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Ebony // Natural Hair Style Icon

Avatar • Dec 8, 2011

*Prepared for BGLH by Meosha Tall of 1MeNaturally

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Introduce yourself!
E:
My name is Ebony and I’m from Sydney, Australia! I’m currently a student, but I one day hope to become a fashion editor of a magazine or an actress. 

What is the natural hair scene like in Australia?
E:
Most of the African girls I’m friends with get their hair braided or wear weaves. I know a few mixed girls however, that leave their hair natural.

When and how did you transition into natural hair?
E:
I’ve pretty much always had my hair natural although I did go through a stage where I wanted straight hair more than anything. About 2 years ago I used to straighten it 2–3 times a week despite my family telling me how much prettier I looked with curly hair, and how the heat was ruining my hair. It got to a point where the ends of my hair would no longer curl. By that stage I regretted straightening it so much and wanted my curls more than anything.

After the straight hair stage I decided to start fresh. I cut my hair to my shoulders in order to get rid of all the straight ends and to help it grow back healthy. I promised myself I would embrace my curls and stop straightening my hair. Since then it’s grown back and my hair is healthier than ever.

In what ways (if any) has going natural affected you?
E:
Leaving my hair curly and natural ended up being a huge confidence boost. I’m always getting told how cool my hair is and I love that it sets me apart from everyone else. I came to realize there was no point wishing for something else when you can rock what you were already given.

How would you describe your hair?
E:
The texture of curls I have would fall under the ‘3b’ category. When I was younger they would have definitely been 3c, but as I’ve gotten older and my hair has gotten longer the curls have loosened. My hair is thick and soft. On occasion my curls are frizzy (usually at the top), but for the most part easy to manage as long as it’s well conditioned. My curls can be both tight and loose depending on the conditioners I use and whether they are blow-dried or dry naturally.

What is your regimen?
E:
My hair regimen is pretty straight forward. I wet my hair, put conditioner in it and brush it through everyday. Every 2nd or 3rd day I wash it with both shampoo and conditioner. After that, depending on the weather I let it naturally dry or usually dry the roots and leave the bottom to dry naturally. I know washing your hair and drying it everyday is bad, but it makes it so much easier to style and manage especially for school.

I don’t really have specific products I use. I try lots of different ones. I’ve tried all kinds of salon treatments and leave in conditioners, but none of them have left me impressed. They usually make my curls separate and look thin or spring up and leave my hair looking really short. I try to buy conditioner and shampoo aimed at curly hair and have found that Pantene for curly hair gives me the best result. It makes my curls defined yet maintains the length, and leaves my hair looking really shiny.

How do you retain length and moisture in your hair?
E:
For moisture — Minimal heat (straightening, blow drying). Lots of conditioner! For length — Trimming the ends of my hair every few months.

What mistakes have you made with your hair that you’ve learned from?
E:
Not to use African Balms in my hair! I tried and ended up having really oily looking hair for ages. My hair isn’t the right texture to take it. Also straightening my hair so much that the ends end up staying straight.

What would you like to see in Australia in terms of hair care?
E:
African Australians feeling beautiful and confident without feeling the need to wear a weave, braids, get their hair relaxed, etc.

Is there a blog/webpage where we can find you?
E:
eeebony.tumblr.com

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About Meosha

Just another lover of natural hair and expression. - Style Icon Coordinator for BGLH

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Annie L.
Annie L.
8 years ago

Simply gorgeous! Her hair seems ridiculously healthy. We have a similar routine, I rinse my hair every day and go through it with my leave-in and cleanse every 2–3 days and have great results so I don’t think any harm is being done. Great pics, will check out her site.

BTW: I’ve heard Aboriginal but never African Australian, really cool to know!

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  Annie L.

seriously? it’s called globalisation.

Maha
Maha
8 years ago
Reply to  globalisation

You don’t have to attack her… she said she didn’t know… Now she knows.
I find that this sight brings light to a LOT of unknown people, ideas, facts, and things… no need to get up in arms.

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  Maha

i was just expressing my amazement to her small minded view of the world. i am so happy she is enlightened now.

Moreniqua
Moreniqua
8 years ago
Reply to  globalisation

@“Globalisation” you did attack her, and for no good reason. And as for your baseless generalizations, not all American Blacks believe we were the first and last stop in slavery; actually, anyone even MINUTELY educated in Black history knows we weren’t the first stop at all and that more Blacks went to other countries in the Americas than they did to the US. A simple “African Australians are Africans that migrated or were born in Australia,” would have sufficed but you wanted to be a veritable asshole. And, as far as I can see, Aboriginees look entirely more “Black” than they… Read more »

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  Moreniqua

hahaha ok. that’s what your wikipedia definition tells you, but it is the goal towards an almost borderless society which implies the movement of people to facilitate the circulation of ideas and cultures and popular themes. and i certainly don’t need a degree to tell me that. and just because you’re dark doesn’t make you black either. they are genuinely dark skinned asian and i’m not talking about islanders either. and yes it’s true aborigines probably originated from africa long time ago, but it’s been so long ago that they’re more linked genetically to asian then they are bantu. and who are… Read more »

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  Moreniqua

and you’re taking what i said about ‘immigration’ way out of context — ‘skilled migration and refugee influx’? that was me explaining the increasing black population in australia. i was clearly referring to the use of the term ‘african’ to express a relation to africa and that it is a global theme. my response to annie here was my astonishment to her lack of this understanding towards other black populations derived from africa who live elsewhere.

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  globalisation

* my response to annie here was my astonishment to her lack of understanding with regard to the use of this term by OTHER black populations derived from africa who live elsewhere — especially considering she is sooo cultured.

Moreniqua
Moreniqua
8 years ago
Reply to  globalisation

All she said was she didn’t know there were African-Australians. You took that as a jump-off point to attack her. How is she wrong because she didn’t follow Australia’s particular racial immigration patterns???? You sound ridiculous. Do you know all of the races that have settled on EACH continent??? I bet not. So what did you hope to gain by talking down to her?? You gain nothing and you look ignorant. And, you also sound jealous that she is “soooo cultured.”

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  Moreniqua

on another note, what you simply may ‘see’ is not always what ‘is’. one would think someone with your academic history would be able to see such a fallacy

Moreniqua
Moreniqua
8 years ago
Reply to  globalisation

Wow you had a lot to say, but unfornately, the more you write the more apparent it is that you are uneducated and instead of holding up a useful dialogue you “mask” your lack of knowledge and lack of tact by snide remarks that fail to denigrate the opposition. Black history month eh?? So, bc you are “English” or whatever you propose to be, you are more educated on history than Black Americans? You generalized a country bc you are ignorant. We do read, we DO know our history, and what you know couldn’t fill a tea cup. Obviously. I… Read more »

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  Moreniqua

ha. never said i was English. once again you took what i said out of context. and yes secondly i do know that aborigines are considered to be islanders. HELLO I LIVE IN AUSTRALIA. you know for someone so smart, you’ve completely missed the mark of my posts. i in no way claimed to know more about black history month than black americans — i was responding to the dig made against me for spelling globalisation with an s as opposed to a z — because that’s how it is spelled in UK english — i do live in a… Read more »

Badger beauty
Badger beauty
8 years ago
Reply to  Moreniqua

Hey! Thanks for replying to her condescension. Also go badgers! I’m currently a student at u‑dub also.

We can lift others up or tear them down. Sadly she choose the latter.

Badger beauty
Badger beauty
8 years ago
Reply to  Badger beauty

*speaking to moreniqua

Annie L.
Annie L.
8 years ago
Reply to  globalisation

I’ve actually lived on 4 different continents, in 8 different countries, speak 4 different languages fluently, am an American married to a foreign national, worked in the foreign service for the State Department, taught English abroad, visited over 30 countries and count hundreds of acquaintances and many good friends from New York to Siberia to Burkina Faso and yes even Australia among my close contacts. I have an intimate knowledge of the breadth and depth of the word “globalization” whether you spell it with a “z” or an “s”. With all of this experience, I’m still not immune to learning… Read more »

Annie L.
Annie L.
8 years ago
Reply to  Annie L.

And by the way, I meant I’d never heard the TERM ‘African Australian’ used, as opposed to Aboriginal or modern African immigration.

Ebony
Ebony
8 years ago
Reply to  Annie L.

Hey Annie, my nationality is Ghanaian/Australian. However African girls born here or even just living here are considered to be ‘African-Australian’:)

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  Annie L.

i don’t see how i am a troll for merely expressing my opinion. i am entitled to that right and whether it’s positive or negative should be of no consequence to you. i am merely highlighting how african ‘americans’ believe they’re the only ones in the whole world, as expressed not only by this Annie but also numerous other commentors below, that use the term ‘african’ to express a relation to africa. i just so happen to be one of those african australians and i wanted to highlight how people should brighten their horizons and think outside the box for… Read more »

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  globalisation

* facebook pages

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  globalisation

OK, I’ll bite. I am one of those people who were shocked to hear of African Australians. I didn’t mean those who were born and lived in Africa, I meant black period. This does not in any way, shape or form mean that I think that America is the end all and be all of blacks (how silly would that be), I was shocked because my girlfriend visited and she said the atmosphere was very hostile to blacks, so much so that she has no plans on visiting again. She is very well traveled and her husband is white and… Read more »

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

lol. i was affronted simply because i was called a troll for expressing a contrary opinion. i find it easier to identify myself as an african australian to express my dual nationality. but even so the ignorance and negative race relations makes it harder for some to identify and me sometimes. i dont consider myself australian in the sense that i hold cultural beliefs or ideologies — i’m australian in every way on paper only. the fact of the matter is i’ll never be australian because im not white and i dont have a problem with that. the said is… Read more »

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  globalisation

and by what i mean by dark skinned — anything that isn’t white even if you’re like … brown or like tan or something 😛 you could be indian and be considered black here as well. for those interested, google indians and melbourne. you’ll be enlightened about how nasty race relations here can get. but that being said, as a whole i cannot say that australia is the worst place on earth, it’s just not as tolerant and that takes time and education. there are and will always be good people amidst a sea of adversity, regardless of race, religion and… Read more »

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  globalisation

Thanks, your experience echos that of my girlfriend.
Regardless of the weave movement, we’re glad that you’re on team natural.

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
8 years ago
Reply to  globalisation

@globalisation,

How are relations between African Australians and Aboriginals? Do they identify with each other? I’ve read that there were tensions between Sudanese refugees and some Aboriginals.

As a Jamaican American, I definitely identify with African Americans, although I recognize that our cultures/histories are very different.

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago

no, generally i can say they do not, of course there will always be exceptions to this rule. there’s actually a lot of animosity between blacks and aborigines. why? i’m not really sure. but what you makes you and african americans similar is that you have direct origins to africa. the same cannot be said for aborigines. we’re completely different in that regard. i think a lot of it has to do with australia’s represenation of what ‘black’ is — to australians being black is being american. so from that perspective, a lot of africans are not considered ‘black’ enough,… Read more »

Likewaterforchocolat
Likewaterforchocolat
8 years ago
Reply to  Annie L.

I agree Annie L. This site is almost becoming like those sites where angry black women just attack other black women who are attempting to have mature discourse.

Also,lack of knowledge of a particular fact does not make one “small-minded”. What a condescending thing to say.

Moreniqua
Moreniqua
8 years ago

I agree as well! Well-said!

EG
EG
8 years ago
Reply to  Annie L.

What I love about this site is the diversity. I did not know that there were black Australians either. I wonder if they will showcase any blacks from Ireland or from the Asia Pacific region. That would be cool.

Iris
Iris
8 years ago
Reply to  EG

At least French naturals are checked! Ive seen some on the site! Not regarding African Australian, I’ve met one girl once in Italy and she came from there and I was really surprised because of all that I’ve heard about Australia and racism. To me it’s kind of like Japan where I know that there are very few black folks, but now thanks to ebony& globalisation Im aware! Well in France the diversity is great, People come From northern & southern Africa, Asia and the former colonies which became real states in the 1800 such as Guyana, Martinique & Guadeloupe (in the… Read more »

Trini
Trini
8 years ago
Reply to  Annie L.

I stand corrected, but aren’t the Aborigines similar to the Native Americans, or in the case of the Caribbean, the Caribs and Arawaks? If such is the case, they aren’t of African descent.

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  Trini

no aborigines are not of african descent, in fact they are more asian than anything else genetically speaking. african australians refers to black people from africa, who were either born in australia or who have migrated to australia and are now residents/citizens (kind of like how americans have chinese-americans and such). the black population is due to refugee influx and skilled migration.

Trini
Trini
8 years ago
Reply to  globalisation

Thanks for clarifying the first statement made by Annie L. which seemed to equate Aborigines with Africans — at least my interpretation of it. You make some interesting points. If I were you I would remind Australians of how the country was first settled i.e. British convicts. I’ll definitely Google the race relations in Melbourne to see what’s happening there as well. On another note I remember watching a soap opera set in Austrailia (when I lived in Trinidad), and I could have sworn that there were black actors. This was about 25 years ago, so perhaps my memory is fuzzy. Anyway,… Read more »

globalisation
globalisation
8 years ago
Reply to  Trini

LOL! About convict argument. Yep it’s a relevant topic for discussion that’s for sure. But honestly, I don’t let them get me down. I know what I’m doing with my life and where I’m going. Ah yes, the female you are referring to is Cathy Freeman. I remember watching it on TV while still in Africa. That aside, Australia’s multicultural development is actually very recent. It’s only been about 30 years since the White Australia policy was abolished. It’s entirely possible you could have seen black actors on TV — whether they were Africans or even Islanders. And it’s good to… Read more »

Sieta Majok
8 years ago

I have a lot of relatives living in Australia and I know there are black people there too but rarely do you hear of Africans in Australia regarding natural hair! This post is simply refreshing (just like the other post a few days ago, Marawa’s interview). Her hair is gorgeous.

herlucidsKy
8 years ago

It’s not a necessarily a bad thing to wash your hair as frequently as you do because if it is working out great for you in the long run then continue on with it. What’s great for you may be bad for someone else and vice versa. Keep up the good work and always do what’s best for you because your hair appears to be very healthy.

kg.sunshine
kg.sunshine
8 years ago

Gorgeous hair! Love it.

Sass' n Curlz
8 years ago

Love Love her !

Sass' n Curlz
8 years ago

**love her hair** is what I meant :o)

Alicia L.
Alicia L.
8 years ago

YAY!! I’m in Sydney too studying at UNSW, we should link up 🙂

Cia
Cia
8 years ago

Pretty young lady and very beautiful hair. I love these post that feature ladies and hair from all over. Very interesting!!

Shay
8 years ago

This is a nice article. She definitely has the classic Aussie boho-style! I lived in Adelaide Australia earlier this year and I used to get all kinds of strange stares & comments about my hair. Even the Aboriginese wanted to touch it! LOL It wasn’t negative rather curious. I’ve never had so much attention drawn to my wild (auburn colored)blow outs before infact, it actually bothered me when strangers would stare or ask to touch. When I was in Sydney or Melbourne, no one even looked twice but I ended up dyeing it black anyway just to cut back on… Read more »

Lisa
Lisa
8 years ago
Reply to  Shay

You don’t have to select ‘African-American’ on the census. Just put other and write in what you want.

Ziora
Ziora
8 years ago
Reply to  Shay

American is not a “race” so therefore, that option is not available.

Antoinette Stewart
8 years ago

My oh my isn’t she so sweet! Love your style Ebony!

Nelda Scott
Nelda Scott
8 years ago

I concur! Beautiful!

Trini
Trini
8 years ago

Gorgeous hair mate! Like others have commented, it’s refreshing to learn about naturals from varied parts of the world.

Gemlocs
Gemlocs
8 years ago
Reply to  Trini

+1

Etnahs
8 years ago

Her hair is gorgeous. I have the biggest geographical crush on Australia and I will move there one day. I promised myself.

Taji
Taji
8 years ago

I LOOOVE THIS SITE. Who knew there were African Australians? I didn’t and now am convinced our beauty resonates all over the globe. I wish mainstream advertising would recognize that and not just bi racial looking but the beautiful dark skin black beauties around the globe.

natural human hair
8 years ago

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illegal immigration solutions

Thanks for every other magnificent article. The place else could anybody get that kind of information in such a perfect means of writing? I have a presentation subsequent week, and I am on the search for such info.

alisha dewberry
alisha dewberry
5 years ago

There’s a great place to get products for natural and black hair in Australia. It’s called Essence. They even carry products from the USA like Hair Hope Growth Oil.

1461 Centre Rd, Clayton 3168
03 95448605
http://www.ebonyhairexpressions.com.au/

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