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H&M Uses Kinky Haired Kids in Its Back-to-School Catalogue

Avatar • Aug 25, 2013

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A photo of natural kids from H&M’s back-to-school catalogue has been circulating online, and all four have tightly curly/coily hair texture! When natural hair makes it to the mainstream it’s often of a looser texture, so it’s a bit of a surprise and quite refreshing to see that H&M went with kinky and coily-haired kids. And these kids are all ridiculously cute!

Ladies, what are your thoughts?

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loverlyone
loverlyone
7 years ago

I think it’s great! The kids are beautiful.

Alisa
Alisa
7 years ago

I love it!

Michele
7 years ago

About time ! The children are very cute . I shop a lot in this store and would love to see more black children modelling .

Barbara
Barbara
7 years ago

When we embrace our beauty others see that. That little red head has my uterus doing the pepper seed!

Jj
Jj
7 years ago

Beautiful kids!!!

Coconut + Cream
7 years ago

This is so adorable!

Naturally Luvly
7 years ago

I love it

Guest1234
Guest1234
7 years ago

Awwwww! Them some beautiful babies!

Miss Elisa K.
7 years ago

The Babies!!!!!!! So precious.

Natasha
Natasha
7 years ago

I don’t just love this because the children have kinky hair. The photos genuinely look great. Well done H&M.

TINA SMITH
TINA SMITH
7 years ago

BEAUTIFUL

D.K.
7 years ago

Little darlings; and about time that fashion got on the up and up. The kids are gorgeous, the photos well shot, and nothing racially charged about them. That’s what’s up!

vertmoot.blogspot.com

Heidi
Heidi
7 years ago

Cute cute cute!

Rain
Rain
7 years ago

That girl at the top left corner… her hair tho! *Homer drool…*
Luv these pics…kudos to H&M, I’ve got a feeling that tightly coiled hair and modern fros is about to hit mainstream big time!

Caramelcurls
Caramelcurls
7 years ago

LOVE, love, LOVE! I think this is great—these kids are posing with the hair they were born with. Well done H&M!

Amma Mama
Amma Mama
7 years ago

I love their kinks. They’re ADORABLE!

K
K
7 years ago

Gorgeous! Love the editing.

mimi
mimi
7 years ago

I’ll keep saying it.. when we love and accept our natural selves the world will accept our natural selves too. It starts with US naturals!! These photos make me very happy!

Dananana
Dananana
7 years ago

To echo everyone else, these photos make me happy, and all four of those kids are beyond adorable. One issue I noticed though–where’s the dark skin? I see 4 adorable faces, but not one of them is a shade beyond milk chocolate. I think H&M is taking a step in the right direction, but until I start seeing cocoa-skinned little Black children in back-to-school catalogues, my joy over this is a bit subdued.

HeavnsGirl
HeavnsGirl
7 years ago
Reply to  Dananana

Dananana got a number of thumbs-down, but I wondered the same thing. Can we see some little chocolate churren with naturally kinky hair??

Dananana
Dananana
7 years ago
Reply to  HeavnsGirl

Yeah, I’m not sure why I got so many thumbs down–I was only trying to begin a respectful and/or intellectual dialogue on colorism within the Black community and modeling profession. Leila asked what we thought, and that’s something that bothered me about this photo. Apparently you and I are the only ones who noticed.…

TINA SMITH
TINA SMITH
7 years ago
Reply to  Dananana

LET’S BE BLUNT I DON’T SEE ANY KIDS THAT ARE CHOCOLATE LIKE TYRESE, MORRIS CHESTNUT DARK YEA I WENT THERE CAUSE IT’S TRUE. AND IS A GORGEOUS COLOR

HeavnsGirl
HeavnsGirl
7 years ago
Reply to  TINA SMITH

Thank you, Tina. I don’t understand why people are deliberately being obtuse about what is meant by “dark-skinned.” How about some curly/kinky/nappy-haired little cuties in the mahogany brown to blue-black range? I have a family full of them if they need some. It makes me sad that sometimes we as black folks are so happy to see ANY representation of ourselves in the media that we cheer at every little thing and are afraid to ask for more. Yes these children are beautiful and I love that their hair is being celebrated, but this hair thing goes right in line with… Read more »

Rain
Rain
7 years ago
Reply to  TINA SMITH

@ HeavnsGirl You can celebrate progress, this is progress and thats something, as it opens the door for more progress to be made They don’t have to feature minorities at all and some companies never will. It might not be where it needs to be but at least change is happening and thats something that shouldn’t be ignored. There was a time this would never have happened so yes it should be celebrated, but that doesn’t undermine where the end goal is. You can cheer a baby starting its first steps before you cheer it walking. Change and progress is… Read more »

Rain
Rain
7 years ago
Reply to  Dananana

So if your milk chocolate you’re not considered dark skin?

Rain
Rain
7 years ago
Reply to  Rain

*So if you’re milk chocolate you not considered dark skin?

HeavnsGirl
HeavnsGirl
7 years ago
Reply to  Rain

Rain -

If “milk” and “dark” chocolate were the same color, one would not be called “dark.”

In a world where colorism reigns supreme, it would be great to see some black-black children with their naturally nappy hair in these photos.

Better?

Tracy
Tracy
7 years ago
Reply to  HeavnsGirl

I think it depends on the person and their background…

Meaning I’ve called people dark skinned or brown skinned and people would say no they’re not…

Or I call myself brown skinned and people have told me no you’re light skinned. I gave up on trying to classify folks because everyone isn’t going to agree. Nonetheless I think there is beauty in EVERY shade!

cacey
cacey
7 years ago
Reply to  HeavnsGirl

agreeing with tracy here. i’ve considered myself fairly dark most of my life- actually i never thought about it until college when my roommate called me “light-skinned.” it had never occurred to me that i was, before, because my aunt had a light beige complexion and turned a golden honey when suntanned- in winter her skin was what my family called “fair” and she’s one of the few black women i’ve ever known who actually bought skin bronzer/tanner, which i’d thought only white women used. so…compared to her, i WAS dark skinned, but to my very dark skinned roommate, whose skin… Read more »

Rain
Rain
7 years ago
Reply to  HeavnsGirl

I understand where you are coming from with the desire of more diverse range of darker skin tones but like I said in the other comment, I observed ‘milk’ chocolate as a various tone in the dark skin category just like there can be differences in someone who is dark brown/dark chocolate compared to someone who has a blue-black skin tone does not take away from them being considered dark, in my opinion they all come under the same umbrella as dark skinned so I was slightly confused. If you put milk chocolate against caramel there would be nothing “milky”… Read more »

Dananana
Dananana
7 years ago
Reply to  Rain

I wasn’t talking about the definition of light vs. dark, Rain…I was talking about how none of the kids are past medium brown (or milk chocolate) on the flesh color spectrum. If you’d like to consider that tone dark-skinned, that’s your prerogative-light/dark classifications are highly subjective and regionally based anyway. All I know is that I am the same color as those kids, and I’m tired of only seeing my skin tone or lighter in most magazines, when I grew up with beautiful cousins born with a variety of skin shades darker than mine.

Rain
Rain
7 years ago
Reply to  Dananana

I understand what you are saying with the need of a more diverse range of skin tones in the media, but I have always observed ‘milk’ chocolate as a various tone in the dark skin category like the way you can have someone who is the same colour as dark chocolate but also someone who is a blue-black skin tone there are slight differences but they all come under the same umbrella. Not undermining your point but when I see comments referring to ‘chocolate’ I was confused because to me they are chocolate.

HoneyB
HoneyB
7 years ago

Adorable!

Nini
Nini
7 years ago

I love these! I’m currently reading through comments on an old thread on the Long Hair Care Forum, and it’s shocking that people believe that children with kinky hair look unkempt when they wear their hair out like this. Some even said it’s not appropriate for school. If I ever have children, no matter their gender, I want them to rock their ‘fro at school like these kids.

Anyways. My favorite is the bottom right one. His expression 🙂

gapch
gapch
7 years ago

Oh the word “kinky” just boils my blood.… so many other ways and phrases to describe their hair

Cee-cee
Cee-cee
7 years ago
Reply to  gapch

What words would you use to describe their hair?

gapch
gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  Cee-cee

tightly curled, afro textured, afro styled, coily, springy, curly, spongy, big, fluffy, free flowing, free formed, gorgeous, type 4 but would i use kinky ? absolutely not. to me and many others its no better than nappy.…. maybe its generational maybe its regional but for me i dont care to describe hair as kinky and it boils my blood when i see it in print or hear it spoken.… its not part of my vocabulary to use.…

HeavnsGirl
HeavnsGirl
7 years ago
Reply to  gapch

It has “kinks” in it. I suspect that it is the negative connotation that makes your blood boil — just like some people take umbrage with being called “black” because the word has been so maligned.

Nappy 4C Rocks
Nappy 4C Rocks
7 years ago
Reply to  HeavnsGirl

@HeavnsGirl wait, some people don’t like being called black?? I’m old school…child of the 70’s, well a baby…I’m BLACK, I’ve never heard heard that…

HeavnsGirl
HeavnsGirl
7 years ago
Reply to  Nappy 4C Rocks

Yes! Some folks use “black” like a 4‑letter word of the profane variety!! “Black & ugly” are often used in tandem.

It’s a sad state of affairs.

gapch
gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  HeavnsGirl

for me it does have a negative connotation. I would say it has “kinks” either. just me and everyone i know .…

gapch
gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  gapch

i wouldnt say that it has “kinks” either

Cass
Cass
7 years ago
Reply to  gapch

I always felt it was better to say kinky instead of nappy. You know kinky is an actual texture right? Kinky- 2. (of hair) closely or tightly curled. Maybe you know something that we don’t. We use silky, frizzy, shaggy, textured, ect to describe a persons hair. What’s wrong with kinky?. If you can find other words please SHARE THEM.

gapch
gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  Cass

see the comment above. thats just a FEW other ways to describe their hair.…

gapch
gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  Cass

could simply say natural textured

loveandnappiness
loveandnappiness
7 years ago
Reply to  gapch

but why though? Their hair IS kinky, that’s not a profane word. Shake off those mental chains of slavery, sheesh.…

gapch
gapch
7 years ago

no chains of slavery… just a word i prefer not to use…

Djanira
Djanira
7 years ago
Reply to  gapch

I once read a comment on BGLH where the poster said she didn’t like to use the word “kinky” because of of it’s sexual connotation or something along those lines

Natural sista
Natural sista
7 years ago

I have the same type hair “KINKY” coily hair. Those children are adorable. These uptight negroes work my nerves about what appropriate title we should use for our hair. It is what it is…nappy, kinky, 4a-4z.. Who cares. I went natural 3 years ago and constantly get comments on my hair. And where are these people from who say these children hair is not appropriate for school? REALLY!!!

gapch
gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  Natural sista

you couldve just as easy said just “coily”

HeavnsGirl
HeavnsGirl
7 years ago
Reply to  gapch

Don’t remove the kinks from your hair, remove them from your brain!” –Marcus Garvey

gapch
gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  HeavnsGirl

if you want to use the word kinky to describe hair feel free but there are many other phrases that i prefer to use…

HeavnsGirl
HeavnsGirl
7 years ago
Reply to  gapch

@gapch

Thank you — now that I have your permission, I can continue to use “kinky” & “nappy” & i addition to “curly” & “coily.”

What a relief.

HeavnsGirl
HeavnsGirl
7 years ago
Reply to  HeavnsGirl

Aw, come on — thumbs down? Who mad at Mr. Garvey, lol?

Djanira
Djanira
7 years ago
Reply to  Natural sista

I’ve used the term “nappy” to describe my hair and I’ve offended others. Certain words just rub some the wrong way

Djanira
Djanira
7 years ago
Reply to  Natural sista

Natural sista — if I could give you a thousand more likes I would. Love it

Saye
Saye
7 years ago

Very nice!

Maria
Maria
7 years ago

Those babies are beautiful & making $$$. It bothers me when I read so many negative comments on Beyonce’s baby Blue Ivy hair is “unkept & nappy”.

SantanaNyla
7 years ago
Reply to  Maria

No, I suspect people are concerned with breakage because the hair isn’t moisturized resulting in a natural mohawk.

cacey
cacey
7 years ago
Reply to  SantanaNyla

i don’t think that’s the reason. i think they truly are appalled that a black person would dare show their hair out in public in all its natural glory not curled to perfection in imitation of looser curls. hair doesn’t automatically break just because it’s dry. and on top of that, i’ll bet the ones doing the most criticizing of the style are probably the very ones whose own manes are in need of serious help.

gapch
gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  SantanaNyla

that is not the reason. people talked about that child texture and style. no one was concerned with if it was moisturized or not…

HeavnsGirl
HeavnsGirl
7 years ago
Reply to  SantanaNyla

MOST babies end up with a weird “hairstyle” at some point or another, due to the way that they sleep. That’s why they end up bald around the sides with only a little tuft on top, lol.

Y’all leave lil Blue alone. Her be crute.

Shon
Shon
7 years ago

Very cute ad. We need more mainstream airtime and people need to stop hiding behind relaxers. It’s not that serious.

Midwestnija
Midwestnija
7 years ago

What would be more school appropriate, if they straightened their hair? Would that look more ‘civilized’? Interesting. Also, kudos to H&M for being bold enough to showcase some African American children that more closely represent the majority.

Bruny
Bruny
7 years ago

In my school, there are so many rules on black girls hair, whether the braids are too long(its a problem)whether we have natural hair, its a problem. We have had many assembly’s that are just related to black girls hair, how it should be kept. Please mind these are the white teachers saying this. They say that afros are too wild and untidy to be left out. Ahhh I get so irritated with people like these.

Mesha
Mesha
7 years ago

Hi Bruny — The natural ladies serving in each branch of the military are having the same issue. Yes EACh branch. I have heard things like, a white supervisor telling a servicemember wearing their hair in double strand twists that her hair is faddish and out of regs. I remember when I was in the Marine Corps that I wasnt allowed to wear more than two braids in my hair until after 1995. Yes 1995 they changed the reg and today 2013 they are still having an issue with our hair. While in bootcamp I didnt have access to a relaxer so… Read more »

SerialQuiller
SerialQuiller
7 years ago

After visiting Sweden earlier this year, I learned that the African/Black culture is fully embraced in Sweden as it is — natural and real. Swedes take no issue with people of other cultures being just themselves, in fact, they get rather passionate about authenticity. H&M has featured many women and men of color in their ads, which is a real example considering it’s a culture that prides themselves on being fair skinned and fair haired. It’s refreshing and will hopefully encourage more westernized companies to open their campaigns to people of all colors in their natural, authentic way.

Cameron
Cameron
7 years ago
Reply to  SerialQuiller

It’s not just Sweden but the Scandinavian culture in general. Although it’s paticularily the Danes and the Swedes. In the U.S Black beauty padgent contestant naturals have been told to have flowing straight hair like Beyonce or Tyra Banks. Miss Denmark 2008 was a kinky haired sister! The Scandinavian culture in general is very tolerant and discrimination of any kind is unnacceptable. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the whites who most loath our hair are descendant of forfathers where all the racists, greedy, overbearing, selfish colonists came from (Britian, Spain, France, Nazi Germany) and tend to come off… Read more »

ispeaknorsecode
ispeaknorsecode
7 years ago
Reply to  Cameron

This is a categorically not true and misinformed. Italy and Poland are two of the most terribly racist countries on the continent. They’re all as bad as each other. There’s no post racial utopia anywhere.
When was the last time you visited?

Cameron
Cameron
7 years ago

Hi ispeaknorsecode; I visted Poland and Italy a couple of years ago and my experience was overwhelmingly positive. Yes, some people in Poland did stare at me, not in a bad way but I reckon it’s just because it’s uncommen to see black people there. While Poles do come across as more stuffy than other Europeans I don’t think it was because I was black. I got lots of attention and the people were very nice. It doesn’t seem like racism is a huge problem there to me. I agree that you can probably find racism throughout parts of Europe, but… Read more »

AnonUKay
AnonUKay
7 years ago
Reply to  Cameron

I come from the UK and it is hands down one of the most tolerant places to live in Europe. The Eastern bloc is generally behind the rest of Europe. London is one of Europe’s most progressive cities, I have yet to meet anyone who ‘loathed’ my 4C hair from any racial background. That being said, Europe is not a utopian dream. I’ve experienced racism recently in both Italy and Paris.

gapch
gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  Cameron

there is racism throughout the UK as well.

gapch
gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  SerialQuiller

thats a rash generalization. they are just as many unaccepting Europeans including those from Sweden and Denmark as there are unaccepting Americans.….

zimzam
zimzam
7 years ago
Reply to  SerialQuiller

I have relatives who live in Sweden, and like everywhere in Europe, Sweden too is becoming more and more right wing. It is pure fantasy to believe that black culture is fully embraced there. Having said that, proper respect to the Swedish documentary makers of the Black Power Mix Tape. That film caused such outrage in America, diplomatic ties were broken for a while.

gigi
gigi
7 years ago

ginger cutie with her puffs!! love love love! <3

Zee
Zee
7 years ago
Reply to  gigi

that’s her natural hair color?

BlairTheArtist
BlairTheArtist
7 years ago
Reply to  Zee

Judging by her eyebrows I’m guessing it is. I can’t imagine anyone putting dye or chemicals in that baby’s hair at that age

Fii
Fii
7 years ago

These kiddies are totes adorbs! It always warms my heart to see kids of color in advertizements. They’re always the cutest!

Browny
Browny
7 years ago

I’m really not trying to be rude, but these type of craziness about how black people should carry their hair is made in America. White teachers have no right to make any rules or make any non-white children feel uncomfortable that their hair should be wear in a certain way… I’m 35 and all my life living in Scandinavia have I ever being disrespected that my hair is not pretty, neither have I ever heard from any black person that they’ve been bullied about their hair. I’m getting too many complements from my Europeans friends as well as a total… Read more »

ema
ema
7 years ago
Reply to  Browny

Its true. I went in Germany to school. I never had this problems with teachers. They never cared, they had better things to do than checking how my hair looks like, unfortunately one of the things they cared was checking my homeworks 🙂

cacey
cacey
7 years ago
Reply to  ema

yesss, my german teacher(s) have complemented my hair, but maaaan oh man the homework thing. they are strict about it!

shelikes
shelikes
7 years ago

y r all the kids the same shade of beige? black kids come in all colors and all hair types. white people are the only ones who come in one color (or lack thereof). mind games.

Viv
Viv
7 years ago
Reply to  shelikes

They are so not the same shade of beige, please look closer. Plus, lighting and makeup also can alter a skin’s appearance. These kids are all beautiful and that is what’s more important.

Sabrina @seriouslynatural

Love it! The more the merrier.
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/August2013.jpg[/img]

TINA SMITH
TINA SMITH
7 years ago

EWWW

Dontfeed
Dontfeed
7 years ago
Reply to  TINA SMITH

[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/TROLL.JPG[/img]

Nappy 4C Rocks
Nappy 4C Rocks
7 years ago
Reply to  TINA SMITH

Tina, stop please

Djanira
Djanira
7 years ago
Reply to  TINA SMITH

You are so rude!

Dolce Leche
Dolce Leche
7 years ago
Reply to  Djanira

I’m starting to think there’s more to it with her than just trolling.

SantanaNyla
7 years ago

Love the natural look.….it’s like coming full circle.

cacey
cacey
7 years ago

i absolutely love this. it’s kinda interesting too because my two-year old has tight coils on his head, and at his daycare the attendants have tried a few times to comb/brush his hair into submission- which is a losing battle of course, as i could have let them know in advance before they ever attempted to waste their time. it’s amazing how black people seem to be so adverse to the showing of natural kinks and coils. i’m proud of my son’s hair, and i love it just the way it is and can’t wait for it to get longer… Read more »

Stace
Stace
7 years ago
Reply to  cacey

Well I guess they learned. Good now they can understand that that’s how the hair is and its not going to change nor should it. I think alot of people are angry at black hair because they automatically assume we are purposely doing something to make it look afro’d or fluffy/puffy, and they find the “taming” style like cornrow and twist to be “fads”. You can’t have it both ways. Black people are not styling their hair or wearing their hair out as a statement piece. So yes you come over here and see if you can handle this head… Read more »

Babz
Babz
7 years ago

It’s beautiful but i’m kind of worried about the little girl at the top right. Color treating hair can involve harmful chemicals and i’m not sure that a child should be submitted to that. If that is her natural hair color, which is not impossible, then I retract my comment.

shani
shani
7 years ago
Reply to  Babz

Looking at the color of her skin and eyebrows, I think that is her natural color. I actually grew up with twin girls who have the same color hair.

Cameron
Cameron
7 years ago
Reply to  shani

Actually, my little cousin who is 17 is mixed with Italian, Irish and Russian and has beautiful “Lindsay Lohan from the Parent Trap” natural dark red hair. Unfortunately she straightens it :/ It could be the little girls real hair color and I’m assuming it is.

gigi
gigi
7 years ago
Reply to  Babz

I was reading something somewhere once, or maybe saw on Discovery [?] the redheads we see now are actually a genetic anomaly resulting from Moors invading the northern countries waaaaay back… the red hue is a rare strain from the strong negroid dark brown/black hair genes mixing with the very strong caucasoid blonde hair genes, sure sometimes you just get brown or some other blondish color, but every now, especially with the genes so pure, I’m sure they hit a sweet spot & get a hue right in the middle — the red. So, the invaders head back down [messing… Read more »

juanicole617
juanicole617
7 years ago

Quite refreshing, indeed.

Titi1003
7 years ago

I LOVE the fact natural hair children were used as models. This was an excellent idea and help younger children to see other children representing themselves rocking their natural hair. It’s saying its ok to be kinky on tv, in school, in a pool! Children need to see examples of themselves represented in all positive ways! I hope to see this in more commercials, movies, tv shows!!!!

Pat
Pat
7 years ago

The statement about Target is true, the one here doesn’t carry kiddie perms and now that I think of it, they don’t carry perms/relaxers for adults. That’s a good thing!!

Stace
Stace
7 years ago
Reply to  Pat

The Targets I go to (at least 3 of them) all carry relaxers. Maybe its a regional thing.

HeavnsGirl
HeavnsGirl
7 years ago
Reply to  Stace

The ones here do too — I’m in Los Angeles.

marilouthegreat
marilouthegreat
7 years ago

love that.big,beautiful,natural hair.i really don’t understand parents that put strong chemicals on their kids hair.i mean why?chemicals and heat,damage not only their hair but somethimes their health let’s not talk about their self esteem.and for all these people that complain about going to school with natural hair i say that,if i were a teacher and saw a kid(white or black i don’t care) with chemically processed hair or straighted with irons and stuff i would call their parents and give them hell.putting your kid in such pain is monstrous in my eyes.

Phylicia
Phylicia
7 years ago

That’s true. But the skin complexion issue remains the same, however…sigh. It really is nice to see this type of hair texture embraced by mainstream retailers, and I am excited to see the day when the skin complexion hierarchy is abolished and all skin complexions are understood as beautiful and desirable, particularly by big business.

Ashley
Ashley
7 years ago
Reply to  Phylicia

I see what you are saying. It is and always has been about the dollar. I think companies are realizing more and more women of African descent are going natural. So they seem to be picking up the trend and featuring more naturals on ads and commercials. I’m happy because it gives kinky hair exposure so people will start to recognize it outside of the natural hair community.

yayaa
yayaa
7 years ago

i predict that within a year natural hair or “afro texture hair” will be the next thing that white people appropriate. not trying to be rude but give it 7 months and it’ll be the 70s all over again.

HeavnsGirl
HeavnsGirl
7 years ago
Reply to  yayaa

Funny you should say that — about a month ago, while driving, I saw a white man with 2 little light-skinned boys with HUGE afros waiting to walk across the street. As I passed them, I looked to check out their hair and saw that they were actually little (like 7 & 9 years old) white boys wearing afro wigs.

stephanieb
stephanieb
7 years ago
Reply to  HeavnsGirl

Wow, I can imagine that was a sight to see. You know they gotta copy EVERYTHING we do!!! Imitation is the highest form of flattery.

Amber
Amber
7 years ago

I do not really like the phrase kinky haired kids. I actually hate that phrase. however I love what h&m are doing. supporting black and beautiful kids. naturally textured hair kids. They are all sooo cute.

CiCi
CiCi
7 years ago

AWW! It is so ridiculously cute!

Sally
Sally
7 years ago

In the UK they’ve been using natural kids with tighter curl patterns in catalogues and things for a while now 🙂 Glad to see that the US is catching up! Not just H&M, other shops like M&S and BHS and Next also use natural haired kids a lot. Love seeing it!!

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