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A bi-racial woman’s response to the Mixed Chicks Twitter debate

Avatar • Jan 24, 2011

By Makiya (not pictured above)

While reading the article Mixed Chicks supports team light skin on Twitter, experiences fallout I was shocked by the nature of some of the comments which were directed at the brand name and the identity of mixed-race people.

Is it possible that in 2011, people can still hold these views?

Unfortunately so. I live in the UK and I have to say that it appears that race is seen very differently in America. I class myself as mixed British. This is what I relate to, how I was brought up and which I am happy to identify with. This is accepted and not questioned, yet in America it appears to be a totally different story. I just wanted to take the time to look into some of the comments and points regularly made when the topic of mixed-race has been brought up (for example, on the article When Natural Hair Tells a Different Story) and to hopefully shed a little light on the mixed-race identity. For the purpose of this article when using the word ‘mixed-race’ I am talking about those whose mix includes the Black race as this is what others comments are referring to.

1.) The term mixed-race does not apply to skin colour. Many people supported this notion agreeing that there was no ‘one’ colour or shade for those who are mixed-race. Yet some disputed this by latching onto the cliché and the Media’s single portrayal, that mixed-race women are light skinned with long curly hair. Being mixed-race is not always a simple case of being ½ one race and ½ another. There are many racial combinations and percentages of racial mixtures. Because of this the ‘mixed-race’ is hugely diverse, with a range of skin tone and hues, eye colours, hair colours and textures. This stereotype of the so-called average mixed-race woman needs to be erased as there is just so much diversity that comes with being a mixture of different races.

2.) A commonly heard phrase is: “Society sees them as Black anyway, so why bother to class yourself as mixed?” This implies that in order for someone with mixed heritage to define themselves and establish their identity, they must either conform to society’s standards and views or allow others to dictate how they see themselves, without giving a thought to how they feel. Just because society may see you a certain way doesn’t mean that that is the way you should see yourself. Society may see mixed-race people as Black but this does not mean that they have to identify with what ‘box’ society has put them in. You define who you are. Regardless of how society sees you, you should be able to form your own identity. The society does not truly dictate who you are, only how you think/feel about yourself.

3.) One comment that I have heard many times but truly do not understand is when others feel uncomfortable about someone acknowledging their multiple races: “I have a problem with people classing themselves as mixed-race.” Why on earth should anyone else have a problem with a person classing themselves as mixed? Does this affect you in any way? Is it life changing? No, I didn’t think so. If a person has a problem with someone stating what they are then they are indeed the ones with the problem. I think that when people have views like this they really need to take a look at themselves. They need to find out why it is that they feel this way because surely it cannot be coming from a place of positivity and acceptance.

4.) Within the Black community some people think that by people classing themselves as mixed they just want to be separate from the Black race: “They just don’t like their blackness. They want to be different and therefore they have self-hate issues.” Classing yourself as mixed does not mean that a person does not want to be Black. It means that a person wants to acknowledge all of who they are, not just a singular race. Identifying as mixed-race is embracing all of a person’s cultures, heritages and backgrounds. It has nothing to do with the denial of the Black race. Just because you are part Black doesn’t mean that that’s the only race you should identify with. Why is it that as soon as a person wants to class themselves as mixed-race, they are instantly seen as a self-hater who wishes to rid of their blackness by ‘diluting’ it? I know many mixed-race people who are proud to be Black. Yet they are also proud to be White, Asian, etc.

5.) Oh the ‘Tragic mulatto’ stereotype. “All mixed people do is talk about their problems, it’s always woe is me.” Poor confused mixed girl, right? Wrong. Although people of mixed cultures and races may carefully think about how to define themselves, not all of us are confused and feel totally lost. Some mixed-race people may not feel accepted by one of their races or one may always have to define their race to others, but these are experiences that some mixed people have come in contact with. The fact that many have experienced situations like this does not mean that we are all depressed and ‘tragic’. A lot of mixed-race people are well adjusted and happy with who they are.

6.) Now… here it comes… the most ignorant and over-used statement in relation to the classification of being mixed-race: “All African-Americans are mixed anyway.” Where do I start? Firstly, not all African-Americans are mixed. Yes, some of the slave masters had children with the field slaves and these bi-racial offspring became known as the house slaves. Yet many slaves also had children with each other, with no mixing from the white landowners or the mixed-race house slaves. Secondly, yes some African-Americans do have traces of mixed ancestry, but this cannot be compared to someone living through current ‘mixed-race’ experiences and who has a significant percentage of mixture of races to affect their daily lives. The majority of mixed-race people do not have to search their ancestry in order to find a mixture of other races. These will come straight from their parents or their grandparents. Basically, it doesn’t need tracing to find where the mixture started. Someone being 1/60th Cherokee Indian will not have the same experiences as someone who is ½ Black, ¼ White and ¼ Asian. To put all African-Americans in the ‘mixed barrel’ in order to justify why no one should class themselves as mixed-race is ridiculous. Someone whose Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great grandmother was ¼ white is not going to fully understand what it is like to grow-up with a mixed heritage and the chances they have been affected by it is close to nil.

I feel that it is not fair for someone to use this statement in order to make the mixed-race term seem like an irrelevant and pointless definition. By saying that all African-Americans are mixed means that people are not acknowledging that there is a clear difference between being ‘mixed’ way back in the day and being mixed, right here, now, today.

I hope that this has cleared a few things up and that people can view these points from a different perspective. I think that the most important thing is to have ‘The freedom to be who you are’ (ironically the mixed Chicks leaflet slogan). It’s not about being what society sees you as, but being who you know you are. Whether that’s classing yourself as mixed-race, Black, White or Asian. Be proud to be who you are. It is not right to pass judgement on a person unless you have ever walked in their shoes.

What are your thoughts on this?

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freeyourheart
9 years ago

honestly, i’m tired of the whole mixed chicks debate/backlash. yes, what they said was ignorant. yes, it’s ignorant of people being on any team related to race/skin color. yes, it’s ignorant of people to make insensitive comments because of race.

at the end of the day, there are more pressing issues to deal with besides twitter beef. know who you are, think before you tweet if you’re representing a brand, and ignore the negativity.

http://msjanelle.blogspot.com

Shay
Shay
9 years ago
Reply to  freeyourheart

I completely agree!!

LISHA
LISHA
9 years ago
Reply to  freeyourheart

I agree 100%…

Nicole
9 years ago
Reply to  LISHA

Yes! This is so true! I’m tired of the back and forth and all the drama it causes. Here is my call to all mixed girls and black girls:
http://mixedreamers.blogspot.com/2010/12/for-mixed-girls-for-black-girls.html

AishaSaidIt
9 years ago
Reply to  freeyourheart

I agree with freeyourheart. This article is way too long (sorry didn’t read it). These post are way too long. This conversation is wait for it.….….Way Too Long. Let’s move out.

Rachel
Rachel
9 years ago
Reply to  freeyourheart

Yes! Thank you! I am tired of this issue too! I am also tired of people having to defend their heritage on this blog. This is supposed to be a space for education and healing. Not one that promotes separation.

Michelle Hubbard
Michelle Hubbard
9 years ago

I agree with the poster. However, I do not think the “debate” about the Mixedchicks tweets had anything to do with identity as much as it did exclusion and division. Mixedchicks did not tweet on a “mixed-persons” board, but on a board with “black” Americans who have a long history of making a big deal out of someone’s skintone. If you are mixed-race, you are mixed-race and should be able to identify as that and be happy with it.:)

Anonda
Anonda
9 years ago

I agree with all these points EXCEPT for no. 6. That’s not about race (race is a social construct and biologically does not hold water) that is about CULTURE. I totally agree that growing up with two easily identifiable parents of different cultures will yield a different experience, but let’s stop muddying the concept of biological race. If you are not going around dna haplotyping people then you are not qualified to say just by looking what admixture a “black” person is. Also, by doing that you are exhibiting the same behavior you are fighting against i.e. telling another that their… Read more »

candy
9 years ago
Reply to  Anonda

this. this. THIS!

NappyKitchen
NappyKitchen
9 years ago
Reply to  Anonda

Well when we all need some bone marrow we can decide what box to tick.

donna
donna
9 years ago
Reply to  Anonda

I think part of that statement, which I’ve made myself is how people use it as if it’s no biggie because we’re all mixed anyway when that isn’t true, not that she’s saying you’re less mixed than I am. Or the fact that how it impacts you as a person is different. For example my grandfather is mixed with Indian. That’s all I know Indian I assume Native American and not that one of his parents are from India. He died when I was young and it’s not something that’s spoken on often, we have no clue of anything apart from… Read more »

Anonda
Anonda
9 years ago
Reply to  donna

Donna I understand that. Truly I do that’s why I said it’s about culture dictating experience NOT race. If I’m Bi-cultural, and one of my parents dies and I never knew that person does that make me any less “mixed”? Because I never knew them does that mean that I can’t claim their genes and heritage? That’s the situation for many many African Americans. Just because we didn’t ( weren’t allowed to in most cases) grow up with our ancestors and all their customs and experiences does not void of us the right to acknowledge them. Who gets to decide… Read more »

Jasmine
Jasmine
9 years ago
Reply to  Anonda

#cosign

Cherie
9 years ago
Reply to  Anonda

I totally agree with you, Anonda. I felt the writer just completey wrote off African Americans who embrace their distant ancestral heritage, be it Cherokee, Caucasian, Hopi or whatever. No African American is pure Nigerian or Ghanaian, etc. Just because I may not know all of what I am mixed with, I don’t have a right to embrace what I do know of? Sounds like she just basically reversed the “one drop rule”. So instead of the usual if you have one drop of Black blood then you are Black, she seems to imply unless you are directly mixed with… Read more »

Shannon
Shannon
9 years ago
Reply to  Cherie

I agree with Cherie completely. And I wanted to add that most African Americans do not know how mixed they are. Take Henry Louis Gates, he has no recent mixing in his bloodline. Even so, after taking a blood test he found out that genetically he is 1/2 white. If that isn’t mixed I don’t know what is. Another thing to think about when telling someone that “yes some African-Americans do have traces of mixed ancestry, but this cannot be compared to someone living through current ‘mixed-race’ experiences and who has a significant percentage of mixture of races to affect… Read more »

Alaina
Alaina
9 years ago
Reply to  Anonda

thank you! I was with the writer until she said that. no, i do not have one parent that is native american and one that is black, but my life experience and the history of my grandparents and their parents and their parents were defined by the indian nation that enslaved them, and that were also their brethren. so yeah, i might be 1/16 Choctaw, but I am involved in both the Native and Black communities and I know my history and traditions. I’m not just someone walking around claiming to be Indian. By using point #6 in my mind,… Read more »

Anon
Anon
9 years ago
Reply to  Anonda

exactly! that is where she lost me…

Lola
Lola
9 years ago

Honestly, I get the writers point and I completey agree with her view on the whole identity thing. However, what I do not understand is how it directly relates to the ‘mixed chicks’ debacle. To make reference to the debacle but not ‘connect the dots’ is a little confusing. Did the author mean that there were fair grounds for ‘mixed chicks’ to have taken the position they did on the stupid concept of ‘team light skin’/‘team dark skin’? Or was her view the opposite. Sorry but I’m confused…

CarmelStacks
CarmelStacks
9 years ago
Reply to  Lola

I’m wondering if the author realizes “Mixed Chicks” is the name of the brand.

Keisha
Keisha
9 years ago
Reply to  CarmelStacks

lmao

donna
donna
9 years ago
Reply to  Lola

Alot of people made comments on here about how they hate the name of the company anyway and how it only further drives us as people apart.

I’m assuming that’s what motivated this.

Baby Brown
Baby Brown
9 years ago
Reply to  Lola

She stopped just short of saying mixed chicks was ok in their decision to go for “team light skin”.….lol.…(literally) which is fine with me because i don’t use their products anyway. Now being a woman of color, and if did use their products.……TRASH CAN QUICKLY!!!!!

lee
lee
9 years ago

i don’t understand what this article has to do with a company jumping on the #teamlightskin trending topic. maybe i am out of the loop. however, it was well thought out and an intersting read.

#teamstrongwomen (hello!)

Angela R
Angela R
9 years ago
Reply to  lee

This is the real issue regarding the MC Twitter incident. The author did not address this in her response.

Jasmine
Jasmine
9 years ago
Reply to  lee

i don’t either. I feel like she completely went left with the topic at hand.

Leandra
Leandra
9 years ago
Reply to  Jasmine

Her response isn’t to the incident but the reaction. BGLH could have said A bi-racial woman’s response to the mixed chicks twitter storm/backlash. The title is probably confusing people.

A Simple Thing
9 years ago

As a spectator from the UK, I can agree with several of the sentiments above.
However, I always thought that the situation in the U.S was different because of the ‘one drop rule’.

kenda
9 years ago
Reply to  A Simple Thing

i think we have to careful when trying to compare race between different countries since so much of how we view race is country-specific.

mrs247
mrs247
9 years ago

Makiya, thank you so much for writing this! I completely agree & cosign with everything you have said. As a mixed-race woman myself, 1/2 black & 1/2 white, I have obviously grown up & dealt with all the stereotypes you have mentioned. It is unbelievable to me the ignorance that a lot of people have when it comes to biracial, multiracial, mixed race, or however you want to label us. For example…YES, I am 1/2 white, YES I am “light-skinned, yellow-bone, etc” or however you want to say it, but NO I do not have the “typical mixed-girl hair,” the… Read more »

donna
donna
9 years ago
Reply to  mrs247

Agree with you wholeheartedly, I’m not mixed, not directly so it’s basically like you said about the guy I don’t identify myself as being such, I do acknowledge my heritage however. Anywhoo saying that to say I’m not mixed but I’ve always hated when mixed individuals did not identify with 100% of who they are especially when the mother is the denied race like I love my pop, but it’s my mom that I identify with the most so I could never understand if say a mixed friend of mines who has a white mother and black father considered themselves… Read more »

donna
donna
9 years ago
Reply to  donna

Oh and in case I’m not clear, not saying you should identify with what you’re mother is, but with both ethnicities. Just saying in my experience with people that I’ve known to be mixed, I couldn’t understand how they would say they’re black when that isn’t 100% true, not just when it comes to physical but culturally as well.

Lala
9 years ago
Reply to  donna

I agree with everything you said! I’m dealing with this now, my fiance is Filipino and his previous wife is black, they have a daughter who is having identity issues. In our house she knows that he don’t tolerate her not acknowledging both of her parents. It would be disrespectful for her to say that she is solely Filipino and it would be disrespectful for her to say that she is solely black. The problem is that her mother doesn’t share the same beliefs as my fiance and I. She encourages her to deny her black heritage and not to… Read more »

O.
O.
9 years ago

I definitely agree wholeheartedly with this article. I have seen comments before where others state that a mixed individual should stop “lying to them-self” and understand that they are black. I’m Kenyan and my cousin is half Kenyan and half Italian. She would be lying to herself if she said she is black because she would be erasing the half of her that is Italian. Labeling oneself as “mixed” indicates to the world that there is a diverse mixture of culture in their heritage. I think everyone needs to stop the nonsense of simplifying race and culture. The complexity of… Read more »

Come On People
Come On People
9 years ago
Reply to  O.

The only problem is that black americans, it is not that cut and dry. Most black americans are of mixed race, and it is not just in the distant distant past. it is within the last few generations where they know and see the mixture.

mrscoutrmmm
mrscoutrmmm
9 years ago

I respect what the author has to say but 1)How does this relate to mixed chicks a brand that many African American women of all shades use jumping on team light skin and 2) I know our brothers and sisters across the pound have their own issues with race and thankfully I have been blessed with the chance to travel and see that race in Europe is seen differently then here in America. Not to down play what you (the author) have gone through as a biracial women but in American as such a “young” country with such deep deep… Read more »

tijarah08
tijarah08
9 years ago
Reply to  mrscoutrmmm

Trust and believe a lot of these countries have not overcome their race issues, they just play them down or try to associate the issues with anything other than race i.e. Brazil

Kurly Kels
9 years ago

I say dust that chip off of your shoulder! I think most everything she mention was a black issue period. The reason people get irritated at hearing “I’m mixed — I’m mixed” is because a lot of people act like their “mixed” problems are so much worse or so much more mixed-up than the next black girl. Get over it..you’re black, therefore you have the same kinds of issues anyone else has..if not to an even lesser extent in terms of society and being accepted. Another thing, yes all black americans are mixed with something whether you accept that or… Read more »

Rachel
Rachel
9 years ago
Reply to  Kurly Kels

You might be generalising here, I don’t think the majority of mixed people act like they have more dramatic problems. You might just misunderstand the identity crisis some of them may go through (which has nothing to do with anybody else but themselves and the way they accept themselves — or not — as part of 2 races). I’m mixed myself (Black Mum/White Dad), and I remember struggling to come to terms with who (or should I say what ?) I was when I was a little girl, because it seemed I had to choose between being black or being white.… Read more »

Rachel
Rachel
9 years ago
Reply to  Rachel

oh, and yeah, what I just said hasn’t got much to do with that “Mixed Chicks” debacle that prompted her rant in the 1st place, sorry about that ! ^_^ Just wanted to bring my view on what you said.

CurlyC
CurlyC
9 years ago
Reply to  Kurly Kels

NO! at the end of the day we are most certainly not black women, there are some black women, and there are some mixed women. And not everybody acts like their “mixed problems” are worse than other black womens problems. And the issues are different, and the ones that are the same are NOT to a lesser extent, because when a black girl is rejected by the white community, they’re accepted by the black community, but mixed girls often times are rejected by the black, and the white community. And out of the millions and millions of black americans, not… Read more »

Dionne
Dionne
9 years ago
Reply to  CurlyC

At the end of the day, we are all the same, not because we are black, not because we are mixed, but because we are human. We are each unique individuals and yet we ALL have things in common. This debate is ridiculous, and I think the problem begins when each person on either side assumes that they know the problems of the other. We ALL have issues fitting in. We ALL have issues accepting ourselves. We ALL have to learn who we are and accept where we come from… black women, mixed women, white women, poor women, rich women,… Read more »

Eve
Eve
9 years ago

Although I applaud the poster for writing on a controversal topic there are a couple of huuuuge issues that set off a knee jerk negative reaction on my part to what she wrote: 1) First and foremost, she lives in THE UK!!! For the poster to comment on a culture that she only has surface knowledge of is completely ignorant and insulting. The black/ mixed race issue here in the US has a long and complex history (paper bag tests, miscegenation laws, the one drop rule, passing, and exclusion to historically black colleges, sororities, and fraternities) so for her to make… Read more »

sydney
9 years ago
Reply to  Eve

I agree 100%. That is all.

Rai
Rai
9 years ago
Reply to  Eve

Very well said!

Jade
9 years ago
Reply to  Rai

Thank you, Eve.

Michelle Hubbard
Michelle Hubbard
9 years ago
Reply to  Eve

Well written.:)

binks
binks
9 years ago
Reply to  Eve

Amen to this and a few other comments on the post. Sorry but the author missed some KEY issues, mixed up ideologies of race vs. culture, and doesn’t seem well informed to be honest. She hasn’t even scratched the surface of this topic so before she can critique and speak upon something, (mainly a culture she doesn’t have first hand experience with) either needs to pick up a few books or live here fully. Personally, I am sick and tired of people trying to tell people how we should think, feel, what to accept or what to believe when it… Read more »

Angela R
Angela R
9 years ago
Reply to  Eve

Agree with all your points except #1. The perceived priveledge of having light skin is an international issue.

CurlyC
CurlyC
9 years ago
Reply to  Eve

She isn’t saying that anyone is more soecial than another, she is simply saying that the girl who is half and half and lives with both races that are part of her is going to be much different than someone who may be mixed, but is “seen” as black, and raised by predominantly black people.

CurlyC
CurlyC
9 years ago
Reply to  CurlyC

special*

Anonymous
Anonymous
9 years ago
Reply to  Eve

Co-signs. And the whole Mixed Chicks debate about supporting team light skin was ignored too by this poster. I understand that mixed people want to claim both sides of their heritage. Genetically, most black people are mixed with something… but phenotypically (outwardly) we might not show it. The entire line of my mother’s side of the family was mixed with white. My mother could even pass for white, but she chose to call herself black. In my family’s case, my great grandfather had constant contact with the white relative who was his father. The were creoles. My grandfather spoke french creole… Read more »

Dionne
Dionne
9 years ago
Reply to  Anonymous

You just shut down this whole debate… This is the core of the issue. Colorism. It has NOTHING to do with race (being mixed or not). It’s skin tone and shades that causes the divides.

Come On People
Come On People
9 years ago
Reply to  Dionne

My neice and nephew are technically black, their parents are technically black, and their grand parents are technically black. However, they are mixed with (middle eastern) indian, and venezalan. Are they not mixed because their parents and grand parents are not technically mixed? According to this person’s reasoning, they are not mixed. However, it is clear that they are. What about a person that is black who last name is Gonzales from louisiana, my uncle. His parents and grand parents are considered black. However, it is very clear that he is of mixed heritage. I was with her until the… Read more »

kend
9 years ago

i dislike that mixed chicks promotes the idea that there’s a direct correlation between racial mixture & hair type (race is a social construct not a biological fact), and the only thing stupider than their original #teamlightskin tweet was the way they handled the aftermath. that being said, i don’t have a problem with products or services being geared towards mixed race people and their unique needs. i just think you’ve got to do it in a way that doesn’t marginalize other groups. we don’t live in a vacuum. just like the phrase “white power” has a different connotation than… Read more »

Jade
Jade
9 years ago

Why are these issues always addressed on “black” dominated media like this website?

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
9 years ago
Reply to  Jade

I wonder about that too. Why are Black women concerned about mixed women? Why don’t mixed women write about their issues on their own websites? They make it clear that they are not Black, so why are we worried about them?

Cookie
Cookie
9 years ago

Um, I’m trying to figure out exactly what this has to do with the previous mixed-chics post? I’m a little insulted that this women felt the need to “school” everyone on mixed-race identity while willfully ignoring the racial mixing if African-Americans and racial identity in America.

Race is social construct, not a scientific formula. There’s a reason why our mixed-race president self-identifies as black. She seems to conflates heritage and culture with race. Also her breakdown of slave mu

Vick
Vick
9 years ago
Reply to  Cookie

I agree that notion really annoyed me to the core.

Cookie
Cookie
9 years ago
Reply to  Cookie

My post got cut off, I meant to add… She mentions slave mixing in such a dismissive manner. Coming from the UK, she may not appreciate that most of the black people here are not 1st, 2nd, 3rd, generation immigrants. We’ve been in this country for centuries and like our counterparts who were enslaved in the Caribbean and Central and South America, we experienced considerable racial mixing–developing our own unique culture and standards for racial identity. America’s racial definitions are informed by our history. If you ever watched a Henry Louis Gates special you’d understand how complex black American racial identity is and… Read more »

sarah
9 years ago
Reply to  Cookie

chuuuuuch!

Honeybrown
Honeybrown
9 years ago
Reply to  Cookie

PREACH

Ry
Ry
9 years ago
Reply to  Cookie

Why are products like mixed-chics featured in Essence instead of Marie Clare.”

ooooh say it girl!!

Ericka
Ericka
9 years ago
Reply to  Cookie

Sooo true!

Zoopath
Zoopath
9 years ago
Reply to  Ericka

+1

honeybrown1976
honeybrown1976
9 years ago

Her opinion is already null and void simply because she’s in the UK with an experience that is unlike race in America. So, I’m trying to figure out what is her point? The Twitter “debate” refers to an event in America with ties to colorism. No one’s talking about biracial heritage; but, rather colorism, which exists.

So, what was the point?

Baby Brown
Baby Brown
9 years ago
Reply to  honeybrown1976

Those are HER ISSUES!!!!!

Jojo
Jojo
9 years ago

I think the author is addressing the reader comments related to the article about Mixed Chicks’ tweet, as well as comments made towards people that identify themselves as bi-racial or mixed race.

From what I read, it seems that her intent was to clarify what she believes are misconceptions about persons that are mixed-race.

Completely unrelated, the girl in the picture has such a cute baby face.

Kurly Kels
9 years ago
Reply to  Jojo

The model does have a cute baby face! Somewhere someone’s attributing that post to that face..lol.

Anonda
Anonda
9 years ago
Reply to  Kurly Kels

Yeah the model is a cutie tootie. Her hair color is pretty too!

Sweet Chic Geek
9 years ago

The connection was made early on; the author clearly stated that she was motivated by the vitriol in the comments, which I couldn’t even bring myself to comment on. It seems any time there is opportunity for division it’s taken, which is just sad. Someone’s personal experiences are their own, and how they choose to identify themselves is their own prerogative. Culture plays an impact, and nobody should feel pressured to deny one side or the other. Why is it such a stretch to embrace the diversity? Society at large may see brown skin or curly hair, but those features cannot… Read more »

racedoesnotmatter
racedoesnotmatter
9 years ago

It’s my understanding that slaves were traded just about everywhere but once slavery ended in other countries the slaves integrated/mixed into those societies where as in America segregation/jim crow laws were implemented and that’s the major difference. I don’t know, but were they lynching and hunting black ppl for sport in other countries?

LDub512
LDub512
9 years ago

Actually that’s not entirely true. I am a Caribbean and Latin American historian. There are two ways to think about this: (1) Some countries did continue to discriminate against people of African descent. While it may not necessarily have been by law it was engrained in these socieites to treat African descended people as lesser-than socially/by custom. For example, in Cuba when slavery was finally over white Cubans lorded over black and mulatto Cubans basically saying, “Oh you all should be soo grateful to us because we let you be free.” Some black and mulatto Cubans united to form a political… Read more »

Ericka
Ericka
9 years ago
Reply to  LDub512

i just read about Independiente Partido de Color (had never heard about them). And I totally agree with you that many people do not know about the discrimination in Latin America. Now I find as a Black woman traveling I have had no problems (then men tend to love us, lol), but I have seen the men definitely treated different. I’ve heard of Brazilian universities having a quota on how many people of color are allowed. In the Dominican Republic even if a Haitian woman has a child on their soil, the child is not considered a citizen. I don’t… Read more »

Sweet Chic Geek
9 years ago

Really? That’s a pretty optimistic world view, but while there may be subtle differences between different countries and cultures, it’s still very much present. Segregation is seen within many countries and cultures upon the end of slavery. Just because the institution has been destroyed, doesn’t mean the mindset is quick to follow. Few people want to give up their sense of entitlement, and they certainly don’t want to mix with ‘lessers’.

It’s deeply entrenched everywhere, even amongst ourselves.. which is the most disturbing aspect of all.

Lucy Khanom
Lucy Khanom
9 years ago

Hey, Makiya! 🙂 Thanks a lot for taking your time to write this, I found it very interesting and this has helped me know you that little bit more now. Having known you for nearly two years, I know you as simply ‘Makiya’. Not ‘that mixed race girl’ or ‘that girl with the funky hair, I wonder where she’s from?’. I couldn’t quite understand why these girls were so fascinated by your hair (your hair is fantastic!) and I think I can pin that down to the fact I am 100% Asian (even though people always say otherwise) and up… Read more »

AnonCA
AnonCA
9 years ago
Reply to  Lucy Khanom

Um, just for the record Lucy, there is no such thing as looking “mixed race” and unless you saw the girl on the train with her mom and dad, you shouldn’t assume that she was. The lady who stared may have been envious, but you dont’ know anything about the other girl. I think my main issue with this article is that I did find a lot of the assumptions to be incorrect, and definitely they were ignorant of the historical and social issues that relate to race in the U.S. (Number one being that people who are “totally” black are only… Read more »

Baby Brown
Baby Brown
9 years ago
Reply to  Lucy Khanom

you sure can’t comment on it Lucy, you sound every bit of 17, so i’m gonna be easy. I was in the Asian Market yesterday, and as i’m looking around i wander over to a display counter which is FULL of SKIN WHITENING BARS!!! On each and every bar there was an Asian woman. I’m thinkin to myself.…..why on earth are they (Asians)trying to whiten their skin. My point is, EVERY people has THEIR OWN ISSUES.….Ours is displayed more in the forefront. Ours generally speaking, NOT mine.

Denis Denis
Denis Denis
9 years ago
Reply to  Lucy Khanom

What did this help you to understand more about? This is one person’s opinion and experience, it’s limited and narrow as to what it will teach you about the complex race relations between human beings. Coming to observe and opine on what you think you’ve learned is baffling to me. Not only do you sound incredibly ignorant but also I wonder what things are ‘happening all the time’ solely in the black community, in your opinion that do not happen elsewhere? If you’re 100% asian then you will know that the asian community has their issues so why come in… Read more »

rinab
rinab
9 years ago
Reply to  Denis Denis

wowzers!

Dolores
Dolores
9 years ago

another divisive topic…

sasha
sasha
9 years ago

I think the article makes some valid points. However, as she noted the discourse about “mixed-race” is largely based on the culture. Race itself is a social construction. My primary “beefs” with the entire mixed-race saga are: (1) If race is socially contructed, how can mixed race not be the same? (2) Why is this issue always put at the door step of Blacks? I think identify politics are short-lived. I am a black female and that has personally, socially, and political meaning. I rarely see persons who identify as mixed race creating discourse about the social and political meanings… Read more »

So tired of this
So tired of this
9 years ago
Reply to  sasha

OMG I agree with you WHOLEHEARTEDLY!! Mixed people (those that are mixed with black) tend to “dump” their emotions on black people… but I don’t EVER see them having the same discussions with their other half, whether it’s white, asian or hispanic. And that REALLY bothers me. Black people absorb so much vitriol from other ethnicities, and we also absorb it from bi-racial people. And I agree that often mixed race people stop at, “I want to be identified as mixed, not black.” Beyond that I don’t see a lot of thoughtful discourse on what it is to be bi-racial.… Read more »

sasha
sasha
9 years ago

Exactly. It’s hardly the fault of Blacks that the mixed-race discourse is often seen as a extension of the Black discourse. No one group is subject to this. Asian, Hispanic, Native Americans etc..I never read of individual identifying as mixed race bringing mixed race issues to their door steps. I beginning to believe that Blacks should stop engaging in these dialogues. We should refuse to be a home or start for their discourse.

Kurly Kels
9 years ago

Well said *rofl*!

LDub512
LDub512
9 years ago

I totally agree with this comment and the next. This is something that is always dumped at African-American’s door. When are bi-racial people going to start complaining to white people about their feelings? I always suspect its because (a) they know white society at large is NOT tring to hear that and (b) some bi-racial people actually do not want to identify with blackness because they feel like society treats black people like they have cooties so they want to be “other”! (1) I think it is important to acknowledge the fact that identity is a two-way construction. It is… Read more »

Kris
Kris
9 years ago

I’m not much of a commenter on this website, but your comment really gave me the urge to speak on the matter. I am really bothered that you feel the mixed community “dumps” their emotions on black people. Where are you getting this from? A few commenters on hair sites? How can you say that you don’t ever see them having the same discussion with their other half’s? How would you know? You obviously have no clue what you are talking about. There are websites dedicated to mixed raced/culture people (not just black and whites, but black and Asian, or… Read more »

So tired of this
So tired of this
9 years ago
Reply to  Kris

So how about this: You just tell me what you want me to say and believe, and I’ll say it and believe it. Because I am so TIRED of this! I’m not going off of stereotypes, I am going off of FAMILY MEMBERS and FRIENDS I have who are bi-racial and feel the need to remind me every time they get a chance, every time the conversation turns to skin color, every time the conversation turns to hair texture that they are part white. I don’t know what else I can do for them… They have this obsessive desire to remind me… Read more »

Rachel
Rachel
9 years ago

Did you base your whole idea of tantrum-throwing mixed people on your family members andfriends only ? That doesnt seem very opened minded to me. I have to agree with Kris, why should we forget the other half ? Is there some kind of race war going on and we have to take sides ? That doesn’t seem very tolerant. And if it bothers you so much, tell them. Or just refuse to get into those conversations. Maybe they remind you that because you refuse to acknowledge it in the 1st place ? (Then again, I’m not saying that’s what you do,… Read more »

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
9 years ago
Reply to  Kris

@Kris,

Why do you claim that you are both Hispanic and Black? Hispanic is not a race. You can be Black Hispanic, White Hispanic, Asian Hispanic. My understanding is that Hispanic (latino) is an ethnicity.

Baby Brown
Baby Brown
9 years ago

This comment is so TRUE. I have a mixed friend, black and white. When she felt like it and circumstances called for it, she acted white and vice versa. 1 thing she told me and i was shocked, she said she LIKED to discuss race topics because she KNEW it would set everybody off, come on now, MC surly knew what was gonna be the aftermath, IT’S A PUBLICITY STUNT!!!!!!

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
9 years ago

Amen!! Preach!

racedoesnotmatter
racedoesnotmatter
9 years ago

I’m black. When I was relaxed ppl would question whether I was mixed or not, since being natural I don’t get that so much. But a person with two “black” parents can come out with wavy hair and pale skin b/c somewhere along the line that gene was present. A biracial child mixed with someone of African descent can be as brown as someone who is not mixed, so looking from the outside(skin/hair) to determine what a person is or is not…and black ppl in America come in all types of shades/textures and that’s where we get the mixed thing… Read more »

loveLee
loveLee
9 years ago

She made some good points in her post, but she is from the UK and they do see race differently there than here. I do not condone what the mixed chick company did (for publicity) but it’s done. Lesson learned think before you tweet, the company as well as the people commenting. As for me in my family i stick out like a sore thumb, growing up and the family i started with my husband. My mother is black my father mixed Puerto Rican and black. I alway thought of myself as black just very light. I don’t have the… Read more »

BrownSugahChild
9 years ago

I feel i’m going to get a lot of static about what i’m about to say, but oh well.…. THE WHOLE LIGHT SKIN VS. DARK SKIN BATTLE IS SO LAME!!!!
We’re humans and some of us may or may not have more melanin than the next human.… I wish that at some point society will put aside this debate and just be who God made us, fearfully and wonderfully made.…. #teamdesignedbytheCreator

sistarisin
sistarisin
9 years ago

While I can understand most of the author’s points, I, like some others posters have expressed, have a problem with #6 regarding most African Americans are mixed. Perhaps she doesn’t understand that some of the same (perhaps not to the extreme degree)insensitive derogatory remarks are visited upon African Americans that ‘appear’ to be of mixed race. I identify with being black or African American; however, my heritage is often questioned because of my complexion, hair, eye shape, facial features, etc. I’ve been called every negative derivative of being mixed but am not (at least by the author’s ‘standards’). I also… Read more »

b.
b.
9 years ago
Reply to  sistarisin

Yes, yes on this point specifically: “Perhaps she doesn’t understand that some of the same (perhaps not to the extreme degree)insensitive derogatory remarks are visited upon African Americans that ‘appear’ to be of mixed race.”

People treat others all kinds of ways based on appearances, whether the assumptions are correct or not. Looks and race/ethnicity don’t always correlate. Even so, the reactions of others based on those looks is what affects our lives.

Loving Natural
Loving Natural
9 years ago

So, what are her thoughts on the “MC” tweets again????? I think I missed her response to the tweets somewhere here :/

ebony
ebony
9 years ago

I consider myself as black and mixed. While I identify with black people and care deeply about black issues, I also have had the experiences of a mixed person and I must acknowledge that. I am half black, 1/4 white and 1/4 lebanese. I wish I knew all of where I came from. I thought the post was good except I’d disagree with the notion that black people who are not mixed can not identify with their ancestors. I understand what she was trying to say, but it was poorly worded and delivered. And to answer the questions above, mixed… Read more »

ebony
ebony
9 years ago
Reply to  ebony

I’d like to add that yes I know there are racist white people. But seriously, if you’re letting them stop you then you’re only stopping yourself. Usually they’re hiding behind a computer screen…seriously, they’re not that serious.

sasha
sasha
9 years ago
Reply to  ebony

Good points. I think the danger in making the mixed race identity accessible to persons with different raced parents and not grandparents and grandparents is that it once again supports a system that needs to be dismantled. I understand the spirit of the argument that the experience is different for a one generational mixed race person than that one a second or third generational mixed race person, however, who gets to decides which experience is more authentic or valid? It’s the same as saying who can and who cannot be Black. This is why there needs to be adiscourse about… Read more »

AnonCA
AnonCA
9 years ago
Reply to  sasha

@Ebony, how do you not recognize that the ability to say that you don’t see color or don’t care about race is a PRIVILEGE that only the majority can claim. Why would a white person care about race when at no point in their life will their race adversely affect them. You sound like the white people who claim that black people make everything “racial.” Well, darling, when you pull stories of white men getting shot for their wallet being mistaken for a gun, being pulled over for driving while black, or white men who can get beaten on camera and… Read more »

Baby Brown
Baby Brown
9 years ago
Reply to  AnonCA

SHEESE MAMA.….I’m glad you handled that.…i could go on.….In case she doesn’t know, black people still get tied on to the rear of a truck and DRAGGED!!!!!!! WHO ARE WE TO CALL THEM RACISTS??!!!

ebony
ebony
9 years ago
Reply to  AnonCA

I never said black people were whiny. But yes, we do have a tendency to turn everything into a debate about race and sometimes it’s completely irrational and unnecessary. I’ll give you an example off the top of my head…a white girl covered Willow Smiths Whip My Hair on her guitar and the comments exploded into a race debate about white ppl stealing black music and how she was racist. We are race obsessed and some of us use white privilege as an excuse to not try or get ahead. Like I said racism is institutionalized, its still a huge… Read more »

AnonCA
AnonCA
9 years ago
Reply to  ebony

Yeah, that sucks. Sometimes white people get attacked by angry black people. I never said that doesn’t happen. But it happens far less often than the other way around, and it doesn’t disprove anything that I said about white privilege. I think it is far more insidious when people who have sworn to serve and protect kill you. It is more disturbing when people who are paid to educated you do a crappy job because they don’t think that you are “worth” it. None of these examples demonstrate that race affects white people’s lives on a DAILY basis. It doesn’t… Read more »

brunettefury
brunettefury
9 years ago
Reply to  ebony

The incidents you mentioned are individual incidents that occur due to the way blacks in the US are treated in the first place. Individual anecdotes don’t even compare to the level on which people of color are treated unfairly. Not to mention, a few rotten apples can’t account for black people as a whole and can’t explain away anyone’s privilege. For every group of black youth that get away with doing something shady, there are dozens more locked up in the prison system for simply being black. More than likely, if a white man went to the station to report… Read more »

Baby Brown
Baby Brown
9 years ago
Reply to  ebony

Sit on that for a moment???? Are you serious!!!???? Yes, they are crimes, but how can you compare a few instances as opposed to YEARS OF VICIOUSNESS!!!!????? And you really think you have a valid point!!!! Sis, I’m NOT gonna take you there! Stop it! Just for the record, I am in NO WAY condoning this, This is not the time or place to have this discussion, even if I wanted to. But if I did, TRUST ME…You can’t handle this! Sit on what?!

Cookie
Cookie
9 years ago
Reply to  ebony

So blacks are obsessed with race, but mixed-raced people aren’t? Most people of color don’t have the privilege of ignoring race–including those who are mixed. This is the reason why these types of discussions always find a home in forums like this. You’re right, white America by and large isn’t talking about race, because they don’t have to. Unfortunately, we live in a society where the perspectives and experiences of white people are the cultural norm. If that were not the case, this website wouldn’t exist. So yes, race does matter and by making the entry fee for whiteness purity,… Read more »

brunettefury
brunettefury
9 years ago
Reply to  ebony

I’m not sure what you’re trying to get at with the statement: “Mixed people talked about their issues with black people because black people are the ones obsessed with race and identity in America. Sorry, I know thats unpopular to say, but white people just don’t give a damn anymore on an individual basis.” Yes, white people don’t give a damn about race, because it doesn’t affect them. And fyi, this is sometimes referred to as color-blind racism, it’s a very subtle and insidious form of racism that is unfortunately the dominant racial ideology in this country (and elsewhere). This… Read more »

brunettefury
brunettefury
9 years ago
Reply to  brunettefury

There’s also aversive racism (which relates to this color-blind ideology). This is racism that operates on a more subconscious level. Since racism is institutionalized, those born in a place of privilege have inherently racist attitudes that would need to be examined in order to be combated…and most white people don’t want to deal with the notion that they could possibly harbor racist feelings. http://encyclopedia.jrank.org/articles/pages/5976/Aversive-Racism.html Aversive racism is a form of contemporary racism that manifests at the individual level. Compared to the traditional form of racism, aversive racism operates, often unconsciously, in subtle and indirect ways. People whose behavior is characterized… Read more »

Shirley
Shirley
9 years ago
Reply to  brunettefury

co-signed.

ebony
ebony
9 years ago
Reply to  brunettefury

I actually co sign with everything you just said. But commenters above complained that mixed people bring their mixed problems to black people. And that was what I was addressing. Some (and I do mean some) black people make insidious comments about mixed people as though their not people too. Or they assume we think we’re superior or we don’t want to identify with our black side. That’s not true, in fact its quite the contrary.

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
9 years ago
Reply to  ebony

,

What do Whites say about mixed people? Are you having a dialog with White folks? Since you are part White, do you have a problem with their racist comments? Or are Whites lovey dovey towards mixed people?

By the way, if Whites are accepting of mixed people, why don’t you all just call yourselves White? Why bother calling yourselves Black? Join the folks who love you.

ElectricFeel
ElectricFeel
9 years ago

Colorism runs so deep.
I’m tired of seeing this redundant “skin color debate”
on this site. It never gets anywhere, honestly.

Can we please just talk about hair?!

sarah
9 years ago
Reply to  ElectricFeel

i thought we were… 😉

Alexis
Alexis
9 years ago

I believe that because she is from the UK, she doesn’t understand American concepts of race. “Race” is socially constructed, a man made idea! It’s nothing biological at all.I believe she speaks from the UK point if view, because mixed people are recognized has that. Due to the one drop rule, Mixed People in America are more than likely considered black. Her tone of the essay, could be viewed as very negative toward Black Americans. Now about #6, she should really pick up a book and read about slavery in America. A little over 80% of Black Americans have a… Read more »

messymely
9 years ago
Reply to  Alexis

i completely agree with you, i’m from the UK aswell,and often ‘mixed’ people do feel being mixed is more superior to being black… but unfortunately to them you cant always look at a mixed person and know that they are mixed…they may just look black.….thats because they are… yes i said it… sorry mixed people YOUR BLACK lol, but its not all you are…but it is what you are, so dnt get mad… embrace it.. i feel these type of posts are useless

Rachel
Rachel
9 years ago
Reply to  messymely

I doubt the majority of mixed people believe they’re superior, unless you can tell me you’ve run a poll or know all the mixed people in the UK, I’ll have to disagree.

And there’s not need to say sorry, we are black just as much as we are the other race 🙂

messymely
9 years ago

I feel that articles like this often create a slight divide in the black…or ‘black-containing’(if u are part black or something) race which isn’t originally there. In Most cases mixed-race people have no issue relating to the ‘black side’ or being defined as ‘black’, as it may be all they can be defined as.….there’s too many different variations of black people to start to differentiate which is black and which is mixed, its just unnecessary and pointless. Many full black people may look mixed and visa-versa…then its an issue of what does ‘look mixed’ mean?…you see… pointless…just deal with you… Read more »

BrownEyes99
9 years ago

Just want to say that I found this writer’s comments (and many of those who responded) very thought provoking. Also, being from the UK its really nice to see a UK writer featured on the site, and a global debate. There is an interesting site link here with some articles on the mixed experience in the UK that some others might be interested in.

gs
gs
9 years ago

I find it really interesting that the author writes in her first reason that “The term mixed-race does not apply to skin colour” and doesn’t include the very reason why all of this fallout happened in the first place. The company “mixed chicks” made this very assumption when they chose to tweet #teamlightskin and got called on the carpet for it. Granted, its the company’s business to shape their brand however they wish. Other companies do this in not so subtle ways with who they choose for their advertising. It just that more irritating when its coming from someone that… Read more »

Blatina
Blatina
8 years ago
Reply to  gs

Why is it nobody mentions how “offensive/exclusionary” the title Dark and Lovely can be, but everyone gets all up in arms over the title Mixed Chicks? Imagine the fallout/uproar if we dared have a product called Light and Lovely! Why is it that the moment mixed people want something for themselves, suddenly it’s offensive, but never when monoracial (read: Black) people want something for themselves? Ridiculous.…mixed women should be able to have pride in who they are and their heritage with no apologies, I know I make none for myself (proud Mulata here!) . We are MIXED, it is what… Read more »

Tami
Tami
9 years ago

bottom line for me is that the “Mixed Chicks” brand should Not have taken part in that “light vs. dark” debate on twitter. It was childish,disrespectful, and uncalled for. I am however, glad i found out this is how they feel befor i spent my money with them.

emma
emma
9 years ago

I say, define yourself as what you want, just don’t deny what you are or are not. Meaning, don’t say you’re German if your great great great great great great granddad was German but everyone else down the line is Philiphino. Don’t deny your family history but don’t say you are 100% something that is really more like .4 %. On the other hand, do not claim to be 100% black when your dad is Portuguese. No one race is better although historically some have been given privilege. Also, because the author is from the UK does not nullify her points.… Read more »

Big Sister
Big Sister
9 years ago
Reply to  emma

@Emma , in response to the post i think you’ve made the most sense. Others have picked up that this post is not an apples to apples argument on the twitter backlash. Most of the responders seem to be in the frame of mind that all american black persons grow up in a culturally black american household (note the adjective inversion). That is not the case. If it were so then how would your defense that when a mixed race person, who has grown up with culturally competing identities both in their head, their familial relationships, and from society, should… Read more »

rosie
rosie
9 years ago

1.)..Being mixed-race is not always a simple case of being ½ one race and ½ another. There are many racial combinations and percentages of racial mixtures…”

So there’s no percentage to qualify for mixedness.…

6.) Basically, it doesn’t need tracing to find where the mixture started. Someone being 1/60th Cherokee Indian will not have the same experiences as someone who is ½ Black, ¼ White and ¼ Asian.”

.…But now there is?

Anyway, I think some people choose to feel offended.

Anonda
Anonda
9 years ago
Reply to  rosie

Lol thank you Rosie! You made the point far more succinctly than I. I hope the author reads this and realizes how hypocritical and circular that argument was. As another person said, one experience is no more authentic than the other. Is its different…yes! But don’t tell me that my ancestry doesn’t matter as much in the present day as yours. If we are going to truly embrace diversity, then let’s open our arms wide, let people define themselves, and not invalidate others experience with that tired “your blues aint like mine” ish. Author I hope you read this and understand that… Read more »

Jasmin
9 years ago

I’m late (long work day + Pacific time!), but I think that what the author (perhaps because she lives in the UK or maybe because she’s uninformed) is missing is that “White” in the US is an umbrella term that represents power and privilege. It is not a purely cultural identifier in the way that nationalities/ethnicities tend to be (e.g., French, Latino, Filipina, Hausa). People aren’t walking around Europe uniting themselves under the “White” title–half of those countries hate each other! And “Whites” in America are only united in terms of having privilege, that’s why the Irish “became White” to… Read more »

ineyo
ineyo
9 years ago

Yaba yaba yaba.… anyways, what hairstyles are ya’ll wearing this winter? Lol

rosie
rosie
9 years ago
Reply to  ineyo

Trying to commit myself to some creative yet doable updos.…Almost ready wig-it-out.

ineyo
ineyo
9 years ago
Reply to  rosie

I hear you… that’s what I’ve been doing!!! Wearing wigs, but I am tired of it. I wish the weather would let up

merry
merry
9 years ago

i didn’t read all the comments, but it seems i’m one of the only ones who feels patronized by this post — as a black/american.

that’s all, before i go say something untoward and just not nice. lol.

girl needs to go somewhere.

merry
merry
9 years ago

and isn’t the title of this blog — black girl with long hair?

why bother to fill it with chatter from people who don’t regard themselves as black in the first place? ugh.

ebony
ebony
9 years ago
Reply to  merry

its exactly these types of comments I’m talking about.

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
9 years ago
Reply to  merry

@Merry,

That’s exactly what I asked in my post. Great minds think alike (smile).

Shirley
Shirley
9 years ago

I think someone from the UK disparaging the history of African Americans is wrong. This woman contradicted herself through-out her entire rant. Her ignorance shined brightly in the #6. Is she serious? I’m speechless at the level of ignorance. Yes, ALL African Americans are mixed, some are more mixed than others, it would be impossible for a AFrican AMerican to be 100% pure African. I for one don’t get into claiming races I can’t prove, I’m not obsess with White, or native American heritages. I really wish bi-racial/mixed people would get over themselves, stop hating your black heritage, you are… Read more »

Shirley
Shirley
9 years ago

Advise to Mixed UK woman: Speak on what you know about, and not what you think you know. Simply put…“STAY IN YOUR OWN DAMN LANE.” Black and mixed people in the UK need to worry about acquiring political and economic power, instead of trying to masked their feelings of inferiority when compared to African Americans, the most educated, successful African descended people in the history of humankind.

Michelle Hubbard
Michelle Hubbard
9 years ago
Reply to  Shirley

Wow..this statement is true, yet very harshly stated. All of this has to do with status and power and it is sad. I love variety and all people.

Toni
Toni
9 years ago
Reply to  Shirley

Wow the tone of this discussion is becoming extremely combative and offensive. Shirley I understand you may feel insulted by the OP in the article but this —->“the most educated, successful African descended people in the history of humankind” Really? Do you need to stoop to this level? I don’t agree with you at all but it is also sad to see that one voice in the UK, could bring out such venom and animosity towards those of us who are black and non-American. Black people are never so happy as when we are being divisive and one upping each… Read more »

1Nikki
1Nikki
9 years ago

Just because the company’s name is mixed chicks and this girl happens to be biracial — isn’t at all relevant to the issue at hand. I didn’t really care enough about her opinion to even read through it all. I’m sorry just because Mixed Chicks made a fool out of themselves last week doesn’t mean I needed this woman’s perspective because she’s biracial. She annoyed me especially when she talked about how different it is to be a mixed race person presently as opposed to being just black & you happen to be mixed up generations ago. Ok sure I’m… Read more »

Cherie
9 years ago
Reply to  1Nikki

Girl! GET OUT OF MY HEAD! I can’t add anymore to what you’ve posted accept for AMEN.

noname
noname
9 years ago
Reply to  1Nikki

ummm.. what are the privileges, exactly? i’m curious, because as a multiracial woman, i guess i’m still waiting for mine. i’ve been called every name in the book and been discriminated against by all parts of me… and the type of teasing i endured growing up wasn’t something that either of my parents or anyone else i knew was equipped to deal with… actually my dad (who is black) used to joke about how easy i would have it… umm, again, easy compared with what? my hair certainly isn’t easy (which is why i love this site!) and neither is… Read more »

1Nikki
1Nikki
9 years ago
Reply to  noname

Thank you Cherie, And noname I don’t claim to know what an experience of a biracial person would be I acknowledge that there must be downsides but at the same time on a general level the privilege is in the fact that you’re not 100% black because black in America is like the lowest thing on the totem pole. Yes I too have had the experiences of being teased in school & not fitting in, & being called white girl just because most of the girls were darker than me. And I’ve felt like I was an outsider and not accepted… Read more »

49453
49453
9 years ago

Am I the only one uncomfortable with having a picture posted of a woman who is not the author of this post? For something that is such a personal perspective and ascribed to an individual, it seems best to go without the image.

trackback

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April
April
9 years ago

Sorry you may have some valid points but the min you said some african americans have some mixture sorry you are incorrect. MOST have 12% or more mixture this slave culture in american was very expansive and devastating it was not one slave master out of 100 it was 90 out of 100. I got it you are british but please know what you are talking about with regards to our history in american. I am very light with 3b-3c hair my sister is very light with 4a-4b hair both our parents are black, actually growing up I never met… Read more »

REX
REX
9 years ago

Like most of you I was nodding my head until the author got to point #6. I believe that people should be able to self-identify. There is nothing wrong with a bi-racial person wanting to identify with all of their parts. But sometimes they are the first people to call out others for doing the same thing. My mother’s family are creole. That side of the family comes in all shades, from lily white to the darkest of black. My father is half native american, but considers himself to be a black man. All of my ancestries show up in… Read more »

OnceUponaTime
9 years ago

I can’t believe people are still fighting/arguing over all this nonsense even to this day.. Why so much anger? Why does anyone care what anyone calls themselves? Light skin or dark skin doesn’t tell anyone anything about anyone’s heritage.. how do you know that dark skinned “Sista” isn’t an aborigine from Australia? Or that light skinned “sista” is a tanned European? You won’t know until you ask, and even then oftentimes people give you grief when you answer honestly. What’s the point of being honest when you aren’t believed?

sasha
sasha
9 years ago

Will some one explain who has the authority to decide or police who can identify as mixed raced?

Indigowaters
Indigowaters
9 years ago

It’s funny how the OP was quick to say don’t make me choose sides, but was quick to break down how “different” it is to be mixed today than back in the day (and even into fractions at that). What about those of us who look like “normal” African-Americans yet come from Hispanic backgrounds yet aren’t accepted in the Hispanic community? YOU wouldn’t know what that’s like because you’re in a different situation. Do we all now get to write a column on how hard it is to live in a society where we’re not accepted? No, we just keep… Read more »

Avaspeaks
Avaspeaks
9 years ago
Reply to  Indigowaters

I think some were offended because Mixed Chicks jumped into a debate that they really had no clue what was going on. They were just marketing their products. Of course they were going to say Teamlightskin, they are light skin but I think it was just a bad marketing ploy at the wrong time. As far as the rest of us, Mixed Chicks was and really still is geared toward textures that is common in biracial people with certain types of hair. That was on their website. WE as African Americans decided to use their products because they were geared toward… Read more »

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
9 years ago

Don’t want to sound rude, but if mixed women are not Black, why do I have to read their posts on “Black girl long hair”? Isn’t this website for Black women? Why not start a website called “mixed women long hair” for mixed women?

Blatina
Blatina
8 years ago

We actually do have plenty of websites, like mulatto.org, confessions of a mixed girl, mixed american life, mixedfolks.com, and the list goes on. The only reason “mixed issues” get posted on black sites, is because, let’s face it, a lot of Black people with minor mixture from generations ago wanna be on the mixed boat, for the very same reasons they get mad when truly ambiguous mixed people mention they’re non-Black heritage, it’s because of the perceived societal privilege therein. That’s why.…

Shaneika
Shaneika
9 years ago

The UK does have race issues, ever heard of the black and white twins or black couple white baby.

Kristen
9 years ago

Great topic. I have to agree with every point you made. Although, I personally feel that labels period are to blame for all ignorance and confusion. In the U.S. people worry too much about classification whether it be race, gender, sexuality etc. It’s all bologna! We need to just focus on our pronouns “I and Me”. I know there is no chance of eliminating labels altogether however, we try to organize and categorize things too much and it is causing us to lose sight of what is important; Not trying to figure out what we are, but understand who we… Read more »

jasmine
jasmine
9 years ago

i agree with everything she said

mids
mids
8 years ago
Reply to  jasmine

I agree too, nothing in this article was put of line and I concur with everything said. Perfect and could not have said it better myself

Gabrielle
Gabrielle
9 years ago

Hey people, I personally know the writer makiya because she is my cousin. stop hating!! this is why this was written in the first place. I am black, not bi-racial and I know some of my ancestors were white way way way back down the line but both my parents are black and this is what I identify with. I have read most of the comments and there are several valid points along with many stupid ones. I know a girl called Lucy who commented and she was slated by several readers, what she said may have come across negatively to… Read more »

Come On People
Come On People
9 years ago
Reply to  Gabrielle

The thing is that most black americans, it is not that having mixed heritage is in the distant distant past. Many of them, it is in withing the last 3 generations. When you grow up with having grand parents and great grand parents that are of mix race, you do want to identify with them. When you know these people and their issues were passed down to you and affect your family, you can’t say that their lives have not been affected by the mixed race controversy. And just because a person with parents of the same race have the… Read more »

Miki
Miki
8 years ago
Reply to  Come On People

AMAZING response!! I think that is a fair assessment of American Blacks. Who gets to decide how far back you can claim a mixed ancestry? Am I to ignore some of my non African features because they came from a non black great grandparent? My relatives who look very non black but are equally mixed as me are no longer Black American now? I’m sure they’ve had to defend the,selves way more than I have. The context of race is a unique situation and it cannot be explained in one editorial. It’s not even fair for Mikaya to compare her… Read more »

mids
mids
8 years ago
Reply to  Come On People

I think you kinda missed the point of the article though I agree that all these categories should just be chucked. Now if you’re a 16th of something that’s only 6.25% and an eighth is 12.5%. The 8th is likely to affect maybe your eye color and very minimally your hair texture if the other 87.5 % is of black west African descent. The mixed article was referring mostly to your black and white mix.

Farah
Farah
9 years ago

SAD TIMES MUCHOS VENOM IN SOME OF THESE POSTS! I’m BLACK, HAPPY & PROUD of my mixed origins!:)

Come On People
Come On People
9 years ago

Also, I know a woman that is techinally white because both her parents are white. However, since her great-great-grandmother was mixed she looked mixed. She is mixed, she had many issues growing up because of the way she looked. She chose to identify herself with black because she was not accepted by her family. So tell me is she not or is she mixed? According to the writer of this article she is not and she has no right to identify as mixed race. That is what i mean by the complexity of racial identity in the US. So please… Read more »

girl
girl
8 years ago
Reply to  Come On People

She was saying that in response to the people who try to say that to mixed people in order to delegitimize mixed people. Do not take her words out of context, come on.

Read again
Read again
8 years ago
Reply to  Come On People

That is actually not what the writer said, so you can calm down.

Mina
Mina
9 years ago

As a woman of mixed race I just want to thank Makiya for writing everything I wanted to say. At some point we all have to learn to define *ourselves* rather than let society define us. It’s no wonder that so many have the misconception that all mixed race or “mulatto” men and women must be confused about their own race. We’re constantly being given contradictory labels. Growing up I was alwas reminded by my black peers that I was black. “You know you black, right?” Then with the same breath, what was I called? “White girl.” I don’t think… Read more »

Carmen
Carmen
9 years ago
Reply to  Mina

Agreed. In Britain we have the option of mixed on the census.

Cyan
Cyan
9 years ago

A great post and it made me think of how we judge each other and this thing call race and all the issues it brings will never seem to go away… how sad!!

Chinese guy with issues
Chinese guy with issues
9 years ago

What about racist homesexual gay people? Has anybody mentioned them? I dont think so.

Doreen
Doreen
8 years ago

The reason why nobody has mentioned racist homosexual gay people is that this is a site for Gorgeous Black Women with Long Hair. You areW either confused and has not read anything or you have accidentally come onto this website accidentally.Whilst you are here, read and educate yourself, you might just like it.

n
n
7 years ago

Abductees into slavery into the Americas represented multiple nations. I have read Haitian accounts describing that.

A
A
9 years ago

I think identity is a complex topic. The identity you have for yourself and the one you are given by various societies changes. While I can agree with SOME points I cannot say I agree with everything. You seem to be IGNORING the FACT that black people are an extremely diverse group which encompasses many different looks and genetics. Being ‘black’ is a racial grouping which spreads from the lightest of skins to the darkest with variant features not only if your mixed. You say mixed people come in all shades and features well so do black people. Thus in… Read more »

Deborah
9 years ago
Reply to  A

I’m mixed-raced and so very proud of this. My mother is black and my father is white‑i will never call myself black or white because i don’t look like either race for sure and HELLO? How can i be when i have two parents that gave me EQUAL numbers of genes?

This post is AMAZING! And so true. You’re correct in everything you say, you go girl!

Deborah
9 years ago
Reply to  A

i don’t thin any mixed raced person can look black or white. As you say, looking black or white is more than just a skin colour 🙂

mids
mids
8 years ago
Reply to  A

Tyson is only 1/4 mixed, we’re talking about half-black and half something else. Black is a term used for people of specific black west African descent. A term used to describe the slaves with kinky hair, and dark skin. You don’t understand that the reason “black” people are mixed is because there mixed. You’re missing the point. Black people don’t have these so called varying features if they aren’t mixed

Kendra
Kendra
9 years ago

I don’t think that the writer should take offense if some one corrects her on the diversity of African Americans/Mixed Raced People in the US. She is British so I’m sure that has something to do with her views which is fine. But I agree with the posters who are disagreeing with her about her point number 6 “All black people are mixed anyway”. I do think it’s wrong to use that phrase as a way of denying a mixed race person their mixed status. (I get her point) But she is unaware that it is a FACT and not LEGEND… Read more »

BrownEyedBeauty
BrownEyedBeauty
9 years ago
Reply to  Kendra

I agree with most of what you stated, but very few Black Americans have Native American ancestry. There is a small minority of people in the U.S. that do. Some Native Americans, depending on their location, have intermingled with other groups but the majority have not. Many Native Americans do not accept blacks either. There is a beauty queen named Radmilla Cody who is part African American, part Native American…she is gorgeous. But Native American people will not accept her as being one of them. They simply see her as a Black woman. They don’t care that one of her parents… Read more »

Carmen
Carmen
9 years ago

I agree 100000%. You put it perfectly.

Miki
Miki
8 years ago

Until you can DNA test all Black Americans you do not have the authority to claim who has what ancestery. It’s true a lot of Native tribes don’t accept Blacks, but it’s more so because they want to whitewash a lot of their history in order to assimilate than it is an absence of truth. Just as you wish to be accepted for who you are, please don’t judge and diminish pieces of who others are as well.

Cacey
Cacey
8 years ago

you completely missed the point. please read. she said that most black americans have mixed race ancestry, which is fact. she did not, however, say that most black americans were mixed specifically with native american- she used that particular group as an example, though. and for the record, my great great grandmother WAS one quarter native american. so it does happen and not all of us are ignorant of our heritage. and i have white ancestors as well but i identify as black because my immediate family identifies as such. i’m certain i’m not an isolated case. i rest my case.

mids
mids
8 years ago

Most black Americans are not mixed. When the author says mixed she means at leat 1/2 something else. I’m around 1/4 mixed and most black Americans aren’t even 1/4 mixed either. Many are 1/8 and some aren’t at all. Not all white slave owners reproduced with their slaves.

Blatina
Blatina
8 years ago
Reply to  mids

^^^Exactly, 100% Agreed

Honey-coated
Honey-coated
9 years ago
Reply to  Kendra

Ya did ur homework, “pat urself on the Back” right now!! C‑Span with The Black agenda, The First Eve narrated by Danny Glover. 90% of African-Americans have Native-American blood whether they want it or not. Some blacks do not even know anything about themselves. As soon as I get the name of the book a white man wrote about why they despise the black man so much I will put it in my reply 4 u. I can give u a taste of it ” He said the reason is because the black man changes the whole landscape” . The white… Read more »

Cacey
Cacey
8 years ago
Reply to  Kendra

i totally agree with you, though i know this is more than a year late. and i’m gonna go to the extent of saying something that may make other people mad but i don’t care. people from other countries love to come to the united states and speculate as to what’s wrong with american blacks, which irks me because i’m always thinking to myself, “You don’t know a damn thing about what it means to grow up black in america. how DARE you come over here and try to throw onto us your own narrow perception of american blackness framed… Read more »

Doreen
Doreen
8 years ago
Reply to  Cacey

I don’t believe the author meant to rude or insulting and you are right when you say she doesn’t have any idea what it is like to grow up as a black person in the US. However where I would part with you, is when you talk about your average black person in the Britain.I’m afraid there is no such thing.We have black people from all over the world, Austrailia, the Middle East and of course the continent of Africa.There has been a prescence of black people in the UK since the Romans. The group of black people I will… Read more »

Terry
Terry
7 years ago
Reply to  Kendra

Native Americans did not mix with the African slaves. Although they enslaved Africans, they were not mixing with them. See video on this research on rumors of African DNA in America. A professor from Harvard has a show on PBS:
http://www.widwid.info/1dcdddf7b.html

BlackAngel Playah
9 years ago

I know it’s hard being mixed and all.. But it’s a little easier when you have the answer at home, right in front of you. Mom’s white.. Dad’s black, or what ever.. But there are mixed people who can’t really trace where it started. Everyone asks me “what you is..” Yeah, it’s usually stated just like that. And since there is no white person staring me in the face or indian, or asian… Just my regular old folks.. Who look a little mixed.… But then they can’t trace it either.. Far as being well adjusted as a mixed person, shut… Read more »

AnonomusME
AnonomusME
9 years ago

Though I understand that be of mixed race might pose some individual challenges (emphasis on INDIVIDUAL, and SOME!!!) just being Black in AMERICA has its own challenges. I am a black woman from America, I have no idea what the racial setting are in England cause I’ve never been, so until the author has had to live, dwell, and grown up here in America, with it’s customs, and issues she cannot make the assumption of what its like to be back or even mixed in this country!! Now to my next point…To make such a crass generalization about people who… Read more »

Gina
Gina
9 years ago

I am not mixed raced i regard my self as being black british, however my grandmother is mixed she is 1/4 black jamaican, 1/4 jamaican syrian, 1/4 white scottish & 1/4 chinese ( i know alot of mixes) born in jamaica to 2 mixed parents explaining her mix, she had my mother with a fellow jamaican man (my grandad) who is 3/4 black 1/4 white.they produced my mother who is a mixture of all those races. my mother then had me with a black man i now have 2 kids of my own with a black man and my children… Read more »

BlackCreole
BlackCreole
9 years ago

I really enjoyed reading this article. It provided interesting insight into your own unique perspective on being a mixed-race individual.True you live in Britain, so race is accepted differently. In America, as previous people commented, race is seen different; however, it’s viewed differently in various parts of our country. I live in New Orleans. Have lived here my whole life. Both my parents are Black Creoles. Not many people know what creole is, but briefly put, its a mix of African, Spanish, German, Portuguese, and/or french, and Native American. My dad’s family has been like that for generations, as has… Read more »

Deborah
9 years ago
Reply to  BlackCreole

[file]http://bglhonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/pic.abw[/file]
so if this girl lived in the USA would she be black or white?

Carmen
Carmen
9 years ago

I agree with every single point. Please watch my video about this — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErW9FJ_az0I — we must NEVER stop talking and fighting for our right to identity. A lot of blacks, though not all, would rather we shut up and call ourselves black but it’s not for them to determine who we are.

Kesha Bunche Barkulis
Kesha Bunche Barkulis
9 years ago

I just have to say as a BLACK WOMAN, a lot of you guys don’t seem to get it. I totally agree with the fact that blacks use the whole we are all mixed card all the time when discrediting immediate bi-racial peoples experience. The common thought is that there is no difference. I will tell you what the difference is. When a black person has mixed ancestry for the most part as kids they are NEVER faced having to ask, “Why is my mommy white?” or why am I not the same color as my dad? Kids can CLEARLY… Read more »

Mina
Mina
9 years ago

I see her point of view but no one ever talks about mutiracial people with mixed grandparents. I personally have a emotional struggle on the inside. My 3 of my grandparents are mixed, including black American, indian, Asian, European, and native American. Due to the time they grew up in ( 1 drop rule) they considered themselves black. I was never told that I was multiracial, I was always black because my grandparents and parents called themselves that. I stared asking questions as I got older because I saw pictures of blood related family that didn’t look like the average… Read more »

Kate
Kate
9 years ago
Reply to  Mina

Hi, to an extent I understand where you are coming from. I am also a darker skinned mixed race woman . so many people class me as black. However because my skin is a medium brown and I have long curly/wavy hair I am always asked alot of questions such as “are you black?”, “are you mixed?” and “where do you come from?” It is quite annoying but I understand that as I don’t look like the ‘typical’ mixed or black person people will be curious. I have 2 black grandparents, 1 mixed grandparent and 1 White grandparent. I had… Read more »

Amber
Amber
8 years ago
Reply to  Kate

Hi Kate, I totally agree with you! I am from Jamaica and I have a VERY mixed heritage. I am Black Jamaican, Polish Jewish, English, Irish, French, Scottish, Chinese, and East Indian heritage. As a Caribbean family we call ourselves MIXED, not BLACK. Black Caribbeans are more educated than African Americans, so we don’t classify people based on their appearance. I REFUSE to call myself “black” because of my racially mixed heritage. I was raised around Caucasians in New England but I never experienced racism. They were all good to me and I love them all. Anyway, ignorant Black Americans… Read more »

julian Marcel Felix
julian Marcel Felix
8 years ago
Reply to  Amber

you are a contradictory to your statement. Do not call black Americans ignorant as when you do this you are racist.

AC
AC
9 years ago

Well, I am a caramel-colored mixed-race person and I agree with everything in this article. I think the problem is that once you look tan, light-brown, to medium-brown, you are considered black and the stereotypical image of a mixed-race woman or man is almost ALWAYS white. So, in other words, in order for a person to be claim “mixture”, he or she would have to almost be white?!? That, in itself, is very racist. It goes back to the notion that “white is right” and to those bi-racials I say, claim both sides of your heritage and don’t say you… Read more »

Mixed Chick Who REALLY is Mixed
Mixed Chick Who REALLY is Mixed
9 years ago
Reply to  AC

I hear ya! I’m mixed and usually I don’t pay much attention to how I’m perceived by other people, but since starting a new job, I just noticed something from a black woman here at my job–makes me wonder if all of the other black women here at my job think the same way? I could tell she had a problem with me–Just noticed it today–I was using the women’s restroom located on her end of the building, as opposed to the one on my end–She says to me “Is your bathroom crowded or something?” …I told her “No, I… Read more »

hmm
hmm
9 years ago

maybe you’re reading too much into things … jeez

Mary
Mary
8 years ago
Reply to  hmm

I agree girl! At my last job I had never had so many problems with blak girls or noticed them caring so much about me! I feel like a freakin celebrity lol! And my mom as black! I am half white as well and except both very proudly! I will say I don’t even think about my race I’m just me! but anyway thus would bother me because your story is similar to mine there was a black girl on one of the teams next to mine at my job who would always comment when she over heard people asking… Read more »

Gee
Gee
9 years ago
Reply to  AC

“Generally, a person with light-brown skin is mixed. I’m sure Will Smith does have white ancestry somewhere down the line. So even though, society will consider Lenny Kravitz, or Bob Marley black, they aren’t. They are bi-racial and should be categorized as such. ” Not at all. Do Will Smith, Bob Marley and Lenny Kravitz have white in them? Yeah maybe but not all light-brown skinned people are mixed. Far from it. I’m light-brown skinned yet both my parents are FULLY African (0% white), lightness just runs in my father’s side of the family and in his tribe. Before you ask, both… Read more »

Mary
Mary
8 years ago
Reply to  AC

This is the best I have read on here! Omg I think you pinpointed it! My dad white and moms black! I am totally happy with who I am and love being mixed! But anyway yes what you said about a biracial identifying as both makes blacks feel oh so you think we’re low so you don’t want to say your only black is very true! I never saw it this way I thought they were just jealous of my hair and skin color since they say I think I’m better than them anyhow. Which is not true ugh… For… Read more »

Carol
9 years ago

I know this post is older and not recent but I had to comment I have 4 multiracial children and the looks and comments we get are enough to make you wanna scream but they are mine and I love them regardless of what people say or think this post is sooo true and I love that it was actually written I have heard many stereotypes about my children coming from places you wouldnt believe from the nurses at the hospital where I gave birth to the teachers at their schools its sad that in 2011 there is still so… Read more »

Honey-coated
Honey-coated
9 years ago

Oh My goodness peoples, BLACK GENES DOMINATE!!!!!!! STOP already. This is why the KKK has their own website. why don’t we all talk to them. I am Black first LOL and Cherokee Indian. But, I will say I’m sorry i would not want to B white. I do not need a “tan”. But, let’s talk to the real “HATERS” Okaaaaaaaay!

Hollu!

mids
mids
8 years ago
Reply to  Honey-coated

Your stupid, where in genetics study is that. “black” genes dominate?

TINA SMITH
TINA SMITH
9 years ago

i’m black i guess LOL. I had a grandpa that was blk and white, my grandma doesn’t know what she is. my other grandma was from guyana she said her dad was very fair ( probably white) my other grandfather didn’t know his father yet his mom had native american features. so my point is i’m black yes but i’m mixed with so many things. isn’t that why i’m so light??? is that why i tan easily to a medium brown. does that explain my features??? i can’t accept some one telling me how i should classify myself. actually i… Read more »

Weareallhuman
Weareallhuman
9 years ago

For the most part, points 1–5 are well taken. However, as a black woman with some mixed ancestry, I actually find the author’s views in #6 to be quite ignorant. It’s strange b/c the author’s first point (which I agree with) seems to contradict the last one… Sometimes people who identify as biracial feel like they have the right to define who is “really” mixed. Even the biracial label seems inaccurate to me, since either the “black” or “white” or “Asian” parent may well be of mixed ancestry themselves. I understand that the experience of growing up with one white and… Read more »

Soulsearchin
Soulsearchin
9 years ago

I agree with this whole entire article.… I would also like to add, that white folks just sit back and laugh at our STUPIDITY among ourselves. We got our own problems to deal with before we keep blaming everything on “the man”. The lasting affect that our slave masters embedded in us when it comes to light skin dark skin is still very much alive.… because of US.

mrashi
mrashi
8 years ago

The bottom line that we need to clearly see here, is do we put a race’s issue with self acceptance (black) or AA) before the well being of a child? We are so blinded in America by our struggle as a black culture, that we think if we let it go and just be, then catastrophe will fall. Eventually we will have to let it go. Until then, you have a child who adores each side of her parentage, and then they get a little older and have “Black America” telling that child he/she is black. How do you think… Read more »

Doreen
Doreen
8 years ago

My parents are from Jamaica and the Jamaican motto is’Out of many, one people’ and this is to reflect that Jamaican people are mixed with people from all over the world and that’s just the way we are are and Jamaicans are inherently proud of their mixed heritage and this has been proved with many people of Jamaican heritage who have had their DNA screened to find out for definite what their heritage is. And quite suprisingly the percentage of African DNA is not always necessarily the highest percentage of DNA found, yet the person concerned may have dark skin… Read more »

Amber
Amber
8 years ago
Reply to  Doreen

Hey! I agree with you! I’m Jamaican and I’m VERY MIXED. I’m Black Jamaican, Polish Jewish, Irish, French, Scottish, English, East Indian, and Chinese heritage. My family is mixed, and we call ourselves MIXED, not BLACK. I’m not African-American either, and I refuse to let people classify me the way they want to. I was raised in an Irish Italian community and they never called me “black” or “African American”. They let me categorize the way I wanted too.

Amber
Amber
8 years ago
Reply to  Amber

Yeah I grew up in an Italian neighborhood and let me tell you, Italians are VERY mixed.

Jesusinthecity
Jesusinthecity
8 years ago

I think I’m getting here a little late but I thought this was a great post! I think the poster did a wonderful job communicating her point of view and life experience. I am a black woman who has lots of mixed ancestry, but I consider myself black. People often ask me what my background is and I say, “I’m black but pretty much all of my grandparents are mixed.” If people want more of an explanation, I break it down for them, but really, it is only about a 60 second Parton the conversation and then we move on… Read more »

empress
empress
8 years ago

you have to learn to love it- most of us start out feeling like ugly ducklings. Then you have people who try to make you feel bad about liking who you are once you do learn to love yourself! My sisters and I are all very different because we have been exposed so many things because of our mixed family and I love it!
[img]https://bglh-marketplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/sisters.jpg[/img]

Ashley E
8 years ago

Im a biracial gal and I totally agree with everything she said. That has always been frustrating to me when Im asked “why do you have to say “mixed”, your black” in my situation I feel like it would be rude to not acknowledge my fathers heritage. I’ve even gotten the comment “Black is more dominant…so you’re black”.….that one my eyes almost popped out of my head. I identify with both sides equally and its as simple as that.

Lyn
Lyn
8 years ago

The author provides an interesting perspective although I question the accuracy of certain statements regarding African Americans. For many of us, mixed ancestry is not that far removed..maybe 3 or 4 generations but clearly the way that race is viewed in the U.S. is quite different from the British experience. I think that people should be able to self-identify but it’s also important to “respect” the historical context in which race assignment developed; particularly in the U.S. As an African American woman with light skin, hazel eyes and 3a hair ( for my curly hair folks) & 2 black parents..by… Read more »

nikki
nikki
8 years ago

I really enjoyed reading this article. I have recently learned more about my family’s history. Both of my grandparents on my mama’s side are biracial: my grandpa was black and white, my grandma was white and black indian. on my daddy’s side: my grandma is black with some indian and my grandpa was half black and half indian. With all of this information that i have been informed with, I have been wondering what does that classify me as. I’ve always thought I was only african american until recently. I have very light skin and long type 3b hair.All through… Read more »

:-)
:-)
8 years ago

Actually the term mixed indicates that a person has more then 1 race group in their heritage. Biracial means that you have either parents or grandparents that are of different races from each other.

Caramel
Caramel
8 years ago
Reply to  :-)

Isn’t this just semantics? Does it really matter? Mixed race means more than one race and biracial means 2 races, but so what? And?

Mimi
Mimi
8 years ago

A lot of great points and a great read, but I think the fact that the writer was mixed raced, she probably could not see the dynamic of number four. I have no problem with people claiming their mixed heritage, but what I find sad is people that try to fabricate such an identity. There is a large percentage of Blacks that will go out their way to try and make their peers believe that they are mixed, just because of their skin tone or hair texture. You don’t have to be mixed to have a looser curl pattern or… Read more »

Tracy
Tracy
8 years ago

My family is black dark skinned in the immediate family and then all lighter cousins and ancestry from the carribean. Both of my parents come from mixed race backgrounds and just happened to be the darkest of the kids. I know its weird but I look like a typical dark skinned African American girl with curly brown hair. When I was little the edges were blonde. Ironically white men and women see my mix more than blacks who are supposed to be yhe experts. I attract all non black men in droves.

sheylah monique
sheylah monique
8 years ago

hi i love this site…i have struggled all of my life being put down and treated like trash for being mixed. im black,native and irish. It seems that i have had to fight for being “light skinned”. i was rejected as a child alot by haters and that caused me to have serious self esteem issues, with forming friendships and relationships. your never black enough or white enough so i have alot of hispanic friends. people really dont understand how the cruelty really can effect our lives. i shouldnt have to only hang out with mixed people or hispanic people.… Read more »

Hillary
Hillary
7 years ago

When I saw your picture I immediately took you for a hispanic person that originates anywhere from Central to South America.You’re beautiful by the way.

Elyn
Elyn
8 years ago

Again, it’s culture and the way we’re socialized. African Americans didn’t make the rules of race, they we’re forcibly imposed upon us and not subscribing to such could mean death. Interracial couples couldn’t even marry in many states well into the ’60’s..and I’m talking about a white person trying to marry a person that maybe considered mixed because one parent was white and the other was black.. But according to American law not a whimsical passing by African Americans was indeed identified and ONLY recognized as black. As mentioned in an earlier post, call yourself what you want but when… Read more »

kobi
kobi
8 years ago

A lot of interesting comments on here.The bottom line is that we’re all humans,have similar likes and dislikes,emotions etc.I’m a 100% black african guy but medium brown. I sometimes wonder why people spend soo much time and energy on race issues.Love those who love you and ignore those who hate you.Life’s too short.Enjoy it and make the best of it instead of bothering about what people think about you.Do you live your lives for people or for yourself?I have a mixed race childhood friend with a Russian mother and African father.He sometimes used to get riled up when people refered… Read more »

Mira
Mira
8 years ago

A mixed race chick’s response to the biracial chick: This article could have been much shorter. The author could have just said, now dare you plain ol’black folk go around calling yourselves mixed. I’m more mixed than you! Here is what she doesn’t address. There are MGM people who are not biracial and who look WHITE because of years of endogamy. There are MGMs who look more biracial than many biracials. There are dark skinned MGMs with dead straight hair and white features or afro features, and there are light skinned biracials with very afro textured hair. At the end of… Read more »

Sarah
Sarah
8 years ago

You guys are forgetting that many people that are considered black don’t necessarily come from direct African descent. People from Honduras look just as black as most people. You have people from all over latin america like that. My mom is black and my dad is white. I don’t exactly know my origins, which i suspect to be the case of many. I think everybody is mixed in this country. Unless you come from a family that is inbred or you only associate with people from your origins, everybody is mixed. White people are just as mixed as black people are,… Read more »

Mary
Mary
8 years ago

I agree with you totally about how So many people think biracial people have had hard confused lives! I am biracial, my dads white and moms black. I never grew up confused or didn’t feel wanted by one of my races. I think it has everything to do with how your brought up in your home. I lived Ina loving caring family and we never had to even discuss race. A lot if the problem also is that some biracial kids parents or people their associated with MAKE them choose a side to identify with… This is very ignorant. I… Read more »

Ace
Ace
8 years ago

Well I have to say there is a HUGE difference from a Black American and an African. I believe that is why most Black Americans say they are all mixed. Cause technically we are.…like the Brazilians. That is why there are so many different hair textures in the black community. Cause we are all mixed up. LOL. But a “mixed” person that comes from parents with two different races, well yes they will look quite different from a Black American because they have less African in them. And they usually have the experience of two different cultures in their life.… Read more »

Rebecca
Rebecca
8 years ago

I am a mother of a two year old daughter who is “mixed, bi-racial.” My daughter is a human being and that is it! Color does not have to be an issue if we just all remember we are ALL humans.

Sophia
Sophia
7 years ago

I totally understand Sheylah Monique as I too receive a lot of outcast from the black community and I believe it’s really sad because at the end of the day we are all humans no matter our race or no matter what country we come from. Jealousy is certainly an ugly characteristic to have. I’m mixed race — both of my parents are mixed race ‑half black and half white and I’m proud of who I am and I don’t try to hide it as I believe it’s a blessing and its beautiful. We are all humans let us learn… Read more »

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