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Opinion: A Weave is Not a Protective Style; It’s Just a Weave

Avatar • Jul 10, 2013

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By Charing Ball of MadameNoire.com

This is not an anti-hair weave post but rather, this is a pro-truth post.

And the hardcore, nitty-gritty straight no chaser-kind truth is that a weave is not a protective style. A weave is just a weave.

Yeah I know, what business is it of mine what someone else puts on their head? It isn’t my business – until folks try to convince me that what I’m seeing is not what I am actually seeing. And that is what has been happening as of late in a couple of the natural hair social networking groups to which I belong. Perhaps because of the change of season, the sites have been awash with posts and pictures of self-proclaimed natural hair women, rocking the 23-inches of Brazilian wet and wavy cascading down their backs. They call it “protective styling,” a term coined to describe the process in which women (and men too) hide their hair from “harmful agents.” It used to just apply to those rocking the braids and cornrows, but some of our more ingenious womenfolks have found a loophole into TeamNatural by playing fast and loose with the lingo to make it more weave-tastic.

Technically, certain wig and weave styles, particularly the sew-in, allow the hair a break from the daily stresses some women do to their hair including processing and perming, tugging and over-styling. And technically certain wigs and weave styles, are a great way to promote growth because your hair is pretty much in a dormant state from such manipulation, thus more free to do what it does uninhibited. But also technically, you have someone else’s hair on your head. And no matter how you try to spin it, that just ain’t natural.

At the core of what bugs me the most about the weave classification as a “protective style” is the distorted, if not counterproductive motives behind it. Honestly natural hair shouldn’t be this high maintenance. And unless there are hair bandits on the loose, hoping to score on the black market with a handful of your natural coils, there is really nothing in our natural environment that we have to protect the hair from. Everything else is truly about accepting and learning how to deal with your own hair as it comes out of your head – whether it comes out extra kinky or extra fine; in the snow, sleet, rain, wind or through hot summers. Acceptance of our hair is supposed to teach us that not every style choice is meant for us but that’s okay because our hair is beautiful anyway. Yet throwing a weave or some braids in your head – while a cute style – teaches you nothing about your hair, especially when you wear it for 11 months out of the year (which many of these womenfolks in TeamNatural are professing to do). All it does is just tucks away the “problem,” some folks refuse to deal with upfront. Of course, the real problem isn’t so much the hair as it is the thinking.

Likewise, what used to be about freedom from more European-centric standards of beauty, which meant forgoing all the unnecessary manipulations we put our hair through in an effort to match, or exceed, those standards – has now turned into growth challenges; angry rants about “shrinkage” and stretching; saturating our hairs with products in hopes of “defining curls” and behind the back selfies of women tugging at a small section of their hair and measuring how close it is to reaching BSL, or bra-strap level. It seems that many women don’t just want healthy hair; they just want lots of hair. And I’m not talking about big kinky, curly hair like a Tracy Ross (but that too) but also long hair, the kind you can swing about like your name was Becky. It’s a sad thing to say but the more I observe this heightened emphasis among naturals for “length” and “protection,” the more I realize that many of us have carried much of the same baggage along with us into what was supposed to be a liberating movement.

It’s true whether or not folks are willing to admit to themselves. And no cutesy, made-up technical term is going to hide the fact that many of these weaved-up naturalists are no different than Shay Shay and her best girlfriend LaQuanita, who trek over to the neighborhood Korean beauty supply store and haggle with them over 18”inches of 100 percent Brazilian. They, like our “protective” stylers, want to wear a weave because they want long hair and their nappy, possibly short, hair won’t enable them to have it. Long hair, don’t care. And think I’m lying or misrepresenting? When was the last time you’ve seen someone with a “protective style” get a short nappy weave? Rest my case counselors.

It probably shouldn’t bother me as much as any of the thousands of other contradictory ways in which we choose to live (present company not excluding). But for the last month or so, I have watched as several well-meaning womenfolk, try genuinely to raise both the contradiction and overuse of the term protective styling issue in these hair groups, only to be ostracized and demonized under the hair-slur of Hair Nazi. More than anything, I wanted to write a post to let those sisters know that you’re not crazy or delusional or hating. Many of us have yet to get past the stage of our “transition” where we stop equating length with strength, healthy condition and overall beauty. That’s why we have to exercise some patience even as we continue to set the record straight about the joys of embracing one’s own curl patterns as our personal biology and genetics intended.

Alternatively for my weave-loving sisters: Who cares if you wear a weave? People stopped tripping about that sometime in the late 80s into the early 90s. If I was rocking a weave I would not hide behind Negro-correct terminologies like “protective styling.” I would wear my weave loudly and proudly, testifying to all of its lengthy, straight and flexibility of styling choices it allows me to achieve that I couldn’t achieve naturally. Seriously, it is truly okay. Just don’t try to con the rest of us into accepting your weave as some sort of amendment to natural hair. Truth is, that weave stopped being natural the day it left the head of its original owner.

Ladies, what are your thoughts?

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jenny
jenny
7 years ago

Do ur thing and let others do theirs and don’t judge cos before we were born it has been there!

ellie4real
ellie4real
7 years ago

why would you wanna get a short nappy weave…wen you can rock your short nappy hair.…jst saying…

Courtney
Courtney
5 years ago
Reply to  ellie4real

Because then it wouldn’t be protective. Defeats the purpose.

Lioness14
Lioness14
7 years ago

I think weaves are a good protective style when handled correctly. Whenever I do a protective style that involves hair that isn’t mine I always try to get afro or kinky curly textured hair to still promote natural hair while protecting my shorter hair. But I would wear straight weaves(full sew in, no leave out). I would do it for the versatility. I think it’s a better effort towards a straight look rather than applying heat to your real hair with the possibility of causing heat damage. And another reason I like weaves/wigs as protective styles is some of the… Read more »

anecine
anecine
6 years ago
Reply to  Lioness14

i don’t think you got the point of this article…

Mary
Mary
6 years ago

Honestly my natural hair and I are not friends. I hate my hair. Its 4c hair and boy after 7 years it is not what I was expecting.
I am sorry but I’ve tried and tried and tried. I am fustrated.

YOLANDA
YOLANDA
6 years ago
Reply to  Mary

I don’t hate my hair but I do get bored with it. I hate twistouts and braidouts, they don’t look right as my hair grows longer. Love wash n gos and wet buns but get bored with those after a few wks. Every blue moon when I’m really irritated with styling, I wear a curly wig. Thinking of doing a blowout or flat iron just to get a different look.

eve-audrey
eve-audrey
6 years ago
Reply to  Mary

what have you tried on your hair? what length is it now? do you hate it because it’s 4C or because it does not respond well to what you do? maybe natural hair is not for everyone if you really hate your hair that much then weave it up or relax it it’s your head after all.

@ yolanda not being judgemental but i don’t understand the women who state they are “bored” with their natural hair. were you bored with your relaxed hair also? when you wear a wig it basically always looks the same aren’t you bored with it?

YOLANDA
YOLANDA
6 years ago
Reply to  eve-audrey

Yes, I did get bored with my relaxed hair and I wear a wig once a month and my hair is longer than my wig so even if it’s the same wig, it’s a different look than my hair. I love my natural hair, it’s long and thick and huge and I get lots of compliments. But it still gets boring. I’ve never been creative with styling and I no longer enjoy having other ppl do my hair so I stick to the same routine. Not everyone is passionate about hair all the time. It is just hair, no matter… Read more »

eve-audrey
eve-audrey
6 years ago
Reply to  YOLANDA


ok then everyone has different opinions nothing wrong with that

trackback

[…] Anyway, there was a post I saw while doing my research stating that the use of weave is not a protective style you can check it out here. […]

tasha fierce
tasha fierce
6 years ago

i chose to stop relaxing my hair because of damage, weaves helped me through the transition and yes i do believe it’s a protective style because when i take my sewn in weave out i notice that my hair is longer and thicker than it was before. i really wish some of these “Natural Nazi’s” get off their high horse, everybody’s journey is different, your choice not to wear a weave as a protective style doesn’t make you better than anyone.

jazz
jazz
6 years ago
Reply to  tasha fierce

I agree. Wanting hair versatility is something ALL women deal with. I have white friends who change their hair color every year or even more often. Black women need to stop using hair as another reason to hate on each other. As a natural, you, nor I, nor anyone else is superior so get a life!

Kayla Tarrant
Kayla Tarrant
6 years ago

What kills me about Black women is why we feel the need to have versatility. No other race of women feels the need to have the ability to have so many different styles. My Indian aunt, who has the beautiful hair that people pay hundreds of dollars for wears her hair the same way every single day. The only time she even cut it was because she has cancer. Blacks are not in a position in society to spend money on frivolous things like “versatility”. There are much better things that we should spend our money on than our hair… Read more »

Laila
Laila
5 years ago
Reply to  Kayla Tarrant

Best comment here!

ebaiden
ebaiden
5 years ago
Reply to  Kayla Tarrant

well, my theory is it allows people to express themselves (I don’t know about the silky peruvian thing though), which can be a part that races back to our ancestrial roots. but when you say versatility, I look at it as straight up natural hair versatility: twistout, braidout, braids, cornrows, afro, wash-n-go. And for those who don’t want to commit.…. ta-da! :Pulls out the wig:

Nicole S.
Nicole S.
6 years ago

I’m considering getting a kinky sew-in at the same length of my hair because I want to give my hair a break from manipulation but still have access to the out styles that I like. I’m OK with other naturals feeling a certain kind of way about weaves. There’s a quote something like, “Other people’s opinions of me are none if my business.” Do what you’re comfortable with.

Mukeven Nelson
Mukeven Nelson
6 years ago

Can you please tell me how did you get your hair this color?

Chandra
6 years ago

Well I did’t start hearing the term “protective style” until I went natural years ago. Before the movement became popular when people wore braids exts or weaves that’s just what it was called? Not protective style. But, at the end of the day a person knows why they are choosing to wear any kind of extensions and if its truly for protective purposes? So we can’t really judge that one?

august
august
6 years ago

WOW. I GET WHERE THIS ARTICLE IS TRYING TO GO BUT THE ARGUMENT IS SHAKY. THERE ARE HOLES IN THIS LOGIC. A WEAVE CAN BE USED AS A PROTECTIVE STYLE IN THE SAME WAY BRAIDS OR TWISTS CAN. ARE THERE PEOPLE WHO USE IT AS A WAY TO HIDE OF COURSE! THERE ARE PEOPLE WHO CONSISTENTLY LEAVE THEIR HAIR IN TWISTS OR BRAIDS OR OTHER STYLES JUST SO THEY DONT HAVE TO DEAL WITH THEIR HAIR THERE ARE PPL WHO USE TWIST-OUTS AND BLOW OUTS AND A SHIT LOAD OF OTHER THINGS TO HIDE BEHIND INSTEAD OF ACCEPTING THEIR HAIR.… Read more »

Lauren G
Lauren G
6 years ago

Yeah I know, what business is it of mine what someone else puts on their head?” The article should have stopped there, and it would’ve saved yourself all of the energy from writing this bullshit and me the headache i received from reading it.

Ariel
Ariel
6 years ago

I wore weave for a whole year, when I took my hair down I re-weaved it. My hair grew 10 to 12 inches that year because of that weave, and I’m doing it all over again. 100% length retention!! ?UNBEWEAVABLE??? Who gives a damn, just shove this ??shitty?article up your ?asshole?!  Lol!!!

naturalintellect92
naturalintellect92
6 years ago

Everyone’s entitled to their opinion, but not everyone is entitled to share it, especially when you can’t even provide a decent argument against what you’re criticizing. Just because you don’t personally like something doesn’t merit writing an article saying weave is something that its not, especially when it IS a protective style (when done healthily) and HAS helped an enormous amount of people in the natural hair community achieve healthy hair. Braids, Twits, loc extensions, & etc. can be equally damaging if not done correctly. Protective styling is any style which protects the hair and allows it to grow without… Read more »

Ali Rey
Ali Rey
5 years ago

I agree with you especially the side note. I paid double the amount I normally pay for weave because it matched my natural hair texture. It all depends on the year and location for me. Those years when I chop my hair off bcuz I’ve damaged it (like this year), best believe I will wear a weave. When my hair is long and healthy, I wear it loud and proud. And when I do wear my real hair I rock braid outs to stretch it bcuz my head/face is a long and I will NOT wear my hair short it… Read more »

NapturallyKia
NapturallyKia
6 years ago

I don’t have a problem with weaves. I only have a problem when women (no matter the state of her hair) uses it as a crutch. When women only feel presentable and pretty with weave that’s an issue.

blackrose16
blackrose16
5 years ago
Reply to  NapturallyKia

Well then she should have centered her piece around that if that was her intention. It could have been an empowering piece about accepting your beauty without extensions. That would have been a great opinion piece, unlike this narcissistic garbage.

Kristen
Kristen
5 years ago

This is an article that was pulled over from another site for black women.

bintalshamsa
bintalshamsa
5 years ago
Reply to  Kristen

It is hypocritical to post it here.

Kristen
Kristen
5 years ago
Reply to  bintalshamsa

I don’t disagree but it’s also an opinion piece. It’s something to talk about and sometimes we need to be aware of the ridiculousness that are other people’s opinions.

Kristen
Kristen
5 years ago

The first word in the title of the article is “Opinion”. So, don’t get upset ladies!

Nakia H.
5 years ago
Reply to  Kristen

And the last words were “Ladies, what are your thoughts?”
So…

Kristen
Kristen
5 years ago
Reply to  Nakia H.

As you see it was in bold, meaning BGLH asked the question. Obviously not Charing Ball. Pick and choose your battles on what you decide to flip out over..this is just ONE person’s opinion.

rashi
rashi
5 years ago
Reply to  Kristen

Exactly!

naturalintellect92
naturalintellect92
5 years ago
Reply to  Kristen

Having an opinion does not mean people cannot disagree with your opinion. Most racist ideals are opinions. Most sexist ideals are opinions. Yet, anger at these opinions is warranted. Now, this is not on that same level, but this is the same type of judgement/generalization that is present in those ideals that are present in this article, so of course people are upset. If the whole point of the natural hair movement is freedom/ liberation, why cast judgement and cause division with a whole group of naturals, basically saying (“you aren’t a real natural”) it’s redic. Seems like the author… Read more »

Kinky Hair Love
Kinky Hair Love
5 years ago

What I take from this is that shes saying: if youre “natural” meaning your own hair out of your own head the way it grows, then putting someone elses hair in your head is NOT natural. Therefore the term “protective style” which natural women use to distinguish styles that protect their natural–out of their own head how it grows–hair, is not context appropriate. This then renders the weave as not protective but merely a weave. Shes not saying that full weaves and wigs dont protect, shes saying they cannot be considered named or called “protective styles” that natural hair wearers… Read more »

Iamnotmyhair83
Iamnotmyhair83
5 years ago

This would be true if she didn’t include braids and twists as protective styles, which can be equally damaging if not taken care of. The author just seems to be not a fan of weave, which is cool, because everyone can like and dislike what they want. She should have just named this “Why I don’t like weave”

Diamond Graham
Diamond Graham
5 years ago

Most weaves smell like shit to me, so I agree with her lol

NoTime4Bimbos
NoTime4Bimbos
5 years ago
Reply to  Diamond Graham

And most of them look like shit (phony) to me. I’ve had (3) and all I ended up with was broken, lost hair. BTW the weaves were done by professionals. My hair just doesn’t like them. And when I see others with them I can usually tell if it’s their own hair or not. I then ask myself, “are they that insecure” or, “are they just wearing it to see if it will make their own hair grow.” I only know of (1) female who actually had nearly WL hair and would sitll wear a weave. I don’t know what… Read more »

SupaYo's Prototype
SupaYo's Prototype
5 years ago

The problem with people who wear weave to protect their hair is that they are ALWAYS wearing a weave. I am natural and maybe once a year I will wear braids just to give my hair a break but 10 months out of the year, I wear my hair PROUDLY!! When I ask all of my friends who wear weave that are natural why they ALL say “I don’t feel like dealing with it”, or “I don’t know what to do with it.”. But why spend all that money ($100-$200)on someone else’s hair when you have your own? Smh

Kp
Kp
5 years ago

News flash braids are still weave and judge your friends not a whole community of women. I wear weaves as a protective style in the winter season only because of the harsh conditions. There’s no moisture in the air and that causes my hair to break and she’d like crazy. Not to mention why do ppl cared so much to judge the next woman’s decisions on being or not being natural. What she eats doesn’t make you Shit ijs in sick and tired of all this weave shaming.

Aliyah
Aliyah
5 years ago
Reply to  Kp

News flash braids aren’t weave . It’s only a weave if you get FAKE hair added . I wear cornrow braids without weave . It’s my real hair

naturalintellect92
naturalintellect92
5 years ago

Why is it a problem? Why does what another person does with their hair bother you? Maybe they are ALWAYS wearing a weave because they are ALWAYS seeing the length retention results they want to see. Maybe they are ALWAYS wearing a weave because they are ALWAYS too busy. Not liking to deal with hair is not analogous to hating their hair. Some people don’t have the time + passion about hair like that. If you are really so PROUD about your hair, why don’t you keep on doing you and stop judging people for what they do with their… Read more »

adicadabra
adicadabra
5 years ago

Whether it is wigs, weaves, braids, etc.–if it allows your hair to grow and be healthy, then it is a protective style. It’s really that simple. This article is pointless!

Tiffany
Tiffany
5 years ago

Exactly!

Cheryl
Cheryl
5 years ago

I fell for the “protective style” lingo! Weaves are SO NOT protective to your hair. Your hair invariably suffers from lack of moisture, at least mine does. And even after leaving it in only two or three weeks, I’m combing out gobs of hair. So I can’t imagine that people leaving it in for a month or more are doing anything but kidding themselves. The only true protective style besides braiding or twisting at night might be a wig. But then by this community’s definition,that’s not natural. But who cares? Do you.

naturalintellect92
naturalintellect92
5 years ago
Reply to  Cheryl

Any “protective style” without moisture is damaging. You have to add moisture to any protective style for it to work without being damaging. For example, I have a friend who constantly wears twists (her own hair) in an updo, but doesn’t moisturize it. Her hair has not grown any longer in four years, and she often complains about damage. Also with box braids/ marley twists, if you don’t spritz your hair or apply moisture regularly you will get lint balls at the root and your hair will fall out. If you moisturize your hair under the weave or wig (by… Read more »

ReeRee
ReeRee
5 years ago

This rant encourages conflict between black women, as if there aren’t enough. It’s saying one woman is better than another, by attempting to define who gets to be considered a ‘real natural’ based on protective styling. Natural hair means no chemicals and protective style means little or no manipulation. There’s no hair bible! Weaves and wigs are protective styles! How can we uplift each other if there’s always a woman trying to one up herself by knocking someone else journey. As for love of one’s black hair and the natural hair uprising. Hair is associated with beauty standards, long hair… Read more »

Ali Rey
Ali Rey
5 years ago

This article is incredibly IGNORANT and OFFENSIVE. Even though I had the same thought that weave, wigs, and lace fronts were kind of counter productive to the natural movement. But saying that it’s not a protective style is the opposite of her so-called truth. I paid for the most EXPENSIVE hair that mimicked my hair texture perfectly and everyone thought it was my real hair, because I wanted the natural look but I also wanted the length and fullness without having to manipulate my own hair so much. It was beautiful but way more difficult to manage than my own… Read more »

Ali Rey
Ali Rey
5 years ago

I agree. This article is so derogatory and offensive with that Shay Shay nonsense.

SHL
SHL
5 years ago

This article is shocking. I am a natural hair blogger from South Africa. The natural movement has gained traction here over the last ten years and we too are seeing these types of incredible offensive commentary. We all went natural for our own reasons some political, some health still some may have other reasons. As an individual you have to be able to know that your ideas, opinions, choices and actions end with your person. You cannot and you may not extend them or project them onto others. Others have their own ideas to which they are entitled. You make… Read more »

Kristen
Kristen
5 years ago

What I’m saying is to not take ONE person’s view to heart so much that you get yourself upset about it, just because it may not be the same view as yours. You have to pick and choose your battles on what you get upset over. It’s not healthy to get upset at everything.

UghPplTheseDays
UghPplTheseDays
5 years ago
Reply to  Kristen

And what are you? The emotion police? Just because the article didn’t offend you or make you upset, does not mean that it didn’t upset others. To the people it did upset, you have no right to tell them what they should and should not feel. If it is not a big deal to you, and it didn’t bother you at all, why are you even commenting?One thing I can’t stand is when people are having a discussion and someone chimes in “Why is this a big deal/ Why does anyone care?” If you don’t have anything to add, don’t… Read more »

Kristen
Kristen
5 years ago

Okay, you’re obviously emotional. Be happy, sad, crazy, loud, quiet, and/or deaf all you want. You’re anger is with the wrong person. You could have simply ignored my comment. Since you have a major problem with this article, take it up with the original author and BGLH for posting it.

Ama
Ama
5 years ago

I am sick of people especially black people mocking those of us who reside in the ghetto by calling us “ghetto” or “ratchet” or “Shay Shay etc.” This may be hard to believe but people are the same wherever you go. This mockery is disgusting to me as I have a college degree, work for the government, and choose to live in the ghetto. This is where my people reside, where I work, and where I play. Instead of thinking you are better than Shay Shay why dont you think about where those stereotypes came from and you will find… Read more »

ebaiden
ebaiden
5 years ago
Reply to  Ama

i want to say something: Working for the government isnt a come up you know. I mean, its great… especially if you’re helping the community like after school child care programs, helping rehabilitate incarcerated folks etc. And even though you graduated with a college degree (which is great… but… uh Millions do as well) , I still don’t think it’s ALL that, especially if you use it to go work for someone else, who will still be above you, and you’ll be financially dependent on. I do think that if you have your own business and you are in control… Read more »

Ama
Ama
5 years ago
Reply to  ebaiden

Ummm, you obviously dont know the meaning of bragging or your reading comprehension is bad. I was merely showing that the “ghetto ratchet” stereotype does not ring true as we are not caricatures to be mocked. I was also stating the above to show that I for one can leave my hood for the suburbs if I want to as I can do that economically but I choose not to. The hood is not a dead end to me it is where I can be with my people and help them come up if I can. But in response to… Read more »

Iruka Nnakwe
Iruka Nnakwe
5 years ago
Reply to  Ama

I agree with you Ama! I’m sure the author of this post did not mean to offend anyone. Though we both agree with the message provided, the author’s reference to “Shay Shay” was not necessary. I am so thankful for the work you are doing in your community! We need more sisters like you to inspire our youth and promote unity, upliftment,and black economic independence. Though you provided that information merely to discredit stereotypes (obviously, not to brag :/), you have truly accomplished so much! Thank you! <3

Ama
Ama
5 years ago

Maybe these are ALWAYS tired excuses those who dont like their natural hair use. A natural hair regimen does not need to be complicated. It just baffles me that people can actually fix their lips to say they dont have time for something like this it is the hair that grows from your scalp Naturally

ebaiden
ebaiden
5 years ago

For the longest, I’ve never liked wigs, weaves, extensions or anything that came from someone else’s hair that was chopped off for sacrificial purpose (or made in a lab). .…. ON ME. They freak me out. Now, it doesnt mean I oppose the concept, because what doesnt work for a person, might work for the next person. I see people with extensions, and let me tell you they are GAWGEOUS!!! I feel like its not the artificial hair that exhumes the confidence, its just the thought of adding hair to their own makes them express themselves more than they could… Read more »

Msclassy
Msclassy
5 years ago

I have noticed this as well and completely agree. I’m not again weaves or wigs but please don’t say you are natural when we rarely see YOUR hair. Come on now! Then for those who are using this to grow out there hair. Which I am not gonna lie most certainly will, just how do you plan to magically know how to maintain and keep it once you reach your desired length? Its is very possible to grow your hair out by protective styling & using your own hair. I did it and have waist length hair. I stopped wearing my… Read more »

Tiffany
Tiffany
5 years ago

I have noticed that some women have been hiding their textures under the guise of protective styling and that’s a valid point that should be brought to light. However, this article was filled with a lot of incendiary wording, opinions presented as facts, and just gross overstatements. Weave IS a protective style- it prevents over manipulation of the hair by getting it out of sight. Protects the hair => protective style. Lots of weaves allow you to wash, moisturize, deep condition, etc the same as you would if you rocked twists. So yes, it does work as a protective style.… Read more »

Tiffany
Tiffany
5 years ago
Reply to  Tiffany

Interestingly enough, I stumbled across my own post, 5 months later and, in the last month or so, I’ve started experimenting with making my own wigs. This is in response to the damage caused by wearing my hair out all summer and wanting to avoid the damage from my usual protective styles (braids/twists, crochet braids, etc) and I absolutely love it! Partially because it feeds my DIY obsession, but also because its easy, but gives me complete access to my own hair as I nurse it back to health (something my other protective styles did not do) while keeping my… Read more »

Shay
Shay
5 years ago

Live and let live. Why not praise our sisters for being bold enough to embrace natural hair? Who cares if we’re length obsessed? Most of us had no idea that our hair could grow past shoulder length so now that we realize we can have it too we want it! There’s nothing wrong with that. I’ve been natural for a long time and in the beginning I was a blog hopping, YouTube watching natural Nazi. But once I came into my own, I drew away from all of the media to create my own space (that happens to be filled with… Read more »

elite hair lounge
elite hair lounge
5 years ago

i really loved this post, this has been topic of discussion in my salon all week as i too have the same views and have been talking to my customers about it and trying to stress to them to stop following these youtube gurus that feed their mind with just what everyone else is saying about hair care and “protective styles”

k.h.
k.h.
5 years ago

.….nah. I get a sew in done about twice a year and leave it in for between a month and two months. IT IS A PROTECTIVE STYLE. I don’t have any leaveout and YES I’VE HAD SHORT AND CURLY HAIR Put in. Many asked why when I already have long hair (past BSL) but I just wanted to try something new while keeping my ends PROTECTED. I think the author of this, Charing Ball, needs to get better educated about this in all honesty. do some abuse it yes, but that doesn’t change that if used correctly your hair can… Read more »

Patty
Patty
4 years ago

If you can tell it is a weave it is a weave. People need to wear their hair the way it looks best not because they want it.

YeahAboutThatThough
YeahAboutThatThough
4 years ago

Whatever. I grew my hair out to 3 inches above my waist while wearing a weave. Thanks, I’ll let myself out. *natural hair flip*#theend

jazij
jazij
4 years ago

I agree with some points in this article, one in particular is there fact that your hair does not need protection from the elements! No other race has to do “protective styling” to get their hair to grow, nor do we. Why is everyone under this crazy impression that protective styling is necessary? It seems to me like it’s just a way for people to continue wearing weave but say they are natural. People have walked this earth for years, and their hair has been perfectly fine. With this natural hair movement, there has been a dramatic increase in people… Read more »

christinanolanXD
christinanolanXD
4 years ago
Reply to  jazij

exactly!!! ugh

Court
Court
4 years ago

Let people do what they wish with their hair. If you don’t prefer to wear a weave good for you, but a natural can still be a natural with a weave. Now if they wear it 24/7 and claim the weave texture is their natural hair then that’s different but that’s like telling a woman with relaxed hair that wears a weave that real hair is not chemically processed. Let’s choose our battles better, if it’s not hair then it’s skin texture.

Imani
Imani
5 years ago

Wait wait wait. You’re talking about all black women with weaves want is long hair, meanwhile the name of your website IS Blackgirllonghair. Wow. ? This post is judgemental, disrespectful and disgusting. By the definition of a protective style, which is protecting your hair from the elements, ect, it in fact is a protective style. End of story. Can’t stand when people get all high and mighty because some people do things differently than them. Whoopty damn doo you don’t wear weave, or care about shrinkage or stretching. But are the people that do not truly “natural” if they do?… Read more »

NoTime4Bimbos
NoTime4Bimbos
5 years ago

I appreciate your opinions. However I have some as well. You said, “growth challenges (I LOVE THEM GET INVOLVED EVERY CHANCE I GET); angry rants about “shrinkage” (I HAVE TONS OF IT AND I HATE) and stretching (I DON’T RELAX MY HAIR); saturating our hairs with products in hopes of “defining curls” (THAT’S A GOOD THING IF IT DOESN’T DRY OUT THE HAIR AND HAS MOISTURIZING QUALITIES) and behind the back selfies of women tugging at a small section of their hair and measuring how close it is to reaching BSL (THOSE ARE GOALS-NOTHING WRONG WITH THAT. IT CAN BE… Read more »

livylovely
livylovely
5 years ago

What the only reason my real hair is as long it is has to due with the fact that I constantly wear a weave, which protects my real hair, so how isn’t it a protective style? I don’t hate my real hair I think its beautiful once I let I curl up, but I worry about my hair breaking off due to daily styling and the elements, ( and I tend to look like a 13 year old with out my weave) so sew-ins it is. It’s not about the length because my real hair comes pass my shoulder, it’s… Read more »

PrettyGirlw5pearls
PrettyGirlw5pearls
5 years ago

I think this article is contradictory bullshit. Opting to put heat, color, or overly manipulate weave instead of your own hair IS protecting it. The author begrudgingly admits this, but then continues on with this foolishness.
You don’t like weave? Don’t wear one. Just don’t ever fix your mouth to say that because my afro is covered that I’m less natural.

mai-buns
mai-buns
5 years ago

I personally agree with this. I’m also very frustrated with styles that use synthetic hair being classified as ‘natural hair’. I don’t believe that it can be considered a natural hair style if 75% percent of it consists of hair other than your own. Yes, your hair is still natural, however the style is not. I don’t believe we should pretend as if there aren’t Black naturals who will claim that they’re ‘protective styling’ their hair when really they just longing for straight or looser hair. ‘And no cutesy, made-up technical term is going to hide the fact that many of… Read more »

Missedwards
Missedwards
5 years ago

Personally, people should just let people classify their styles as they wish and keep it moving. Having an opinion doesn’t make one a natural hair Nazi, but jumping on every post and going out of one’s way to set someone straight on their personal choices or correct them based on your personal definitions does.

Von
Von
3 years ago

No lies told throughout any of this article. I haven’t gone through the comments yet but ooooh, I can imagine there are some mad ones! 😉

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