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How to Combat Dandruff

• Nov 27, 2011

When regular shampoos fail, over the counter dandruff shampoos may succeed. But dandruff shampoos aren’t all alike, and you may need to experiment until you find one that works for you. If you develop itching, stinging, redness or burning from any of these products, discontinue use. If you develop an allergic reaction, such as a rash, hives or difficulty breathing, seek immediate medical attention.

Dandruff shampoos are classified according to the medication they contain:

Zinc pyrithione shampoos (such as Selsun Salon, Head & Shoulders)

These contain the antibacterial and antifungal agent zinc pyrithione, which can reduce the fungus on your scalp that can cause dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis.

Tar-based shampoos (such as Neutrogena T/Gel)

Coal tar, a byproduct of the coal manufacturing process, helps conditions such as dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis by slowing how quickly skin cells on your scalp die and flake off.

Shampoos containing salicylic acid (such as Ionil T)

These “scalp scrubs” help eliminate scale, but they may leave your scalp dry, leading to more flaking. Using a conditioner after shampooing can help relieve dryness.

Selenium sulfide shampoos (such as Selsun Blue)

These shampoos slow your skin cells from dying and may also reduce malassezia. Because they can discolor blond, gray or chemically colored hair, be sure to use them only as directed, and rinse well after shampooing.

Ketoconazole shampoos (such as Nizoral)

Ketoconazole is a broad-spectrum antifungal agent that may work when other shampoos fail. It’s available over-the-counter as well as by prescription.

Try using one of these shampoos daily or every other day until your dandruff is controlled; then cut back to two or three times a week, as needed. If one type of shampoo works for a time and then seems to lose its effectiveness, try alternating between two types of dandruff shampoos. Be sure to massage the shampoo into the scalp well and then leave the shampoo on for at least five minutes — this gives the ingredients time to work.

Ladies, do you ever get dandruff? How do you combat it?

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mangomadness
mangomadness
9 years ago

Shampooing often (every 5–7 days) as well as doing the ocassional coconut oil/tea tree EO/peppermint EO scalp pre-poo helps keep the flakes away. I also don’t co-wash or grease/oil my scalp.

In addition, Shea Moisture African Black Soap Shampoo is great for the scalp–It has lot’s of natural ingredients that promote scalp health (tea tree EO, neem oil, etc) as well as salicylic acid. If you try it, make sure to pre-poo beforehand and focus on the scalp–it’s a clarifying shampoo and can be a bit drying on the strands.

mangomadness
mangomadness
9 years ago
Reply to  mangomadness

ACV rinses help as well. I usually use a water/ACV/tea tree EO/peppermint EO mix.

Godiva
Godiva
9 years ago
Reply to  mangomadness

That has been the only thing that has worked for me!! ACV is effective and CHEAP!

KB
KB
9 years ago

I shampoo with Aveda Scalp Benefits shampoo every 7–10 days. Every night I spray my hair and scalp with a mix of aloe vera juice, rosewater, sweet almond oil, along with tea tree, rosemary, and peppermint essential oils. I think keeping my scalp clean and the daily spritzing has really helped. I do co-wash occasionally but I keep it to a minimum– once a week in the summer and rarely in the winter just to get the sweat off my scalp without drying my hair, since I attend hot yoga 2–3x a week. The Aveda shampoo is sulfate-free but shampooing… Read more »

Jack
Jack
9 years ago

I agree with mangomadness, not greasing or putting other products on my scalp help with my dandruff. That’s one of the reasons why I stay away from mineral oil and petrolatum containing products.

Sophie Ann
Sophie Ann
9 years ago

Daily shampooing really does not sound appealing. We all know how much Afro-hair gets dry so easily, and the drier it gets, the easier it breaks off. I would love a method that does not involve washing so often.

Starr
9 years ago

I rinse with a rosemary tea rinse that I make by boiling/seeping fresh rosemary leaves. Whenever I feel an itch, I rinse with that and use it as a daily spray. The biggest thing for me was realizing that my scalp needed to be rinsed at least 2x a week.

Ayo
Ayo
9 years ago

I have a condition called sebhorrheic dermatitis of the scalp and it is the worst in the winter. I went to a dermatologist and was prescribed a steroid oil that does help with the flaking and itching, however it costs an arm and a leg, and it causes me to break out leaving my face so greasy and it weighs down my hair. Looking online I have read about vinegar rinses that help as well as using sulfate free shampoos and conditioner. I have bought a shampoo over the counter that helps deal with the condition I have, and I… Read more »

Ce Ce
Ce Ce
9 years ago
Reply to  Ayo

I also have seborrhea dermatitis and I have dealt with the condition for over 4 years now. I did go to the dermatologist but I found that the prescribed cortesteroid cream did not help. I tried the prescribed shampoos and even rotated over the counter shampoos. My scalp was more irritated than ever. The prescribed shampoos and creams dried out my hair. My hair just would not grow. Then, one day I was shopping in Target and I discovered Shea Moisture Deep Cleansing African Black soap shampoo and conditioner. My scalp improved by 100% This was 2 summers ago and… Read more »

Ayo
Ayo
9 years ago
Reply to  Ce Ce

Thank you so much! I was just diagnosed with the condition in March…and it has been rough. I will definitely check out target for the products you mentioned!

Mel
Mel
9 years ago
Reply to  Ayo

+1

Thank you for the extra info.

MrsCottonCurls
MrsCottonCurls
9 years ago

I’ve suffered with dandruff all my life (my dad & sister have it as well) and since going natural 4 years ago, nothing has changed. It has gotten a little better, especially in the summer months, but I’m still not happy. I wash my hair with Giovanni 50:50 or Trader Joe’s Nourish Spa every Sunday and sometimes I co-wash midweek if needed. But I’m definitely going to try the tea tree & peppermint EO prepoo described by mangomadness and the daily hair spritz with tea tree/peppermint/rosemary EO described by KB. Thanks for the info ladies!
[img]http://bglhonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/hairshow5.jpg[/img]

jeleane
jeleane
9 years ago

I use ORIGINAL tgel shampoo wash weekly sometimes biweekly had dandruff problems at young age when natural and now with a perm I grease my scalp with rosemary mint grease been good so far

babs
babs
8 years ago

I was just dx with seborrhic dermatitis by dermotologist. He rx’ d me some generic nizoral 1× wkly & triamcinolone lotion to my scalp area every 2 days. The itching seems to have stopped some & i have not noticed any of the oily flaky stuff… so wish me luck. Noticed that these posts are 2 years old…its now 2013..anybody still out there??

LaMetria Dunn
LaMetria Dunn
8 years ago
Reply to  babs

I was diagnosed with scalp psoriasis about 3 years ago and i find that Neutrogena Scalp build-up shampoo helps! Everything i was prescribed dried my hair out or just didnt work, i just recently started using Shea Moisture African black soap line and i do like it but i feel that its not strong enough especially now since it is cold out. I also started doing the ACV rinse which i really found helpful and as well as using Tea tree oil…not the hollywood beauty kind. This condition is really stressful at times but it can always be a lot… Read more »

Darlyn
Darlyn
8 years ago

Ever since I’ve started washing my hair with baking soda and apple cider vinegar, I haven’t had any dandruff.

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