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7 Ways You Waste Money When Buying Beauty Products

Avatar • Mar 6, 2012


Via The Beauty Brains

Did you know you are probably spending much more money on beauty products than you need to? You are if you are engaging in any of the following seven habits that drain your money without significantly improving your beauty.

1. Buying expensive beauty products

While it may be true in some industries that price equals quality, in the cosmetic industry it’s not. The amount that is charged for a beauty product has little to do with the amount of money it takes to produce the product. Price also doesn’t have any correlation with effectiveness. $10 moisturizing creams are just as good (and often better) than $300 moisturizing creams. Salon hair products are no better than grocery store brands.

Tip – Price does not equal quality. Avoid the highest priced cosmetics.

2. Buying the same product for more

Did you know that sometimes manufacturers will take nearly the same formula and sell it under a different brand name for more money? Sure, they change the product color, fragrance and packaging but they don’t change the ingredients that actually make the product work. For example, Pantene and Herbal Essences shampoos are essentially the same formulas. Check the ingredient lists.

Tip – Brands can fool your brain. Compare ingredient lists and go with the less expensive product.

3. Buying from multi-level marketers

While you might have a friendly relationship with your door to door Arbonne sales person, don’t think that you’re getting some unique technology that will make your skin better than any other product. It won’t. The beauty products sold directly to you are more expensive and definitely not better than products you can buy in the store.

Tip – Make your skin care & make-up purchases at a store.

4. Buying beauty products from “experts”

While dermatologists know how to treat skin diseases and their advice in this area need not be questioned, they don’t necessarily know the best skin care products to use. Dermatologists often sell their names to a product and don’t actually have much involvement in the development. They also stand to make money if you buy the line that they sell. Why would a dermatologist need to supplement their income by selling beauty products? Don’t they make enough money treating patients?

And while stylists know how to style hair, they do not necessarily know about hair products. Be skeptical of any advice they give you about what products to use. They learn about products from the marketing department of salon brands and also make a commission on products you buy from them. When they bash products like Pantene, they do so without any real evidence to back up their claims.

Tip – Don’t buy beauty products from doctor’s offices or salons.

5. Falling for Fear

Have things you read on the Internet made you afraid of products with sulfates, talc, parabens, propylene glycol, etc.? Well, you are avoiding perfectly good, safe and effective products. There is no scientific evidence that suggests beauty products sold in the United States, Canada, EU or Japan are unsafe. There is also no evidence that the purported “natural” alternatives are safer or better for you or the environment.

Tip – Don’t spend extra money on products claimed to be “natural”.

6. Buying Products that Don’t Work

Many products out there promise to “solve” your beauty problems. But the truth is there are many problems for which scientists just haven’t figured out solutions. The following are the top beauty product types that are practically ineffective for solving the problem.

1. Cellulite reduction – No cream or lotion will fix this problem
2. Hair growth products – Products mostly don’t work
3. Shave minimizing lotions – They do not slow hair growth
4. Tattoo removal creams – They don’t work.
5. Most miracle wrinkle creams – Some ingredients work but most don’t.
6. Split end repair – Nothing can repair split ends except a hair cut.

Tip – Don’t buy products that promise to solve problems that haven’t been solved.

7. Buying Products that Claim to Beautify from Within

If you are spending money on health food supplements that promise to give you better hair and skin, you’re wasting your money. There is no evidence that a health food supplement is going to have any positive effect on your skin or hair. While it may sound promising and make sense, the scientific support is not there. The other problem is that at least in the US, limited governmental regulation of the food supplement industry allows them to make almost any beauty claim without requiring proof.

Tip – Avoid any product that claims to beautify your skin from within.

Without specialized knowledge, it’s easy to be taken in by glitzy advertising, friendly sales people, and products that sound too good to be true. If you can remember that price and performance are not related in the beauty product market, you can save yourself lots of money without negatively impacting your appearance. In fact, with the money you save on beauty products, you can go get a nice pair of cute shoes.

What are you going to spend your extra money on now that you aren’t wasting it on overpriced beauty products? Leave a comment below.

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[…] Ways You Waste Money When Buying Beauty Products via Black Girl Long Hair […]

Azie
Azie
8 years ago

I take issue with number five on this list. I struggled with eczema my whole life, slathering myself with steroidal creams and the like to rid myself of the discomfort. It was only when I switched to all natural skin care, specifically getting rid of products with sulfates, that my skin recovered naturally. I have been sulfate free for 10 years, and I have not had a breakout on my skin, except for a few times when I used bathroom soaps at public places. Also I got rid of dandruff issues and my hair is much healthier. Beauty products do… Read more »

mangomadness
mangomadness
8 years ago
Reply to  Azie

There is pretty much no process by which the safety of new chemicals in beauty products is measured. So you do have to look into these things on your own. ”

+1

Tai
Tai
8 years ago
Reply to  Azie

+100- I have scalp psoriasis and sulfates made my skin irritable to the point of bleeding. I think it’s a good point that one should not simply avoid these ingredients because of fear mongering but they are not necessarily “harmless” either. It’s important to do your own research and know what exactly you are putting in/on your body.

Coily Africana
Coily Africana
8 years ago
Reply to  Tai

I agree,any harsh sulfate heavy product is guaranteed to send my psoriasis into over drive, especially my skin psoriasis. The same goes with my scalp psoriasis with the exception that it cannot stand any of the natural butters(most oils included)coming in direct contact with it.

Tai, are on the forum? I am interested in finding out how you manage your scalp psoriasis, can we compare notes:)

Afrodite
Afrodite
8 years ago
Reply to  Azie

Consign — I switched to natural products and my hair is a whole lot better for it. Some people can handle parabens and sulfates, some can’t. Just like our hair we are individual. I also have a differing opinion on #7. While a product can’t necessarily give you beauty from within what you put in your body (vitamins and nutrients) is as important as what you put on your head.

hyspin
hyspin
8 years ago
Reply to  Azie

I have Eczema as well as for your breakouts for using soap from public places I mentioned this same problem to my doctor and dermatologist they both mention to avoid Antibacterial soap. Once I avoid that my issues was a non-issue. I am lucky on the sulphate front. But I having serious problem with sunscreens so far all of them (sunscreens, physical sunblocks, mineral sunscreen, sensitive skin sunscreens, children’s sunblock, zinc oxide as the man ingredient) The only luck I have had so far is MAC concealer SPF 30. I am checking out Vanicream sunblock as my last try. Because… Read more »

Loo
Loo
8 years ago
Reply to  Azie

+1

mangomadness
mangomadness
8 years ago

I agree with everything but #5. I think that natural products (with little/no dangerous chemicals as ingredients) are the way to go. I simply cannot justify exposing myself to them now that I know better. Besides, I really like “natural” and/or DIY beauty products.

P.S. To assess the safety of a product, I consult Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep® Cosmetics Database (http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/).

jade
8 years ago
Reply to  mangomadness

co-sign

Carla
Carla
8 years ago

I question #1. I have used dirt cheap products that were golden and more expensive brand products that were crap. I’ve always experience the other way around — more often than not. I will NOT find a foundation for my skin that 1. matches my color and undertone and 2. that wont break me out at a drugstore. The only foundation I could use is $40. I would buy cheaper if I could. The same is true with hair and skin care products. It can go either day depending on the product, the brand, the ingredients. “Tip – Price does… Read more »

Coily Africana
Coily Africana
8 years ago

I agree,any harsh sulfate heavy product is guaranteed to send my psoriasis into over drive, especially my skin psoriasis. The same goes with my scalp psoriasis with the exception that it cannot stand any of the natural butters(most oils included)coming in direct contact with it.

Tai, are on the forum? I am interested in finding out how you manage your scalp psoriasis, can we compare notes:)

SistaNaps
SistaNaps
8 years ago

Where does this leave products like Miss Jessie’s, which have an astronomical price tag yet a devoted audience base? Others have said they get similar results from cheaper products with similar ingredients.

African Violet
African Violet
8 years ago
Reply to  SistaNaps

It leaves her with her pockets lined. 🙂

merry
merry
8 years ago

5. Falling for Fear Have things you read on the Internet made you afraid of products with sulfates, talc, parabens, propylene glycol, etc.? Well, you are avoiding perfectly good, safe and effective products. There is no scientific evidence that suggests beauty products sold in the United States, Canada, EU or Japan are unsafe. There is also no evidence that the purported “natural” alternatives are safer or better for you or the environment. Tip – Don’t spend extra money on products claimed to be “natural”. ——— sorry but this is a load of crap! i just don’t know where to begin… for starters, just… Read more »

Barbara
Barbara
8 years ago
Reply to  merry

ICAM, I read this and went WTH?

Aby
Aby
8 years ago

It’s amazing though that each day, there are thousands of product reviews and it’s kind of irritating sometimes for those of us in a different continent. I haven’t seen a quarter of all the products which are popular on the hair care forums. I think this has helped me stick with what i have at my disposal.

merry
merry
8 years ago
Reply to  Aby

so, what do you suggest a blog/online magazine based in the u.s. do?

maybe there are tons of product reviews based on products you don’t have access to because the reviewers are in the u.s. (or wherever) and just review what they have access to via the internet, local stores, etc.

what would you review if you had a blog? i imagine things you found in your area.

i doubt anyone is intentionally slighting anyone. to me, the owner of this blog makes great efforts to include black women from around the world in the blog.

michelle morris
michelle morris
8 years ago

I agree with the information above to wide extent. I am recently natural and still searching for products that would work for my hair …so far I have invested in some pretty pricey products, but based on recommendation have gone to using what’s in my kitchen. I find that my cheaper connoctions are doing better than the more expensive and they really don’t require much effort. I also find that I have no bad reaction to sulphate and so believe me this saves me a bundle as I buy inexpensive shampoo and conditoner for curly hair from Tresemme which gives… Read more »

neochasez
neochasez
8 years ago

Three words: Look up “Parabens”

chouxchoux
chouxchoux
8 years ago

tresemme, nexxus, and someother brands have come out with products with PEC technology that bonds split ends back together. BGLH just posted an article about it complete with a video showing what pec technology can do several days ago. in fact, I’m in the process of trying out one of the products now, so far, with good results.

binks
binks
8 years ago

Honestly I am saving money by going to independent shops/sellers for my beauty needs or making something myself so I rarely head to the store now and that had saved me so much needed $ plus I have the added benefit that the stuff I am using for my skin/body is natural with no fillers/chemicals and it’s working for me.

Rukiyat G.
Rukiyat G.
8 years ago

Tip — This article is only 50% credible.

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