if it’s pure. Remember, the key to success when using these butters and oils is proper application. Use the oils to seal in moisture (water or leave in conditioner) after washing your hair. If you feel that your hair isn’t moisturized enough, feel free to add a butter to your hair. You can also seal your hair with a sealing oil and mix a butter with your favorite styler or vice versa. It all depends on what your hair likes.

Do you currently use any of the above oils and butters in your regimen? How do they stack up?

Portia is a wife and mother who enjoys making things and people look pretty! As a graduate of Rowan University, Portia has an insatiable craving for natural hair, beauty, and fashion, but she also enjoys traveling and home decor. If you’d like to know more about her, visit her blog at huneybflyy.com

About Editorial

BGLH now sells raw and whipped shea butter, cocoa butter and mango butter. Purchase here: bglh-marketplace.com

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Dawn
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Dawn

I’ve only used shae butter, olive oil, and coconut oil. I’ve been wanting to swich to mango butter. Now, I want to try avocado butter and murumuru butter, but you have also made me look at a new skin regimen. My son have servere eczema, we want to get him off of the petroleum jelly.

Diane
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Diane

I whip a cup of shea butter, 4 tablespoon coconut oil, 1 tablespoon castor oil and 1 half cup 100% pure aloe vera gel, also add and essentail oil for scent

Mary
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Mary

So these actually moisturize and not just seal in moisture? I keep reading that oils and butters don’t add moisture.

db
Guest
db

Some people use the word hydrate to describe the adding of water to the hair, and when they say moisturize they’re referring to the process of hydrating/adding moisture and doing something to help keep the water in longer, like adding a sealant, which is something to coat to hair. There are some oils that can penetrate. It is confusing, though, people don’t all use the same terminology. Most moisturizers/leave‐ins have water and things to coat the hair in it.

db
Guest
db

I use shea butter as a sealant, hut it also works pretty well as a styler. I usually add things like oils to my conditioner, there was an oil mix I got as a free sample and it always made my hair really moisturized, soft, and shiny when I added it.

Mary in Md
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Mary in Md

Right now I am wearing the juicest, most moisturized extended wash and go ever!! I know folks are supposed to rewet to keep down the product build up. But, I have been taking my aloe vera, water, vegetable glycerin mix (I don’t measure. Sorry) and dampening my hair most mornings. Then, I add oil, shea butter mix, activator gel and styling gel (using Olive Oil Ecostyler, but I think anything you like that provides hold will work). I leave the house with damp hair. But when it dries, I just love it!!! I know it is time to wash my… Read more »

lexibugg
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lexibugg

Why oh why are you guys sleeping o. Design essentials defining creme gel.…it is a creamy styler with the hold of a gel without drying out your hair…it’s upward of 10$ but my jars last nearly a year and I am heavy handed though a lil goes a long way…it leaves my hair defined moist soft and bouncy and clumped. It works well with 90% of leave ins that I have used…and is great with their daily moisturizing lotion underneath.…not a plug (lol) just wonder why I don’t hear about more curries using these products

Dananana
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Dananana

Lol, curries. Darn autocorrect!:P But now, I’m totally intrigued about DE products. Incoming PJ flare up!

Jo
Guest
Jo

I don’t believe Palm Oil is eco‐friendly. There is much controversy surrounding the deforestation and harm to endangered species.

I have recently discovered that grapeseed oil is a great light detangling oil, more so than olive oil, although it is not absorbed as well as olive or coconut oil. It’s also around $3 at my local store so… Yay! 🙂

Lydia
Guest
Lydia

That’s the Asian red palm oil. I use the West African palm oil.

Dananana
Guest
Dananana

Red palm oil made my fine, slightly protein‐sensitive kinky coils brittle and dry when I used it as a prepoo–I’d be afraid to leave it in without washing it out. Plus, it stains everything. When I used it in my hair, it looked like I threw a bottle of turmeric all over my bathroom (I’m messy lol). Like Jo said, most brands are not eco‐friendly as well…look for ones that are part of rainforest cooperatives. I like Nutiva, but I’ll be honest and say I haven’t researched it well. Conclusion: keep palm oil for alapa, not your hair.

Tisha
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Tisha

Long, long ago ( say 9 years I’m dramatic 🙂 I used to use just styling products; Result Dry unhappy hair that frizzed in 2 days leaving me 🙁 So I tried using moisturizing products such as butters & oils to style my hair; Result Softer hair but with no definition that frizzed in 2 days leaving me 🙁 Finally a thought occurred to me Combination Therapy!!! So I always layer one moisturizing product then one styling product over & over like a cake. Sadly no matter How moisturizing the styling product it’s a no‐go on my hair without a… Read more »

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Guest

I am really grateful to you for this great content.I love all the natural recipes.I got a lot of inspiration from your tips. I use shea sample butter as a sealant, hut it also works pretty well as a styler.

Toya Grant
Guest
Toya Grant

can Castor oil be used as well? giving how thick it is

masonjar
Guest
masonjar

I mix castor oil with, coconut oil, Vick’s sap, Tea Tree oil or Eucalyptus oil. Castor oil and Vick’s equal in measurement. About a quarter more of coconut oil. A few drops of Tea Tree or Eucalyptus.

Star-Baby
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Star-Baby

Can I mix a butter with a sealing oil ( in a whip) and use it on wet hair for great results? or Do I have to layer products?

Star-Baby
Guest
Star-Baby

Are their any natural all in one recipes. something that works as a sealent, moisturizer and styler?

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