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Brazilian Student Barred Entry to University for Wearing “Black Power” Natural Hair Style

Avatar • Mar 15, 2012

By Marques Travae of BlackWomenofBrazil.com

The secretary of state of the northeastern state of Maranhão is investigating an alleged crime of racism against a 19-year old woman. Ana Carolina Bastos (pictured above), a student of the Unidade Integrada Estado do Pará, on the outskirts of the capital city of São Luís, reported that she was barred from class by the director of the school on the first day of class.

According to Bastos, on February 23rd, the director, Socorro Bohatem, stopped her at the entrance of the school and told her that she was dressed in an “inadequate” way. Following an objection by Ana Carolina, who defended herself by saying that another young, (white) girl, wore a more low-cut dress than hers and was not barred, to which the director explained that she could not get into school because of the “black power” hairstyle. According to the student, the director was astonished by her choice of hairstyle, asked why she wore her hair “in that way” and told her leave the building. “The other student wore a top and a very low-cut dress. It was my style that didn’t please her. It was a case of racism. Later I found out that this was not the first time something like this happened”, said the student.


The local media get details about the incident from Ana Carolina Bastos

The student who continues to attend classes at the school where the incident occurred, filed a complaint with the police and now intends to enter a complaint against the director in the State Public Ministry of the State (MPE). The teacher also continued performing her duties as normal.


Ana Carolina Bastos speaks to the press about the incident and protest

In an official statement, the government replied that it “will hear the parties involved and take appropriate action.” On Friday of last week, dozens of students and members of the Movimento Negro held a protest carrying banners and signs against the action of the director in front of the school. To the students, the director said that she had not behaved in a racist manner. The local press tried to talk to the teacher, but the Secretary of Education reported that she could not give interviews in order to preserve the investigation process.

Racism is a crime

The young Ana Carolina is part of a group that plays African-oriented music in São Luís. Her dream is to be a sociologist so that she can fight for minorities in the capital city of Maranhão. “When I was barred, my sister cried and I was horrified. A lot of people were looking at me. It was a massacre. I wasn’t start anything. I go to school to be someone in life”, said the student. “I have a black identity and I will not change it,” she added.


Ana Carolina (in black top) with her sister

This is the second episode involving actions of racism in Maranhão in less than a year. In July, the rectory of the Federal University of Maranhão (UFMA) opened an administrative procedure to investigate a complaint that a teacher, José Cloves Verde Saraiva, had humiliated a student enrolled in the Chemical Engineering course, Nuhu Ayuba. So far, the investigation has not been completed.


Participants of public rally

According to Claudicea Durans of the group Raça e Classe do Maranhão (Race and Class of Maranhão):“black men and women have experienced situations of humiliation and racial slurs on a daily basis in different public spaces and these acts are often expressed in different ways: racist jokes, police beatings, moral and physical aggressions, that often go unreported because of the embarrassment, humiliation, sadness and frustration that its causes the people that denounce them”, but, Durans continues, “they must be reported in order to serve as examples and may in fact be punished because racism, according to Brazilian law, is a non-bailable and imprescriptible crime.”


Education without racism

Racism has different facets. The use of negative stereotypes and ridicule of physical characteristics and traits is another aspect of racism, which is in our analysis, at the same time silent, cruel and violent, it acts to deny the black identity, destroys cultural, historical, and physical values of this population, destroying their self-esteem.

The fact that this discriminatory attitude occurred in school leads us to reflect that this situation is common in the school environment and that the school has historically been an instrument of reproduction of dominant ideologies, and racism, one more element to ensure the oppression and exploitation of blacks.”

It’s crazy that discrimination against natural hair is so blatant and common in Brazil. Ladies, what are your thoughts?

Check out BlackWomenofBrazil.com for more coverage of black women living in Brazil.

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antoinette
8 years ago

May we repost a portion of this on our site, link it you here and tell our readers to finish reading it here?

R. Kahendi
8 years ago

Wow. This is absolutely ridiculous. What is wrong with people?

Barbara
Barbara
8 years ago

Obviously the school is in the wrong but the term “Black power hairstyle” has me thinking, if only more of us knew the powerful message in proudly rocking our crown.

Miranda
Miranda
8 years ago
Reply to  Barbara

Exactly! Obviously, the term, “Black Power” intimidates people. What a powerful message this young girl was sending, and she wasn’t even trying. She was just being herself!

Saf
Saf
8 years ago
Reply to  Barbara

It seems to me that the message from this incident is that if a natural hair style is seen as denoting ‘Black Power’ then a straightened hair style denotes the opposite, that is a ‘black lack of power’ or ‘white power over blacks’. The more I read stories like this, the more I realise that hair is really powerful people! How come it’s taken us black women so long to understand what’s at stake here? When we as a people wholesale reject our natural physical characteristics in the form of our hair, it’s a way of waving the white flag and… Read more »

anastasia
anastasia
8 years ago
Reply to  Saf

You hit the nail on the head!! My two cents: Power and blessings to these students for standing up for the basic rights! For over 5 decades Brazil has marketed to the international community a false message of “color-blindness” and unity among all Brazilians regardless of background. This was and remains a fairy tale. The irony: America is actually on its way to being quite similar with economic disparities increasing for all (wealth and thus power held by an elite few), particularly when comparing net worth btw minorities and whites, and the all to often utterances of a post-racial society which… Read more »

merry
merry
8 years ago
Reply to  Saf

this is why i believe so much in being natural.

and this is also why i never buy into that “i am not my hair” bs.

Lu
Lu
8 years ago
Reply to  Saf

Thank you ladies so much for this comment thread. I am someone who usually sees it as “just hair” not for a moment considering the greater implications of how “they” see it.

It is our crown and glory, isn’t it?

Hxyzyn
Hxyzyn
8 years ago
Reply to  Saf

“equivalent of planting the ‘white is right flag’ on top of our heads”–yes yes yes indeed. You could switch out ‘white is right flag’ with ‘black is wrong flag’ or ‘anything but black is right flag’ and it would apply even more widely. I know some black women though who rail against white oppression on the daily, yet they still feel shame about their natural hair. I’m like, okay I realize that you are against the “white is right” thing, but have you fully shed the “black is wrong” mentality? these women will quickly pull the “well other minorities have… Read more »

Hxyzyn
Hxyzyn
8 years ago
Reply to  Hxyzyn

oops, I meant *but still, even IF you aren’t trying to be white…*

Annie L.
Annie L.
8 years ago
Reply to  Saf

@Saf and Anastasia — just brava, ’tis all!

Lee
Lee
8 years ago
Reply to  Saf

You are brilliant! I wish more people understood this and rejected the self-hatred that we are all force fed.

earthichick
earthichick
8 years ago
Reply to  Saf

@saf…preach

Annie L.
Annie L.
8 years ago

I’m moved and very proud she and others had the courage to step forward and not swallow this barbarism, it takes guts. She fights for all of us who experience the shame and fury of ANY discrimination. I teared up when I read her sister cried. I can imagine her rage and helplessness at Ana Carolina being demeaned by some mental peon with quite possibly the Black grandmother, aunt, brother in the family tree but light enough to designate themselves White. Thank you for this story, very informative site, I’ll be following her progress.

Simone
Simone
8 years ago

I recently watched Henry Louis Gates documentary called “Black in Latin America: Brazil, a racial paradise? where the Dr. Gates explored the idea of Brazil being a racist free society…which is absolute bull! They want you to believe that abt Brazil but in actuality many black brazilians expressed feeling quite the opposite. Black brazilians say they are discriminated on a daily basis but it is covered up. This story is just another example of the racism that black brazilians go through regularly. Meanwhile if you go to Brazil you can experience this firsthand where there are minimal examples of black… Read more »

sosoulful_0125
sosoulful_0125
8 years ago
Reply to  Simone

I watched the same program and the whole series in Cuba and Mexico.

Jenn
Jenn
8 years ago
Reply to  Simone

I watched the same program, which happened to be my inspiration to officially stop straightening my hair and using chemicals. I always dreamed of living in either Cuba or Brazil, where the black experience was celebrated then years ago (at least 10) I was put on to the extreme racism in Brazil and was shocked. For all it’s beauty, Brazil is pretty backwards when it comes to race relations, and it reminds me of what goes on in America. When you have a nation that flourished off of racism and slavery, the powers that be will do all it takes… Read more »

Carla
Carla
8 years ago
Reply to  Simone

I too watched those documentaries by Dr. Gates. Very interesting and race relation issues such as these are not only found in Brazil, Cuba or the DR.

Richanna Dos Santos
Richanna Dos Santos
8 years ago
Reply to  Simone

I watched that show and I was born in Brasil. I think that Dr. Gates was only trying to show how different “black” is in Brasil. I think I’m black, but here I am considered bi-racial. Most people think I’m Mexican. Blacks in Brasil have a very hard time getting into universities as it is and this just makes having to go through the very very long process of the lottery- yes they use a lottery in Brasil to get into college- such a challenge that you almost just give up. She was accepted!!!! Praise God for that. Brasil only… Read more »

Naima
Naima
8 years ago

muchacha, i feel your pain. i have been aware of the struggles in brasil since i was a young girl. as a precocious student ‘looking for color everywhere’ i read much fiction and non fiction in translation from your country. masters and the slaves should be required reading in your country and everywhere africans have been enslaved. everywhere! we did not create this problem with blackness, our former masters did this out of the basest of human vices: greed,lust,envy, pride,sloth,vanity and malice. the mixed race brasilians and all of us in the americas need to understand that we were forced… Read more »

Sugabelly
Sugabelly
8 years ago

Brazil is always trying to claim it’s not a racist country. Big lie.

That name Nuhu Ayuba is Nigerian, I have to find out what happened to him.

Here it is! Apparently his professor gave him lower grades because he is dark skinned, called him a MONKEY and told him to go back to Africa and LIGHTEN HIS SKIN!

That is beyond sick.

http://translate.google.co.uk/translate?hl=en&sl=pt&u=http://www.overmundo.com.br/overblog/nuhu-ayuba-o-etnocentrismo-no-seculo-xxi&ei=9MRhT7PSMsKCgAeTpN2fAg&sa=X&oi=translate&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CEcQ7gEwCA&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dnuhu%2Bayuba%2Bmaranhao%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dsafari%26tbo%3Dd

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
8 years ago
Reply to  Sugabelly

Shocking in such a “non-racial” country, huh!!

That’s why I love the US. Black Americans do not pretend that this is a color blind country. Quite the opposite. By highlighting racism, you get rid of it. Pretending that racism doesn’t exist, only allows it to flourish undercover.

Francine
Francine
8 years ago

Because I live in Miami, a multicultural hub where many cultures converge in the US it is clear that there is insufficient comprehension of black culture and a lot of scare tactics prevail. I get the sense this director knows nothing of “black power”, “black history” and “black culture” and is simply parroting stereotypes received from others. This happens a great deal, even in Miami, there was an elementary school which had “No dreadlocks” on its school policy and the principle was reading the list when he saw me in the audience wearing my well kept locs. He read the… Read more »

Mai
Mai
8 years ago
Reply to  Francine

Unfortunately locs are one of those things. I find that loose natural hair gets a better rap than locs. I’ve never received a negative comment about my natural hair from anyone other than my family (ironically), they have been pretty positive. Most people that ask me about my hair are more so confused and want to know how I care for it, but everyone knows how to “care” for locs. They think people with locs don’t wash their hair, they think it’s unkempt, they think palm rolling is the only technique. It’s unfortunate. I live near Philadelphia and there are… Read more »

nelle
nelle
8 years ago

This is horrible and not new or unique to Brasil. I hope this young woman finds justice. My comment is also for this blog http://www.blackwomenofbrazil.com you just introduced us to. I am HOOKED! I can’t stop reading the articles. I absolutely love the perspective from Whitneys death, to the Oscars, to hair and role models. Just wanted to say thanks for sharing an awesome blog from the diaspora.

Carla
Carla
8 years ago
Reply to  nelle

I agree! This is a great blog — one that I will keep following up with 🙂

Melissa
8 years ago

WOW!! so this goes to show that this BS happens everywhere, I am so tired of hearing that the US is the only place that is racist. WOW!! beautiful Brazil, a place of cultral has racism…This type of stuff happen everywhere!!

I am glad this is getting some type of attention, I pray justice will prevail for her and the people that are affected by this.

hassan
hassan
8 years ago

She’s a beautiful young lady and I glad she was not deterred or intimidated by her ignorant professor!

Henk Piek
Henk Piek
8 years ago

I feel sorry for the Ana’s pain but at the same time I am proud of her: Well done girl!!! You are not only beautiful, you are pure and brave as well. Your assertive action has gotten you the respect of many and it wipes away all the unnecessary pain that man caused you. That ‘educator’ is a retard, he got stuck in the fifties of last century, or should I say in the fifties of the nineteenth century???!!! I also find it a shame that some people evaluate, appreciate, judge en reject others on the basis of skin color.… Read more »

eme
eme
8 years ago
Reply to  Henk Piek

What do u by colorblind? If u notice the complexion of your wife and daughter, doesn’t that mean that you are not colorblind?

eme
eme
8 years ago
Reply to  eme

Meant to say “what do u mean by colorblind”

Siri
Siri
8 years ago
Reply to  eme

I think he is saying that he does not base his opinions soley upon someone’s race or complexion, but instead he bases his opinions on a person’s actions or personality. I would consider myself colorblind too. It is a common expression.

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  eme

You’re being facetious

eme
eme
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

Believe it or not, but I have actually never heard of the word used outside of a medical context, but thank you for explaining Siri.

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  eme

Really?! it’s a fancy word for smart*ss so how is it a medical term?

Aisha
Aisha
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

She meant she did not know of “colorblind” outside of a medical term. Please remember that this site attracts readers from all over the world.

eme
eme
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

Relax, sweetheart. I meant the word colorblindness. Read the entire before you start typing.

eme
eme
8 years ago
Reply to  eme

I don’t mean you Aisha :).

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  eme

Read the entire? perhaps you should follow your own advice?

cygnet
cygnet
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

Since Eme’s original question was “What do you mean by ‘colorblind’ ”, and she thanked Siri for the explanation, it appears that “colorblind”, rather than “facetious” is the word she associated with a medical condition. I’m not throwing you shade, EG; human nature being what it is, it’s entirely possible, probable even, that there are some who know full well what Henk Piek meant and still echo Eme’s question from the same point of view you thought she had, in which case, I agree with you. Eme, you’re correct. In addition to Siri’s explanation about choosing to see the whole person rather… Read more »

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  cygnet

thanks for the explanation…:-)

eme
eme
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

So glad you finally understand

Circusmum
8 years ago

I like to wear my hair in a natural fro. I was wearing a wash and go style and one of the black employees asked me why I didn’t do my hair anymore.
I’ve had loads of comments from colleagues asking why I don’t wear my hair long and straight. I spend a lot of time and attention on my hair so it’s a shame people see it as unproffesional and unkempt. We should be allowed to wear our hair in our natural states without causing controversy!!

Deidre
Deidre
8 years ago

Pure ignorance fed by racism, deception and a superiority complex. Denying someone an education because they wear their hair in the texture it naturally grows out of their scalp? Sounds like the person who did this to this young lady needs to be delivered from the same mentality that soooooo many other people the world over have concerning African textured hair. That mindset is that caucasians set the standard of beauty and the more closer you are to them in appearance and hair texture you are right and accepted and the further you are is color, appearance and hair texture… Read more »

Telly
Telly
8 years ago

Afro-Cubans, Afro-Brazilians and etc. are constantly dealing with racial discrimination and stigmas of the “lighter skinned” ignorance of their people. It remains constant in all cultures, whether it’s hair texture, or the color of the skin. Unfortunately, this is nothing new I’m not surprised. What I am surprised about is the fact this professor is still allowed to teach after this incident occurred. Whether they’re “investigating,” or trying to figure out how to ease their way of this situation. The professor should be suspended without pay, it was disrespectful. I believe they go easy on the people that commit these… Read more »

eme
eme
8 years ago

I am just waiting for the apologists from the Vogue Italia post to jump in and make excuses for the professor and/or blame the victim. Here are some comments that I anticipate: 1) How do you know it was because of your race/hairstyle? It could just be because you were late/disruptive/your outfit was actually distracting 2) Girl, get over yourself/grow a thicker skin/don’t be so damned sensitive/stop crying wolf 3) Yo, that girl’s hair is a hot mess. I would have kicked her a** out the classroom too 4) Some variation of “we, as black people need to stop___”. Could… Read more »

Sorry not the same
Sorry not the same
8 years ago
Reply to  eme

I think the Vogue Italia piece was different. Fashion is perceptive, so that post had many comments that perceived the fashion in the editorial to be either harmless or harmful. Being banned from a school based on wearing your hair texture is different. She was wearing a braidout or twistout which looked lovely, there were no skittles or candy bars in her hair (which in my opinion is weird and not appropriate for anything other than Halloween regardless of race, sorry that’s how I feel about that). So why would anyone make comments like the ones that you think you… Read more »

lindy
lindy
8 years ago
Reply to  eme

THANK YOU@eme: I couldnt even respond because the responses of the posters were so idiotic.Black people obviously do not know when they are being insulted,STILL!I have seen spreads on harajuku girls,goths,etc…those spreads were full of admiration, an homage-the vogue spread was MOCKERY AND DISDAIN! Look at the models facial expressions and body language! Yet some people were laughing and saying it wasnt racist because among other reasons they used mostly white models- You bet they did; to confuse the stupid! but the intent was still loud and clear. The big question is what gives vogue and other racists(such as in… Read more »

Sorry not the same
Sorry not the same
8 years ago
Reply to  lindy

To me, black people who feel like that are the only ones affected by racism are narcissistic and live in a small world. Sorry but a lot of other races are discriminated upon. Was there not a Holocaust 60 years ago, and there are still people who make Holocaust jokes and find them funny. How many times do I hear people joking about Mexicans mowing lawns. Arabs are racially profiled too. Everyone likes to joke that all Asians look alike (I’ve lived in Japan and my best friend is Chinese, there is a distinct difference). So no, black people are… Read more »

sasha
sasha
8 years ago
Reply to  lindy

That’s the reality of the post racism role we live in. Damn if you do damn if you don’t.

joe
joe
8 years ago

people are afraid of the original black race, Black power for life, we rule, I don’t understand why some whit people are afraid of the afro, so strange I don’t see black people afraid of their blond hair.

Luciano
Luciano
8 years ago

I think I don’t have much to say for myself, as I am a man, but I do expect justice in this case (and many like it) to recognize a clear racist situation, and the teacher and institution get properly penalized. I give all my thoughts and hopes to Ana Carolina, and I pray that the day we’ll all see ourselves as one comes soon.

krmlwd
krmlwd
8 years ago

SMH. In other words the simple fact that she exists, that she was born is a sign of black power? Are you kidding. Its hair and hair can be styled in any manner and interpretations vary based on the person roc’n it. The fact that ‘the powers that be’ took a movement of acceptance as being intimidating or a challenge to them says alot. Stuff like this makes my heart hurt. And the teacher has the nerve to say she wasn’t being racist. These type of remarks make me realize that people are throwing around heavy terms without realizing what… Read more »

Saf
Saf
8 years ago
Reply to  krmlwd

Yes, I do think that for white racists, the simple fact that she exists, that people looking like her haven’t been completely bred out or exterminated is a sign of black power and a direct defiance of their white supremacist agenda.

To such people, if blacks are no longer a source of free labour, then they shouldn’t exist at all let alone prosper and the fact that they continue to do so constitutes some kind of threat to them.

merry
merry
8 years ago

very proud of this woman for standing up for herself, and her people.

sending good thoughts her way that she’ll be readmitted to her school so that she’ll continue her studies.

Aisha
Aisha
8 years ago

This is really upsetting, and I’m glad these students are fighting for what’s right. A lot of people think those who have looser textured curls (such as the young lady pictured) have it easier in terms of acceptance. However, in many cases, any hair that isn’t straight is looked down upon. A biased person isn’t going to make the distinction between 3b, 4a, etc.

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  Aisha

That’s a braid-out. People with looser curls do have it easier because type 3 hair has a lot more shine to it than type 4 without any product in it. Kimmayutube has a head full of healthy hair, but it does not have the shine of a Mahagonyknots, but guess who’a hair is longer. People naturally like shiny things, and that includes hair.

Aisha
Aisha
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

It’s a braid out, but her hair still appears to be a looser texture. As for the “shiny hair” aspect, I think you missed the point. Someone who hates curls does not care if type 3 has a little more shine than type 4. They hate any and all curls period.

Lela7
Lela7
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

In Brazil, it appears they don’t like any kind of curl 3a, 4b whatever and that is the point they are trying to make, because any kind of curl suggests african DNA!

If u look at the black brazilian teacher who was discriminated because of hair — her hair was type 3 curly and shiny.

Also, how could you possible know thats a braid out? That could easily be her natural curl pattern.

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  Lela7

I’m trying to see your point, on the one hand you say that the teacher who discriminated against her has type 3 hair, then you say that they don’t differentiate between hair type.… I disagreed with Aisha because people do care about curl pattern, and hair type. I’m sure you’ve heard the phrase ‘well, some people have the type of hair to go natural, some do not’. Who do you think falls in the ‘do not’ bucket? To answer your question: how do I know that her hair is a braid out? I guess the same way you don’t know that… Read more »

Lela7
Lela7
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

Yeah, but you’re thinking like and American, not a brazilian, who not the same as you! Brazilians like straight and nothing else it seems. We are not talking about your poeple (who I assume are americans). They don’t like any natural hair except type 1. Stop acting as if your american experience is universal. I am from Europe and I asure you, it is not. I’m assuming your experience of who has it easier hair waise is based on your american experience which is hardly universally applicable. I never said I don’t differentiate between hair type?! What are you talking about?… Read more »

Sass' n Curlz
8 years ago

This is in fact very sad and unfortunate. I will never be able to understand why some people in Latin America countries are so ashamed of their African ancestry. Much love and support to the students who are rallying against their director’s ignorance.

Aiych
Aiych
8 years ago
Reply to  Sass' n Curlz

“I will never be able to understand why some people in Latin America countries are so ashamed of their African ancestry” Um it’s not that hard to understand. Latin American countries with black populations also have a long history of discrimination, racism, colonialism and hatred of blacks, blackness and Africanness. Also, in Brazil, since many people there want to act like there is no racism, racial inequalities and the legacy of slavery never really got addressed in a major public manner like it did in the US with the Civil Rights movement. It’s pretty obvious where the self-hate comes from… Read more »

Annie L.
Annie L.
8 years ago
Reply to  Aiych

Relax! “I will never be able to understand” is a common expression used to denote sympathy, not a literal statement necessitating a clarification of race-relations in various countries.

It seemed to be a genuine outpouring of sympathy for Ana Carolina and condemnation of the racist views in Latin America and not one deserving of a flip, derisive reply.

reginho
reginho
8 years ago

racism crimes are exploding in brazil

reginho
reginho
8 years ago
Reply to  reginho

racial crimes are expanding in brazil

Thokozile
Thokozile
8 years ago
Reply to  reginho

racial crimes are expanding everywhere..

Fernando
Fernando
8 years ago
Reply to  Thokozile

Corretíssimo. O pior é que isso não é típico do Brasil, é típico de todos os países do mundo.

merry
merry
8 years ago
Reply to  reginho

exploding makes sense too.

Francesca
Francesca
8 years ago

Sadly from experience as a woman living in brazil, its not just the hair , its an over all discrimination against “difference”. The typical we want lighter skinned , skinny , sliky hair especially hair, unlike in America where you can basically wear whatever hair you want, down here its almost like its a sin :

Cara
Cara
8 years ago

Another hearbreaking act of racism: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/08/us-crime-florida-neighborhoodwatch-idUSBRE82709M20120308

A young black boy was shot to death by a neighborhood crime watchman.

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
8 years ago
Reply to  Cara

Just read about this. Sickening. And of course the shooter is still free.

Lysheba
Lysheba
8 years ago

I’m just wondering why these narrow minded racist-as-a-mug Brazilians don’t see themselves for the euro trash wannabe whiteman d*** suckers that they are. I’m a little on the ragey side today.

Sara
Sara
8 years ago
Reply to  Lysheba

You’re a little on the narrow minded side today, I’d say. Just like the teacher who discriminated the girl.

bohemianNuQ
bohemianNuQ
8 years ago

From the Melting Pot into the fire. Just when we think America has issues, another country makes them look like racist sissies. All I can say is God Bless America & the wonderful stacks of papers called the Constitution and Amendments.

Lela7
Lela7
8 years ago
Reply to  bohemianNuQ

Yeah, because the US Constitution has a long history of protecting minorities, women, gays, the native population, immigrants etc.

Oh yeah, it doesn’t.

sasha
sasha
8 years ago
Reply to  Lela7

In some ways it is a blessing that there were laws against the “supposed mixing of the races” and laws that defined “black.” Why? Because you can organize and better address it. It has a name so to speak.

kalexa1
kalexa1
5 years ago
Reply to  sasha

I guess the male black population of present day didn’t get that memo.

Fernando
Fernando
8 years ago

O que mais me espanta é que o Brasil é metade negro. Como pode algumas pessoas pensarem dessa forma? Ridículo.

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  Fernando

English! otherwise you come off as a coward who is afraid of the response that he may receive, so he is hinding behind his spanish posts.

Lu
Lu
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

Orrrrrr… you could run the comment through Google Translate. This is what he typed:
What amazes me most is that Brazil is half black. How can some people think this way? Ridiculous.

Lu
Lu
8 years ago
Reply to  Lu

And its Portugeuse not Spanish

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  Lu

Why should I have to go through that trouble? obviously this person took the time to read the comments in english, yet decided to post in spanish.

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

EG,

Brazilians speak Portuguese, not Spanish.

jack_flash
jack_flash
7 years ago
Reply to  EG

By writing in his native tongue, any lack of fluency in the translation might be picked up on by another reader, allowing subtleties to be expressed more accurately. He KNOWS his Portuguese is sufficient.

merry
merry
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

oh please. put it through google translator and stop assuming people want to be crude and rude and ignorant — like you.

anyway, it’s portuguese.

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  merry

Oh please’ yourself. As far as ignorant.….riggghhhhhtttt, like I can’t say the same about you. How about you get over yourself first, then i’ll follow your lead.

Oh, and I don’t give a damn what it is..

jack_flash
jack_flash
7 years ago
Reply to  EG

Nor we for you.

Annie L.
Annie L.
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

“O que mais me espanta é que o Brasil é metade negro. Como pode algumas pessoas pensarem dessa forma? Ridículo.” “What amazes me most is that Brazil is half Black. How can some people think this way? Ridiculous.” Concordo Fernando! It’s not SPANISH- it’s PORTUGUESE! And this being an article from the PORTUGUESE-speaking nation of Brazil would make the poster’s PORTUGUESE-language post relevant! From what I’ve read BGLH has French, Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic and Dutch-speaking followers among many others so it makes sense that a site with a multicultural viewership have multilingual interaction! Those who speak/read other languages may recognize,… Read more »

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  Annie L.

I know what it wasn’t, and that is english. Yes the article came from a non-english site, but it was translated because regardless of the diversity of the readers, everything on this site is posted in.….you guessed it, english. This may be a global village, but there is a reason why the saying ‘when in Rome’ has managed to stand the test of time. It is up to the person who posted the statement to translate it if they want to interact. Lastly, considering that I have not attacked every single poster, than I guess I am safe. Thanks for… Read more »

reginho
reginho
8 years ago

Brazil is the country the has more black people out of entire Africa. Alguns casos dos últimos três meses que viraram headlines: - No supermercado uma pessoa que estava em seu carro foi levada para uma sala reservaa porque eles não admitiam uma pessoa negra ter um carro como aquele. Achavam que estava roubando. - Garoto africano foi colocado para fora de um restaurante enquanto esperava pelos pais. “Pensaram que fosse um menino de rua” - Garota foi repreendida na escola em que trabalhava e a diretora ordenou que a mesma prendesse os cabelos ( Natural Hairstyle ) - Advogada condenada a… Read more »

ADMIN PLEASE VISIT THIS THREAD
ADMIN PLEASE VISIT THIS THREAD
8 years ago

I love this site, I really do, but it seems to have been invaded by a very ignorant and angry troll.

Blessing
Blessing
8 years ago

I am totally encouraged by this young lady!!!!

@EG you really need to tone down. In almost every comment you made u seemed to have deviated from the real TOPIC. What’s up boo?

I think with the amount of energy u have, u could use it in a more positive manner that actually contributes positively towards improving our society, educating others, etc

I so agree that this is a universal site so this comment comes all the way from South Africa baby!!!!!

Selina
Selina
8 years ago

This is totally true, I have been talking about this for the last few years. I worked at Disney and in the department where they created highschool musical. A top executive there, white, blonde female who worked on casting Highschool Musical 1 and 2. Cast fat girls in most of the shows that were shot in Tornonto. Or she cast young girls with braid extensions. On one show she cast several fat young black girls, around the ages of 8 and 9. When I asked her why she discriminated against young black girls by doing so, she said she was… Read more »

earthichick
earthichick
8 years ago
Reply to  Selina

plz tell me where you got that first pic, would love to put it on my wall

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
8 years ago
Reply to  Selina

Cynthia Bailey (from Real Housewives of Atlanta) is the last model, correct? Short hair suits her face.

Nicki
Nicki
8 years ago

Im sad this happened to this girl in brazil but i still think that some of us black people need to release that there are others who go through more racial abuse than us such as muslims and jews. Even in England when i live my friends who are eastern european and irish have gone through shocking racist abuse that i’ve never even suffered so i cant even blame white people because i know that just like us we can discriminate against someone the same race as us.I also think that just because someone relaxes or weaves their have does… Read more »

jack_flash
jack_flash
7 years ago
Reply to  Nicki

When I was in Thailand, I chatted with a young woman who did modeling as a side job. She was planning on surgery to ’round’ her eyes. Naturally, I assumed that this was a nefarious cultural influence. She argued persuasively that it was nothing of the kind. Thailand was never a colony of any European power, nor was its pop culture infiltrated by any foreign influences, excepting Chinese and Indian. (Which makes sense, because the Thai are a thorough and ancient mixing of both peoples.) It was just fashion. Lots of plastic surgeons to make the lady boys, who now… Read more »

kalexa1
kalexa1
5 years ago
Reply to  Nicki

Unfortunately it goes deeper than your ‘explanation’ and has deep roots. Check history books; watch 12 Years a Slave; talk to people outside of your usual circle; watch documentaries; go Google it! If only it was as simple as you think it is. Sigh.

Thelly
Thelly
8 years ago

omg! This makes me to do not want to go down to Brazil due to DISRESPECT! *SHRUG*

Terrill
8 years ago

I don’t understand what they mean by ‘Black Power’ hairstyle. We don’t have any power…We’re the most marginalized people on this planet.

jack_flash
jack_flash
7 years ago
Reply to  Terrill

Hairstyles transmitted to Brazil from the States, in the wake of the protest at the Mexico City Olympics. Happened at the same time that Che was stirring the pot all over Sud America. So, the one became identified with the other, more so in the minds of Establishment types than among the fashion forward.

My guess is that the school administrator is in his fifties or older. Everybody tends to see the world through the lens of their own youth.

Perki
Perki
8 years ago

I’m a white british girl and I hate straighteners. I own a pair but use them very infrequently. I don’t even have curly hair but love far more to see people of all ethnicities let their hair go about the way it’s meant to. I love hair like this girl has and to me it has more life and vibrancy than anything else. History aside, and I style my own upon my own celtic background (wild as it grows), it just looks so much nicer. Free hair represents a free spirit and should not be judged as some sort of… Read more »

salina
salina
8 years ago

This is one of those moments I would have been so shocked I honestly don’t know what I would’ve said. I would have been so stunned.

Grasi
Grasi
8 years ago

The situation here in Brazil may be even worse than this, I can imagine what Ana felt and I’m not shocked because that’s the reality for natural hair here. I envy(in a good way ^^) you American girls who can rock your natural more freely. Ana was probably wearing an afro( called “black power” here) and you can’t wear an fro on a typical Brazilian city without getting a lot of attention and the “side eye”(I hope I wrote it right!). The most gentle people might say “oh! that’s cool, you’re ACCEPTING your hair”, that’s the very word they use “accept”,… Read more »

Torie Amza
Torie Amza
5 years ago
Reply to  Grasi

This is so sad to hear, especially considering that you have a larger population of Blacks than in America. Yes, God has helped us to make much progress, but we are still fighting. I pray for the victory for my Black ppl all around the world!

Keenan
Keenan
4 years ago
Reply to  Torie Amza

We’ve made no progress. I’ve studied in Brazil and while the racism is obvious and problematic, the people are lot more socially & politically aware.

typo
typo
8 years ago

what idiot made a hairstyle part of the black movement.. whites were smart man they just used clothing.. and now they can wear their hair any way they want..

rother umoja
8 years ago

would love to interview you on our radio show “speaking to harmony”

trackback

[…] and unattractive. There are countless stories of people being denied employment and even an education because they chose to rock their natural coils. Of course, this pushback against natural hair […]

jack_flash
jack_flash
7 years ago

A single episode lead you to conclude that “discrimination against natural hair is so blatant and common in Brazil.” Stereotype much?

kalexa1
kalexa1
5 years ago
Reply to  jack_flash

Actually if you care to look/google/research there are sadly many many many such examples of varying types that all point to the same thing. I’m guessing you want to believe racism just doesn’t happen, along with stereotyping much?

kalexa1
kalexa1
5 years ago
Reply to  jack_flash

Actually.…just scroll down and read Grasi’s comment. She appears to be a native of Brazil. Go argue with her.

Elaine A. Primerano
7 years ago

I am so proud of this young girl for wanting to wear her own hair style. Here in America, Blacks are always “hating on Whitey” and yet the black girls are constantly wearing “weaves of Japanese hair and also blond long hair weaves”. If they hate “whitey” so much then why do they want to look like white girls that have “long natural hair and blonde hair”?

I fully back this young woman that wants to stay “true” to her culture and nationality.

Kaia
Kaia
7 years ago

Another Hispanic bimbo on here hating on black folks, lol. WHat else is new? Please leave before you make yourself look even more stupid. BUH-BYE!

Torie Amza
Torie Amza
5 years ago

Whites are not the only ones who have long hair, or blonde hair. Black aboriginals in Australia have naturally blonde hair, as do some of African descent her in the United States. Also, women of ALL races have long hair.

kalexa1
kalexa1
5 years ago

There in America FAR MORE black women and girls are embracing their natural afro hair and rejecting white/european/asian hair types of any form in recognition of white stereotypes of beauty. Obviously you only see what you choose to see. Not ALL black women want to look ‘white’!

Danny
Danny
7 years ago

Really, this is a hairstyle that appears in fashion ads, on runways, movies, television. People of other skin tones and countries also wear their hair, if they have enough of it and they can get it to grow and shape it like this, will attempt it to look this good. It is a young look, stylish, hip, very free, very now. Should not be a distraction, unless you like looking at beautiful things instead of studying. How backwards of them. I would have expected more enlightened attitudes, but I guess they are still in the 19th century. Old paradigms.

Nemanja
7 years ago

Nice looking.

Robi
Robi
6 years ago

It’s especially crazy because Brazil has the 2nd largest population of blacks outside of the predominately black countries in Africa.

Torie Amza
Torie Amza
5 years ago

I’m so tired of my ppl having to go through this!!! Enough is enough!! Our ppl are beautiful and strong! Black is beautiful!

Queen Mennon
Queen Mennon
4 years ago

this is why the government was so desperate to stop the “black power” movement in america before it spread to the rest of the world. too late.

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