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How I Taught My Daughter To Care For Her Natural Hair From Birth

• Apr 30, 2014

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by Shaunic of Brown Girls Hair



Every little girl loves to play in Mommy’s clothes, shoes and jewelry. She loves to watch Mom put on her make up and comb her hair. She’s looking at you and dreaming of the day when she will be able to do it too!

We all know that our children learn best by watching what we do, not what we say. The first step to teaching your daughter how to care for her hair is to establish good hair habits with your hair first. She’s always watching you, even when you aren’t paying attention.

1. Start early teaching her what to do at bath and bed time.

I started teaching my daughter to wear a shower cap at bath time at the age of 4. This is a great age because you don’t have to worry too much about her putting it in her mouth and choking on it. You still have to keep an eye on her because it is plastic and she is in a tub of water. Parental supervision is always needed when plastic and water is involved.

Once she gets out of the tub, switch from a shower cap immediately to a satin bonnet. After she does it consistently for a while, it will become second‐nature!

Just like you create a routine for your hair, create one for your daughter too. Not just the one that you do on her hair, but also take the time to create a simple one for her to do as well.

2. As early as 5 or 6, you can start teaching her to moisturize her hair depending on the thickness and/length of her hair.

A child with long and thick hair may have more of a challenge with this task. So you may need to wait until your child becomes a little older and more patient. Always start by keeping the process easy and fun! If she doesn’t think it’s a fun tasks to do, wait until she does!

You can start with a simple method like putting her hair in 4 sections, then show her how to put the moisturizer in the palm of her hand, rub it in her hands, then apply it to her hair from root to end one section at a time.

Give her one very small portion of a section to start with. As she grows more comfortable over time, add more to her section. Keep increasing her portion (as time goes). For example, this week she does one small section and next week add a little more to her section etc.

3. Let her help wash and detangle her hair on wash day.

All kids love to play in bubbles! On wash day, you can give her a small section of her hair (in the front so that she can see in the mirror) to help wash and detangle. This is a great way to teach her the basics of how to do it. As she grows older, you can add more hair for her to do. Eventually, she’ll be able to do her whole head!

The timeline of when you start to teach your daughter is at your discretion because you know your child better than anyone else. Just know that you are always teaching her by what you do, so make your hair habits are good ones and she will follow!

Brown Girls Hair is a mother/daughter team that love to share our natural hairstyles with others. We aim to inspire, encourage, and uplift others through their natural hair journey. Follow them on Youtube BrownGirlsHair or tag them on Instagram @browngirlshair

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Primmest Plum
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Primmest Plum

I didn’t read the article yet but I had to comment first! I LIVE for that chunkilicious, ball of adorableness that is that baby picture… Okay. I’m going to read the article now.

Redseouls
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Redseouls

Such good tips!! I’ll pass them on since I don’t have a girl.

Primmest Plum
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Primmest Plum

This article is so wonderful. Instilling a solid hair routine along with positive reinforcement will set our daughters up for a massive head start in the self esteem department.

It starts in the home. I have coily‐kinky type 4a‐c hair and I honestly, didn’t hear any of this “good hair‐bad hair” nonsense unless it was from people outside of my home. I’ve always had lots of hair and I’ve always thought if you had lots of hair that was good lol. At least that’s what my mom instilled in me.

Ugonna Wosu
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Ugonna Wosu

she’s so beautiful, I could cry. If I had a daughter like that, I’d stare at her face all day. And oh, her hair is gorgeous too! You definitely did a great job.

Puff Puff Poof
Guest

These were great tips! I especially loved it when you talked about keeping it fun which is so important because hair time can be such an amazing time to bond if it’s fun for parents and kids. Also, helping kids learn about taking care of their hair can build their confidence about their appearance. Good stuff!

Shannon B
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Shannon B

I have two beautiful daughters that are natural, like their mommy 🙂 and they get numerous compliments about the thickness and healthiness, but it still doesn’t outweigh the number of comments about how their hair should be relaxed or at least “texturized”. It’s a shame really. But with the new wave of books like “I like myself”, role models like Lupita (and mommy), and continuous positive reinforcement, little “natural” girls will blossom like the women in this website and others like it.

Puff Puff Poof
Guest

It’s really inspiring that their is a growing generation of mothers (some of us who had to battle hair judgements from our own families) that will support and nurture their children’s self esteem. I’m sure you’re doing an amazing job with your daughters and how thrilling will it be when they get to teach the lessons you taught them to their little girls!!

Deb
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Deb

Internalized racism runs so deep in our people all around the world. It’s just really hard to think about when you realize the true depth of it.

NaturalV
Guest

I love this post so much and your daughter is so adorable.Instilling such good values and hair practices at a young age would go a long way in building self esteem and also bring about love and appreciation for their hair.

Jacky
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Jacky

Great article! I love that she taught her daughter to care for her natural hair since she was a baby( That girl might become an expert on natural hair care before she even becomes a teenager! ). I try to teach my little sisters to love and care for their natural hair too. I even made two books for them: Kinky gal, know how and Curly gal know how which are full of tips, hairstyles, hair care and praises for natural hair and they love them ( One of them has type 4b hair and the other has 3c hair… Read more »

dysia
Guest
dysia

Hi. I am asking for a bit of advice. My daughter is mixed race so for me this type of hair is a bit of challenge at times (i have long strait blond hair). She cries every time i am doing her hair in a bath i am using mixed chick conditioner to help detangle but she still cries. She is 5yrs. Any advice on how to do it. I use as well wide tooth comb.

Puff Puff Poof
Guest

Sounds like you need to make it a fun time and also improve on being gentle. Maybe ditch the comb and only finger tangle. Start twisting her hair before she goes to bed so it wont tangle in her sleep. Virgin, unrefined coconut oil has amazing slip just be sure to apply it after you’ve dampened her hair with water. I have tips on making it fun here https://puffpuffpoof.wordpress.com/2014/04/28/tips-making-hair-time-fun-time/ Be sure to talk to her about how you want hair time to be better and that she can help by telling you what she likes and doesn’t. be open and… Read more »

Tabatha
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Tabatha

This was cool to read. Its important for kids in general to know how to do their own hair. My mother taught me how to wash and dry and stuff, but when it came down to styling and maintaining I wasn’t taught, so I would mess up my hair, BUT it wasn’t my fault because I wasn’t taught what was good when it came to maintenance and styling. My mom was going to school part‐time, but working full time so she left it o my sister who knew how to do styles to do my hair (my sister was 3… Read more »

Natural Hair Kids
Guest

I totally agree with this article. I think satin bonnets and pillowcases are a MUST for over night protection. This step is often overlooked but very crucial to the health of natural hair!

Read more at: http://www.naturalhairshop.com
Purchase satin bonnets and pillowcases at http://www.naturalhairshop.com

Reanna
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Reanna

I always wondered if I ever had a daughter how I’d teach her to care for her hair so I’m grateful this article was posted. Thanks for sharing!

Allison
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Allison

My mom did the same with me. She did the big chop right after I was born. She wanted to make sure I grew up knowing that there was nothing wrong with the way my hair grew out of my head. She taught me how to wash and style my hair from a very young age, same with my sister. I’m 20 and there are so many girls my age that don’t know how to take care of their hair. I’m lucky my mom started early.

Bre
Guest

My daughter is 3 and her hair is thick and curly. Mine is thick, relaxed, and cut very short so the sorld of natural hair care is very new to me. I section it and moistuize, twist it or do bantu knots at night. I do need to go find her a bonnet, but i didnt think to have her help me. Mostly i just make her sit still and not move around lol. Good tips!

Shariyah
Guest
Shariyah

She is beautiful and her hair is beautiful!!! 🙂

Najja Tyson
Guest
Najja Tyson

You have a beautiful daughter with a beautiful head of hair.And great tips.

Shaunic
Guest

Thanks so much to all of you for your kind remarks. We aim to inspire and encourage Moms and Daughter’s to have fun exploring your natural hair. Hairstyles should be fun and should express your personality and style! xoxo

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