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Does Having Natural Hair Mean Using All-Natural Products?

Avatar • Jun 24, 2013

Earlier this month, I wrote two articles for Black Girl with Long Hair about safely using heat on hair, and UV protecting hair during the Summer. Although my articles on The Mane Objective and BGLH are generally well-received, I caught an unusual amount of flack for the product/ingredient recommendations I made. Not because they were expensive or it appeared that I was name-dropping for endorsements, but because the products weren’t “natural”. As a blogger sometimes comments from readers can rub me the wrong way. But the more experience I get under my belt, I find myself looking for teachable moments and opportunities in the feedback from readers. These articles got my wheels turning, no doubt.

The responses from these articles raised an important question for me: just because we are all natural or on the natural journey, does that mean EVERYTHING that touches our tresses has to be 137.6% natural? If oils, juices and berries, butters, and dry shrubs can’t get the job done, does that mean all other options are off the table?

Let’s discuss.

The Case for All-Natural

There’s no doubt about it, in our society of side-effects and all artificial everything, cozying up to anything born in a beaker can be scary. Harmful side effects at certain concentrations (and what manufacturer discloses how much propylene glycol they use?) coupled with ingredients you need a PhD in Material Science to pronounce make seeking out natural solutions almost a no-brainer. If coconut oil can seal my curls and help prevent water loss in my hair, do I really need to spend money on a curl sealing product that likely contains mineral oil or petrolatum? If Tea Tree Oil or BAQ Henna can keep my scalp conditions in check, do I really need salicylic acid or zinc pyrithione shampoo? The short answer is, of course not. When it comes to natural hair, our tresses tend to thrive under minimalist conditions: low-manipulation, gentle handling, etc. Using natural alternatives to the products that badly burned us before falls right in that vein. Instead of costly shampoos, many naturals use apple cider vinegar or Indian Healing Clay to cleanse. To help retain moisture, leave-ins containing aloe vera juice, oils, butters and more can be mixed up at the bathroom sink.

Along with going the au-naturale route comes the holistic benefits that the ingredients bring. Omegas, vitamins, nutrients, strengthening, follicle and scalp stimulation, elasticity, moisture, and more. Many of our favorite oils and butters have amazing nutritive and healing properties that beat out the most expensive shelf products on any given day. On top of that, they tend to be scores cheaper. I can nab all of my pure, unrefined natural hair essentials (shea butter, coconut oil, aloe vera juice, apple cider vinegar) for around $20 or less — and each one will last me months. The final benefit to all natural? No crazy side effects or potential toxicity down the road (will speak to a caveat to this soon). In many cases, the natural products used on the hair are just as good for the body –outside and in. Coconut oil can be used for hair, skin, nails, cooking, smoothies and more. Apple cider vinegar and aloe vera are purported to have amazing healing and disease-fighting properties.

The Case for Chemicals

Of course, natural is almost always going to be preferred to anything chemical‑y. But what about your favorite conditioner? Chances are it contains ingredients like cetyl, stearyl, or cetaryl alcohol. Sure, these creamy, fatty alcohols that make our hair feel baby smooth and make detangling a breeze are a dream. But did you know that these fatty alcohols (derived from coconut or palm oil) are created by heating said oils with a strong base such as lye (sodium hydroxide)? Even knowing this, you aren’t going to throw away all your conditioner bottles, or stop cowashing, right? Sometimes, we just have to accept that things we’ve been led to believe are horrendous actually aren’t so bad. Maybe you’ve just been told that certain things were no-no’s, without any basis in fact.

Honestly speaking, sometimes the inability to pronounce ingredients (let alone decipher what they mean) is off-putting. How many times have you stood on the haircare aisle at Target and skimmed the back of a product bottle saying “Water, ok… shea butter, ok… 18-mlkfgnudbidsgnuigpf — what the heck?!” I understand, it can get confusing. And what’s worse is sometimes ingredients just sound bad. For example, behentrimonium methosulfate. Doesn’t that just sound like something that can’t do a thing for your hair but make it dry and crunchy? Well, you couldn’t be more wrong. Turns out, behentrimonium methosulfate is neither drying nor a sulfate (like SLS). Behentrimonium methosulfate is actually a super gentle surfectant made from non-GMO (imagine that!) rapeseed (canola oil), and is one of the mildest detangling ingredients out there. It doesn’t cause buildup, or irritation to the scalp. Sounds like a dream ingredient to have in your conditioner — gentle cleansing and detangling without drying. And technically, it’s made from something you probably have in your kitchen.

And sometimes, there are things that natural oils, butters, and extracts can’t do. Case and point: heat protection. If you’re serious about preserving your curls, coils, and kinks, you’ve likely invested in a heat protecting spray or serum of some sort. Even more likely, that spray contains silicones. Why? Because cones simply put, are better at delaying or mitigating the transfer of heat from combs and irons to hair. Not saying that oils can’t do this, but just that silicones are better at it, and heat protectants tend to be formulated to withstand direct heat up to specific temperatures. For more about why you shouldn’t fear the big bad ‘cones, click here.

Things to Consider

Before you decide which side of the fence to sit on (I personally kicked in a few planks so I can go back and forth), there are a few things to consider:

1. The processing and source of natural ingredients. If you’re truly concerned about the potential health-harming impacts of synthetic ingredients, then you need to apply that same level of scrutiny to your natural product choices. Organic, non-GMO produce, cold-pressed virgin oils and butters, and making sure everything is 100% pure is always best. More expensive (sometimes), but best.

2. Be informed. By all means, there are some outright BAD ingredients out there. Drying alcohols are drying alcohols, and no amount of other ingredients can change that. Parabens are still of concern. Some love mineral oil and petrolatum/petroleum, and believe products like Miss Jessie’s and Blue Magic can do no wrong. Others believe the ingredients to be carcinogenic and cause irritation. Research the facts, and decide for yourself.

3. Mixing your own products can be fun, but there are two major considerations. One, making sure your mixtures work. Water and oil don’t mix, so no matter how much you whip and stir, eventually without an emulsifying agent, your concoction will separate. Take it from me, my flaxseed shea custard looked GROSS after 1.5 days. Two, the shelf life of DIY products tends to be much shorter than those sold in stores. This is because store bought options contain anti-fungal and anti-microbial agents — necessary for preserving the product, and fighting against the critters you leave behind whenever you stick your fingers in the product jar. If you’re going to DIY, seek out natural preservatives like Rosemary Extract and Tea Tree Oil.

Bottom Line

As with everything, at the end of the day you have to do what works for you. If you choose to go the all-natural route, then by all means do so. Just don’t knock those who don’t think silcones and multi-syllabic ingredients are that bad — and vice versa. All of our hair is different, and responds differently to products. Some folks like the self-starter/DIY nature of natural hair, others would just rather scoop some products off the shelf at Target or Sally’s. Neither is right or wrong. Like I said before, I straddle both sides of the fence depending upon how I’m feeling. I love my DIY fluffy styling cream, ACV rinses, and flaxseed gel. But at the same time, my hair responds well to silicones, and some of my favorite products have “laboratory” written all over them… and that’s okay for me. What about you?

Which side of the Natural Hair Product Fence do you fall on? Do you use purely natural products, or do some “natural no-no’s” find their way into your product stash?

For more from Christina check out her blog, The Mane Objective. You can also find her on Instagram and Facebook.

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About Christina Patrice

Born, raised, and living in Los Angeles, Christina is BGLH's resident transitioning expert and product junkie. In addition to loving all things hair, she is a fitness novice and advocate of wearing sandals year-round. For more information on transitioning, natural hair, and her own hair journey, visit maneobjective.com. Or, if you like pictures follow Christina on Instagram @maneobjective.

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Mateland
7 years ago

I use 100% natural and chemical free products by My Sisters’ Natural and have for over a year and a half exclusively. When I wash and go I use their curl defining gel. When I go straight, I blow dry and flat iron without that burn (even the burn smell). They will be available to the public next month at http://www.mysistersnatural.com
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/20130610_193124.jpg[/img]

cb
cb
7 years ago
Reply to  Mateland

no thank you

Liz
Liz
7 years ago
Reply to  Mateland

You might be trying to genuinely recommend a product but the way you wrote it makes it seem more like an advertisement. JS

Mateland
7 years ago
Reply to  Liz

That is true, I am. It is a new line of products and they are 100% natural, chemical free, not crazy expensive, and it is a new company started by sisters who, based on their own personal experience, want to provide quality, chemical free hair and skin products to everyone, for a reasonable price. It’s for people that cannot afford to pay $20–25 for a 2- 5 oz jar of natural moisturizer or leave-in conditioner. I’m just trying to get the information out there and although the products are not just for natural hair, they are natural products. So if… Read more »

Charlotte
7 years ago

I agree with you and think this is a well written, well researched post. I have a little story behind this. My blog name is Paleo Beautiful. I am on the Paleo Diet but I had started my natural hair journey quite some time before I went on Paleo and while all of the women (who either lacked curly hair or had a much less dry variety of it) were using all natural, DIY stuff for everything, I stayed hooked on my Tresemme Smooth and Silky for a long time because the only thing I knew how to do with… Read more »

Jasper
Jasper
7 years ago

Lol at dry shrubs. I try to not use mineral oil/petroleum, sulfate a and parabens. Keyword try. I have products from when I was starting out thar contains those and I do plan on using them up and not buying again.

Steinberg
7 years ago

I use natural products as possible, and occasionally coconut milk and oil works fine on me. There’s no risk at mixing and creating DIY hair care products, as long as you ensure its all natural. But I can say that organic products promote less/no side effects. Indeed, worthy of investing. Thanks for the ideas!

Adrienne
Adrienne
7 years ago

That is problems i been having for a long time with natural sista because i told them it is better to use natural product. You don’t know if there is something like ppd or lye in products …most natural hairs chopped because of chemicals but they come back to chemical. Think abt it? In hairlista formus we were agruing abt cheapie hair products and I told them that most are tested or having chemical like Tresseme, Aussie, Dove, Ivory, etc. Then one girl who really like Aussie or Herbal Essence went to do a deep research seeing who is right?… Read more »

Charlotte
7 years ago
Reply to  Adrienne

I would agree 100% with you but that in fact is what I see a lot of ladies doing, using natural products as much as possible. I deep condition with all diy stuff. I use catnip tea, avocados, olive oil, honey, argan oil, sometimes bananas, and mayo as well. My research indicates that these things can do for me what a lot of products claim. On the other hand I buy close to natural conditioners like giovanni. I was using Blensblend which is 98% natural, but I have not found it necessary to spend that much because Giovanni 50:50 works… Read more »

Mateland
7 years ago
Reply to  Adrienne

I agree with you completely.

Andrea
Andrea
7 years ago

I always find this topic funny. I don’t understand why some naturals get so bent out of shape over what products people choose to use in their hair. Like you said, conditioners aren’t natural and I haven’t come across a natural preservative yet. I think we should be far more concerned with what we’re putting in our bodies than what we’re slathering on our hair!

Jessica
Jessica
7 years ago
Reply to  Andrea

I agree Andrea! I wonder how many that are so quick to judge someone that doesn’t use all natural products in their HAIR occasionally enjoy a soda or a quick lunch at a fast food restaurant… Or for the sake of saving money, don’t always eat organic fruits and vegetables and poultry…Or grass fed beef… Or ever use bleach to clean their house or wash their clothes or use face washes or astringents that have chemicals… Or wear makeup? Like… Really? Come on now… Live and let live, do what is best for you- whatever that means to YOU

Jessica
Jessica
7 years ago
Reply to  Jessica

Or wear commercial brand deodorant?! I could go on and on lololol

deandrea
deandrea
7 years ago
Reply to  Jessica

well, there are some that smell like they don’t use deodorant at all..

Yawn
7 years ago
Reply to  Andrea

I find comments like yours funny, why is it such a big issue that naturals have differing/varying opinions? What constitutes “hell bent”? So because one natural says “IMO, stay away from possibly cancer causing chemicals that have been banned in Europe.…”–they are hell raisers or “nazis” or “judging” How dare they present information I’m not interested in hearing! WTF do they think they are!

Damn, when did we become such pansies incapable of hearing differing opinions without feeling attacked or OMG—judged. I swear some of you are always so defensive.

Jessica
Jessica
7 years ago
Reply to  Yawn

Well… I don’t think that I used the term nazis or said “hell bent” but I apologize if you took it that way… My only point is that it seems that we/ people in the natural community seem to be so judgmental of each other, especially those that don’t only use 100% natural products when it’s not always that serious. Yes, some people only use natural ingredients, does that make them more natural than the next? In my opinion, I don’t think so. In that case, we have to stop featuring icons that have colored their hair because that is… Read more »

JazzWife
7 years ago

What an extremely well written and informative post. Thank you. I still run from silicones and other chemical‑y products but at least now I’ll think about for a minute before I reject them. And who knows? Maybe I’ll give something chemical‑y a whirl.

Mai
Mai
7 years ago

The natural hair vs. natural lifestyle debate is so frustrating to me; it sounds like one of those “a real natural is…” statements. It doesn’t matter what products a person uses as long as they work for her. BGLH showcases women with gorgeous hair who all use different products — some olive oil, others herbal essence. These women, especially those who have been long term naturals or have longer hair have been fine tuning their regimen for years. They know what works for their hair and that is why their hair is so long and healthy. You dont have to… Read more »

LBell
LBell
7 years ago
Reply to  Mai

*co-signs and raises both hands in the air — one holding a bottle of olive oil, the other holding a bottle of Herbal Essences Hello Hydration* :o) I’ve said it before, I’ll say it again: The ONLY THING all naturals have in common is that we’re not using chemicals to permanently alter the texture of our hair. Other than that, THERE ARE NO RULES except the ones that work for you and your hair. If I lost my mind and decided to heat-straighten my hair this weekend, nothing but old-school grease (first ingredient: petrolatum) would ensure that my hair would stay… Read more »

lovemahair
lovemahair
7 years ago
Reply to  LBell

Totally agree no rules to being natural, just plain old trial and error.Listening to your hair needs and also building a better relationship with your hair by changing how you view it.

I tried using all organic stuff and fell off the bandwagon when I moved so back to store products for me.

I still love my oils and Anita Grant products from time to time but I’m not strict on just using all natural things anymore.

Jessica
Jessica
7 years ago

I am on the “I use chemicals” side of the fence. Everyone’s hair is different, and I tried the all natural ingredients route when I first chopped, but it just didn’t work for me. The extensive list of things to avoid was just too much for me and I didn’t like the way my hair felt. Of course, maybe I just didn’t have the right ratio if products, but… I was just over it. Now, my fav products are store bought! I LOVE Aussie 3 minute miracle, suave almond and Shea conditioner and Hawaiian Silky. My hair is growing and… Read more »

Jessica
Jessica
7 years ago
Reply to  Jessica

And I use a Loreal shampoo (gasp) for color treated hair… And the deep conditioner I follow it up with is “formulated for natural hair”… But I’m pretty sure it’s not all natural either

luminous
luminous
7 years ago

I use mostly natural products after years of experimenting. I turned to natural products out of frustration with dry hair.

merry
merry
7 years ago

this article is pretty condescending to people who believe in using natural products. there are often deeper reasons why people choose to focus on using natural products. clearly, the author just doesn’t get it.

Christina
7 years ago
Reply to  merry

Hi Merry,

In no way was this article meant to be condescending. It simply provides cases for both, and is written in a way for readers to be able to draw their own conclusions. I don’t promote that one is better than the other, or that those who choose to abide strictly by one are better/worse off than someone else. The bottom line is to always do what works best for you and your hair, which is stated.

Thanks!

Alice
7 years ago

I use a mix-my favorite products fall in the are all natural and straight up chemical cocktails I would have no hope of recreating without a PhD camps. The only thing I look for in a hair product at this point in my natural hair life is does it work with my hair and does it work with my budget.

Everyone’s hair is different. Do what works for you, your hair, your budget and your lifestyle.

Jennifer Kennedy
7 years ago

I use a combo of natural and non-natural hair products. For me, it all boils down to convenience.

I used to spend TONS of time concocting the best ingredients for my hair, which added more time to my regimen! So, I’ve switched certain products to non-natural out of pure convenience.

It really comes down to your personal desire (not anyone else’s) and how each product works with your hair. Anything else is irrelevant.

Thank for the post!

lily
lily
7 years ago

Does it even matter!?!?? SMH.

lily
lily
7 years ago
Reply to  lily

everyone should do what works for them

Camille
Camille
7 years ago

Very well-written article. I’m not as judgmental when others use or suggest products that aren’t natural, because I do agree to use what works for you. I guess I lean towards natural products because of the compete 180-degree turnaround my hair did when I started. The more I used natural products and DIY mixes, the more my hair responded and retained length. So I guess that’s what works for me. But I have no problems trying something less natural, as long as it doesn’t have anything I find too harsh for my hair. One thing though, I don’t agree that… Read more »

mangomadness
mangomadness
7 years ago

Q: Does Having Natural Hair Mean Using All-Natural Products? A: No, but it leads to an awareness of the benefits of using natural, non-toxic products for hair, skin, body, home, etc. I vowed to never get another hair relaxer after experiencing a horrible, painful chemical burn. After making my choice to return to my natural hair, I learned of the dangerous chemicals and toxins in hair relaxers. To make a long story short, I learned of the dangerous chemicals and toxins in personal care products, food, cleaning products, etc. Because of the aforementioned, I prefer to use natural, non-toxic products for… Read more »

Yas
Yas
7 years ago

You really make several great points. It really comes down to getting educated and getting familiarized with what is on the label. I find that my routine is somewhat mixed between the natural and the chemical; but I always try to defer to products that have fewer added chemicals or alcohols high on the ingredients list. It’s not always easy to avoid chemicals, but I find that alcohols (in particular) tend to be super drying on my hair. My hair has to be moisturized at least twice a day, so excessive alcohol would really undo my efforts.

coffeeandfingernails
7 years ago

When I first went natural, all of the sites full of lists of things I couldn’t put in my hair were so intimidating, as were the various posts on THE must-have homemade blend. The process of going natural itself was intense enough without the added pressure of feeling like I had to become an amateur chemist. I just wanted to be able to stop by the hair aisle at the supermarket as I had all my life. At some point, I just decided that I’d try different products until I found something that worked, while choosing the natural stuff whenever all… Read more »

Tabatha
Tabatha
7 years ago

I us both because sometimes my hair responds to some products with a chemical instead rather than something natural. I roll with the punches and when it plateaus I switch it up.

msboogee
msboogee
7 years ago

IYjinkk

kerida
kerida
7 years ago

i have natural; i love miss jessie’s products; tried all the natural, diy stuff, never worked for me. i don’t go around on hair forums with a face full of (i’ll bet “non-natural”) makeup giving ppl flack about what they choose to put on their hair
i find it quite ironic

Jessica
Jessica
7 years ago
Reply to  kerida

That was exactly my point, Kerida.

Tessa
Tessa
7 years ago

Thank you for this article. It was well written and informative. I have wasted so much money on hair products. But, I have found that the less I put on my hair, the better it feels. I persevered for weeks using coconut oil because I wanted my hair to like it 🙂 (Love it on toast, btw). I finally stopped using it on my hair because my hair still felt dry. I will use coconut oil as a pre-shampoo conditioner, but that’s it. When all is said and done, let’s respect our differences. I’ve learned a lot reading the comments… Read more »

carlyfanjaxfan
7 years ago

I’ve made a decision to transition out of the use of chemical laden and possibly cancer causing ingredients even though some of these products work so well.

I will move to an all natural regimen but will go DIY because the cost of all natural/organic products are outrageous.

D.K.
7 years ago

I happily sit on the “all natural” side of the fence; my hair wouldn’t have it any other way, and I don’t believe in knowingly putting harmful ingredients on or in my person anyway.

vertmoot.blogspot.com

Dallas
7 years ago

I envy the women who have the budget to sample hair products not knowing if they’ll work or not, but I certainly don’t judge them! I simply can’t bring myself to buy an 8oz. bottle of anything that costs $10+ that MIGHT last 2–3 washes. It’s the only reason I’m mainly DIY, but I like the challenge of creatively working with what I have.

cho10
cho10
7 years ago

i love this article. so many people seem to conflate having natural hair with leading an all natural lifestyle. I remember an interview posted here with the bf of a blogger where he called out natural girls who wear a lot of makeup. My thoughts were: what’s the big contradiction? does being natural mean u have to embrace a certain look or lifestyle? There’s no problem if that’s what u want but it’s nice to hear another perspective. I went natural because relaxers made my hair fall out not because i want to avoid all synthetic chemicals.

AC
AC
7 years ago

I prefer more natural products, they are just better for me and my hair. I’m beginning to become a DIYer, my hair seems to respond best to less chemicals which is a breakthrough for me. As far as my lifestyle goes no it isn’t completely natural but me going natural and making healthier product choices has opened my eyes to a lot so it appears everything happens for a reason 🙂

'Quel
'Quel
7 years ago

I never really understood how people equated “going natural” with “only using natural products” on your “natural” hair. I mean, other races don’t use chemicals in their hair and they don’t just stick to juices and berries to take care of their tresses. Why the deviation?? I enjoy using natural products when I’m able. But, I love my conditioner ‘Garnier Fructise Apricot & Moroccan Oil’ and I don’t care what the hell it has in it. It makes my hair smell and feel amazing. People just need to quit bein so extra. But, maybe there are just some hippies out… Read more »

kiyla
kiyla
7 years ago
Reply to  'Quel

Yesss quel. I wish i could like this 1000 times. The main reason I do not like talking to other naturals because they are so judgmental, like come on now its just hair if the hair is growing and healthy why does it matter what you use.

AVIA
AVIA
7 years ago

I am new to your website. And I love it!!!! I first came across your website because I was using Wen but found I could no longer afford the payments and wanted a replacement I could make myself while at the same time subtly teach my two girls to be proud and responsible of the hair they were born with. I agree with you in that a few planks in the fence need to be removed so a person can go back and forth. I wear my natural hair both curly and straight equally. I wash and deep condition on Sunday… Read more »

Mateland
7 years ago
Reply to  AVIA

I agree completely. I was trying to recommend some new all natural products by my sisters that I use and are coming out soon to the public that are good for rocking natural, curly, or flat ironed straight styles and all I got was negativity because it sounded like an ad. I mean name one product that you use that doesn’t advertise? We should uplift and support each other.

Mojo @ NaturalHairMojo.com

Great article! When I first went natural in 2008, I use some of EVERYTHING — VO5 and Aussie were my faves — in an effort to learn my hair’s preferences and to moisturize my newly rediscovered hair. A few things make me an advocate of mostly or all-natural products: 1) Base ingredients (mango butter, olive oil, etc) can be cheaper/last longer OR simply be of higher quality. 2) I began to experiment with making my own DCs, sealants and hair cleansers out of boredom and now it’s a lifestyle — I like knowing EXACTLY what’s in these potions and lotions… Read more »

Mateland
7 years ago

Thank you Mojo!

penelope
penelope
7 years ago

i like this article.
one addition,
people mistakenly believe that natural products cannot possibly be harmful…they forget natural sources are used for many chemicals, medicines and poisons. and i would argue that since natural products are not regulated like manufactured products (tolerable daily limits, safe dosage, exposure limits, long-term effects, drug interactions and other things measured in studies), it can be dangerous for a DIYer to use these at home. i’m talking less about oils and more about herbs. my pharmacology prof stressed a lot that natural=/=safe.
just a thought!

Chachamusicgirl
7 years ago

Sorry I may wear my hair natural but I will never give up my Bumble & Bumble or Redken to use coconut oil, aloe Vera or whatever the hell other people use. Hair products were invented to aid in the care of your hair. How do you really know that bananas, avocados and eggs are really repairing your damaged hair? I’d rather use a product actually formulated to be used in my hair. Just because something is found in nature does not make it safe or effective.

crossgirl
crossgirl
7 years ago

I prefer all natural mainly because I am actually allergic and react badly to many commercial products. ACV,castor oil, mango butter, avacado butter Original Moxie products and Shea Moisture products work for me because they are all natural AND gluten free!!! Believe it or not wheat protein and mineral oil based anything makes my face and scalp erupt into a winter wonderland!!! Let’s not EVEN talk about the Triethanolamine (sp) in ecostyler gel or many other gels for that matter!! For me those ingredients equal a terrible outbreak that can take weeks to remedy! NO THANKS!!!

joseph caron
6 years ago

Natural products are always good.

Mateland
6 years ago

Visit http://www.mysistersnatural.com for a line of 100% natural and chemical free hair care and skincare products made from certified organic coconut oil, blended with a carefully chosen selection of 100% pure essential oils.

www mysistersnatural.com

Thanks!

Mel Stevens
Mel Stevens
6 years ago

try using pro naturals hair repair system products. They are organic and designed to take care of damaged hair, and keep natural hair healthy too

Morgan
6 years ago

I actually just blogged about this. I used cones and sls for the first time in a while today and my hair is color damaged so my hair laughed at natural products. To me going natural means wearing your hair the way it grows out of your head but that doesn’t mean I will never straighten it again. This whole CG thing is becoming a bit cult like. Many followers, no questions. Check out my blog to see more about this topic!
Curlyheadedluck.wordpress.com
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/DSC_0211.JPG[/img]
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/IMG_20140212_134737.jpg[/img]

Yah
Yah
6 years ago

Thank you. I tried going completely natural for a while but my scalp was suffering. Itchy all the time and I tried every natural remedy google could find. In the end I relented and tried Organic Root Stimulator Olive Oil Hair Moslisturizer… Relief was pretty much instantaneous. Now I use a mixture of both and my hair and scald both look and feel natural.

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