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Black Girl with Freckles = Black Girl

Avatar • Nov 16, 2010

This post is a response to When Natural Hair Tells a Different Story.


Kia Ling [Source]

by Charron “Ronnie” Andrus, Contributing Writer

I have freckles.

Everywhere.

They go hand in hand with my moles.

When I was born my hair was blonde and my eyes were green.

The hair is now a dark brown with red highlights.

Other black women often ask me what color I use to dye my hair refusing to accept it’s my natural color.

My eyes have darkened to a light brown.

And I’ve been asked often whether they are contacts.

Yet none of these physical characteristics have ever caused me to think of myself as anything other than a black woman.

Why would it?

I mean there are women in my family who could pass for white or Hispanic.

But they are still black.

We come in many different shades.

So the idea that freckles, or lighter skin, eyes and hair means that I am less black is ludicrous to me.

But there are many who assume that these things can not be “African” traits.

That there has to be something else to attribute these physical features.

It’s as if anything that is considered “mainstream” when it comes to beauty has to be anti black.

And sadly many black women buy into this lie.

They don’t realize their inherent beauty.

Feel as if they must give it away in order for it to be worth something.

The whole,

Oh I have red coloring because my family has Indian in it.”

Or

I have straight/curly/light hair because there is white in my family.”

There’s a distinct flaw in immediately attributing light skin, hair and eyes to a dilution of African blood. These traits can and do exist in purely African blood lines.

Blonde hair and blue eyes:
This coloring is common in people from North Africa especially Berbers. Milder forms of albinism can often present as blue eyes.

Red hair and freckles:
There are African tribes who have a predisposition to red hair and freckles as an expression of their albinism. This type of albinism can also cause a reddish tint to the skin. Hyper-pigmentation due to melanin production can also cause freckles.

These are just a few traits that are more commonly misinterpreted. Educating ourselves on the truth behind our physical differences is the first step in ending divisiveness.

When will we realize that our physical features are black traits and they are beautiful?

I don’t know the answer to that question.

But I think it’s overdue.

Charron “Ronnie” Andrus is a gerontologist and the founder of The Candy Shoppe, where she writes poetry, social commentary, music reviews and more. You can also follow her on Twitter @Ronnie6676

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Jc
Jc
10 years ago

Seriously, DNA tests do not cost that much. I urge anyone looking for real answers to invest in one. I said in the original article that hair and physical traits are not good indicators of whether you are of African ancestry or European ancestry or whatever. I disagree with the substance of both articles regarding attributing traits to genetics without actually doing the scientific test. I actually think that the topic of what defines you as being Black is totally different from whether or not your maternal and paternal lineage is African (i.e not everyone Black is African and not everyone… Read more »

Anon
Anon
10 years ago

Ugh, are we on this again? Why does it matter? Is this writer going to get applauded for not attributing her lightness to having white ancestry? A lot of American Blacks have white ancestry. Period. A lot of people who aren’t biracial by virtue of their parents don’t have to go back that far to see the racial diversity in their bloodlines. And no one is claiming to be better than you by mentioning that they have a non-black parent, grandparent, or great-grandparent. Why do people get so threatened by this concept? Okay, so some of you got your green… Read more »

Jenn C
10 years ago

ok soooo SHE is beyond GORGEOUS!!!! I always wished I had red hair & freckles…I think its sooo stinkin awesome..since I dont have those sweet traits..I rreeaally want my babies to have it & it really burns my muffins when ppl say “well I guess bess find u a reeeal fair white man” Now dont get mewrong- olives me sum mens…not matter their race, color, creed, I see beauty EVERYWHERE & I refuse to limit myself- but That is THEE dumbest to say…there ARE black folks with red hair & freckles & u just reinforced my arguement!!!! So I guess… Read more »

LNicole
LNicole
10 years ago

You and I could be sisters. I don’t know how to attach a photo to this comment but we favor so much it’s a bit frightening. As a child I struggled with loving my freckles because like most kids I wanted to fit in. I agree that my race and/or ethnicity are often questioned when I have never doubted my blackness or African ancestry. My brother had blue eyes until he was about 4 and now they are gray and his hair is quite red. We are some of the most diverse peoples in the world and we should celebrate… Read more »

Amanda
10 years ago

I know there was a recent post about not getting offended by opinion posts. I’m in no way offended by this post and I think it adds to the discourse on the identities of black women. I just think some of the language can be perceived as offensive territory. For instance, using words such as “pass for.” I just think it can insinuate that passing for white is a good thing. I’m not saying that’s what the author meant, though. Also, Hispanic signifies one who is a of spanish speaking origin. It’s not a race or culture and there’s no… Read more »

MzWoods
MzWoods
10 years ago

“Why do people get so threatened by this concept? Okay, so some of you got your green eyes from your African ancestors. Some of you have red hair from them too. And guess what, some of you didn’t.…” And that I believe should sum everything up in a nutshell. I think it is equally as intolerable to be possibly mixed and deny everything but the “black” part as it is to be non-mixed and claim “non-black” ancestry to make yourself feel better about life. The time has come where everyone really needs to get over this race debate and worry… Read more »

Amanda
10 years ago

Also, being black is a social construct. We identify or are identified as black e.g. the black experience in America. Yes, phenotype plays into this as well but the concept of race has no biological significance. The Khoi, Berbers and Arabs of Africa are African but they don’t necessarily identify as black. To be black in America is to have lived the black experience and/or be identified as black.

amona
amona
10 years ago

This post is no less inane than the original one. Still lots of conflation and confusion. And the implications of the bit about “not realizing our inherent beauty” and the “distinct flaw of not attributing certain traits to our African bloodline”…well, I’ll just that leave that alone.

Ronnie6676
10 years ago

I wrote this piece (as well as the one on my site) not as a kudos to myself or a tirade against anyone else. I just want to build up all of us regardless of coloring. And I want to bring attention to the fact that anything considered mainstream, including straight hair, light coloring, are often perpetuated as non African. This is a non truth and I wish women of color would stop falling for it. We are beautiful and there doesn’t have to be any * on the end of that.

P.S. the picture is of a model, it’s not me 🙂

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[…] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Ronnie, Ronnie and kurlybella, Black Girl Long Hair. Black Girl Long Hair said: Guest Post: Black Girl with Freckles = Black Girls http://bit.ly/aNswsy […]

freeyourheart
10 years ago

i think the first two commentors didn’t see (or missed) the big picture of what the author was trying to say. a lot of people when describing their features, often deemed as “exotic,” will add something extra besides african/black in their lineage. it goes back to this ideal of not wanting to be a “regular black girl.” (see this post by a belle in brooklyn: http://www.abelleinbrooklyn.com/home/2010/9/1/visual-aesthetics.html) yes. she has freckles. light eyes. reddish hair. but she’s just black. and that’s okay. she’s defining beauty for herself and showing a different side to black beauty. kudos for that. definitely gonna check… Read more »

Cat
Cat
10 years ago

@Anon, I agree with you so much! There are many different traits in Africa, but a vast majority of us African Americans are not 100% African (no matter what we look like). It’s absolutely ridiculous to say/believe so without any DNA testing. I understand the author is trying to take the other side of the argument and rather than claim white or Native American roots, claim African roots, and I appreciate what she’s trying to do. But she just falls into the same system of trying to say you have this much of this and this much of that in… Read more »

Kemi
10 years ago

I have to agree with this.. It strikes me as odd that our culture thinks that it is impossible for a 100% black person to be light skinned, light-eyed, non-3c/4a hair and red or brown hair. I’m 1st gen Nigerian-American, My family is 100% Nigerian and in my familty alone there are all shades of skin, hair and eye color.. from the fairest skin shade to the darkest and everything inbetween..and we are not diluted with anything..

Kemi
10 years ago

*“diluted”

Moni
Moni
10 years ago

Just because some Africans have red hair or freckles doesn’t change the fact that it is far more likely than not that any black person in America (or any other “Western” country) has those traits because of a mixed race history. Unless you know of your African ancestors (ie they voluntarily immigrated from Africa) most of our slave ancestors came from areas of Africa where those traits were not common, and certainly not common enough to have tons of light skinned, curly-haired descendants running around America and the Caribbean. Acknowledging that my skin color or other characteristics are partially due… Read more »

anonda
anonda
10 years ago

Wow some of yall are NEVER satisfied! Lol. I thought this was a good piece. It was far more informed than the other one. Yes, no one knows for sure without a DNA test, but the bottom line is not to pigeon-hole “african” features in my opinion. I’ve been to Africa and even in a place like Ghana there are so many different groups of people with different features regardless of shade. Whether the author has white lineage or is “purely” African, she is our sister. We are are women of the African Diaspora. I’m content when we can at least… Read more »

Monisola
Monisola
10 years ago

I love my people. I love African People. I love looking African. I love my African Features. And I am tired of them being put down by the mainstream! BUT! I am not completely African. NO ONE who has had family in this great melting pot for more than a century can claim to be 100% ANYTHING. Not even white people!!! SOOO many white people are part native american too, some even part black way way back! What I mean to say is…I want our blackness our Africaness to be celebrated. But part of the reality of black people of… Read more »

mixed beans
mixed beans
10 years ago

@Anon, i could not agree with you more!! i am really annoyed at all this: “i am 100% African”, even when the person looks whiter than white and as it turns out both their maternal and paternal grand-parents are white! lol :). I am also annoyed when people ask me about my heritage and i mention that i am multiracial (my grand father is Italian and my grandmother is half French half West African), they flinch and give me the whole “self-hatred” spiel, why bloody ask me in the first place if you are not prepared to hear the answer? why… Read more »

chocolate
chocolate
10 years ago

It was good piece and I understand where the writer is coming from. On general note though, I just wana say that we have to be careful that in our attempt to identify who we are that we do not neglect other aspects of our racial ancestry. Sure you can find 100% Africans with features like the writer, but does that mean that every black person who has green eyes, freckles and brown hair is black and nothing else? Not really. I have to agree with Anon. It seems as if when a black person identifies with any other race,… Read more »

Moira
10 years ago

To me discussion about race is too complex and we shouldn’t always go by the way u look and the nature has proved me that many times. Example there is one football(soccer) player in UK Ryan Giggs when u look at him u would assume he’s ur typical white man but in reality his paternal grandfather is black (from sierra Leone) and he proudly claims his blackness (which makes me happy to finally see a white looking person claim their blackness) and has an African last name lol. Many of us have diluted ethnicity(especially African Americans and Afro-Caribbeans) but to… Read more »

Jojo
Jojo
10 years ago

THANK YOU! (That is all)
Go, beautiful!

Gabby=]
Gabby=]
10 years ago

Some peoples opiinions you just cant change so I just keep it pushing I supposedly (I dont see it lol) have greyish/light brown eyes and my hair is.….curly mostly, but its also kinky My hair turns red like RED and light brown during the summer I love all the features I have But recently while I’ve been transistion friends have said “O your hair is curly, your pretty, keep on wearing it that way” What was I before??? And just today this girl was thinking about growing her hair out and her friend said don’t do that and I said why not, she said… Read more »

Anon
Anon
10 years ago

This model can claim to be anything she chooses but it is obvious that somewhere there is caucasian blood in her lineage. I get annoyed when I hear black people say that their straight hair, light skin or blue eyes can be an African trait. NOT!! These are not African traits! I don’t see them as being anymore beautiful than true African traits such as dark skin, kinky hair, full lips.…. Why can’t we embrace true African features? People say ridiculous things like, “black people come in all shades, hair textures and so on” Umm, if they are on the… Read more »

Peace
Peace
10 years ago

@anon- most black people have some trace of white in their blood thanks to the historical event of slavery. And since most african americans are descendants of slaves, most will have “white features”. That doesnt mean their not black. There a light skin people with full lips, kinky hair, and dark eyes. And brown and dark people with curly hair, light eyes, and light hair. Which is more “black”? Please inform me. There is diversity within the Black race. My friend straight from nigeria has light skin and brown hair. Is she not african? Theres many different people, and no… Read more »

Egyptianbella
Egyptianbella
10 years ago

WHY WOULD WE THANK OUR WHITE ANCESTRY FOR ANYTHING? THEY RAPED US AND ABUSED US IN THE PAST, SO WHY SHOULD WE BE HAPPY TO HAVE WHITE BLOOD FLOWING THROUGH US? IM AM NOT HAPPY AND I DONT CLAIM HAVING WHITE BLOOD IN ME AT ALL. WHITES DONT CLAIM HAVING BLACK BLOOD IN THEM, SO WHY SHOULD WE? LETS JUST CLAIM OUR BEAUTY FROM AFRICA AND BE PROUD OF THAT. TRUTHFULLY, WE WILL ALWAYS BE BLACK TO WHITE PEOPLE AND WE SHOULD LOVE THAT. BLACK GIRLS ROCK!

Egyptianbella
Egyptianbella
10 years ago

WHAT IS AN AFRICAN TRAIT? DO AFRICANS HAVE LONG HAIR? YES! DO AFRICANS HAVE LIGHT EYES? YES! DO AFRICANS HAVE SOFT CURLY HAIR? YES! DO AFRICANS HAVE KINKY HAIR? YES! DO AFRICANS HAVE LIGHT SKIN (WITHOUT BEING MIXED)? YES! DO AFRICANS HAVE DARK SKIN? YES! SO WHAT THE HELL! AFRICANS HAVE HAD DIFFERENT TRAITS FOR CENTURIES. I HAVE A LONG NOSE AND PEOPLE ALWAYS TELL ME I LOOK LIKE IM MIXED WITH A DIFFERENT RACE BECAUSE OF MY NOSE. THATS IGNORANT! AFRICANS HAVE LONG NOSES, WIDE NOSES, SLANTED EYES, ALMOND SHAPED EYES, ETC… AFRICANS WERE ON EARTH FIRST SO EVERY… Read more »

Egyptianbella
Egyptianbella
10 years ago

DAMN, FULL BLOODED AFRICANS DO HAVE CURLY SOFT HAIR! THEY ALSO CAN HAVE LIGHT BROWN EYES. THEY DO NOT HAVE BLUE EYES BUT THEIR EYES CAN BE LIGHT WITHOUT BEING MIXED WITH SOMETHING.

Egyptianbella
Egyptianbella
10 years ago

WHITE PEOPLE NEVER WANT TO CLAIM BEING MIXED WITH BLACK. SO WHY DO WE ALWAYS WANT TO CLAIM THEM?

Egyptianbella
Egyptianbella
10 years ago

AND BY THE WAY, I HATE FRECKLES? I DONT LIKE THEM ON ANY RACE. I ESPECIALLY DONT LIKE RED HAIR AND FRECKLES ON WHITE PEOPLE. IT LOOKS BAD ON ANYONE SO STOP ACTING LIKE ITS A BEAUTIFUL TRAIT CAUSE ITS NOT. WHITE PEOPLE CAN HAVE THAT UGLY TRAIT.

Anon
Anon
10 years ago

@Egyptianbella- Girl u got some issues! That kind of hate will eat you up. Let it go. It aint that serious.

rosie
rosie
10 years ago

I didn’t mind the original — original post, it’s just that these topics just do go over well. You only have to look at the most commented threads which debtate blackness, browness, africaness, lightness, etc. I mean if you’re consistently reading or posting on a website titled “black girl long hair” you can assume that you and 98% of the remaining readership is black *enough* to still have some type of black hair. For a website that I read primarily for inspiration about hair, hairstyles and hair products, that’s good enough for me. Everything else is beside the point.

mek
mek
10 years ago

OK, i am a population geneticist, and I was gonna keep quiet about this issue that developed in the last post but now I am gonna open my mouth quickly and then shut up. RACE IS A SOCIAL CONSTRUCT. THERE IS NO BIOLOGICAL CONCEPT OF RACE. HUMAN PHENOTYPES ARE CLINES DEPENDENT NOT ONLY ON GENETICS (NEUTRAL AND SELECTED GENETIC VARIANTS ALIKE) BUT ENVIRONMENT. HENCE PEOPLE NEAR THE EQUATOR ARE DARKER NO MATTER IF YOU’RE IN AFRICA OR ASIA BECAUSE DARKER SKIN IS GONNA KEEP YOU ALIVE, AND LIGHTER IN THE NORTH. YOU THEN HAVE INTERMEDIATE PHENOTYPES IN THE MIDDLE DUE TO NOT… Read more »

anne grey
anne grey
10 years ago

Like others have noted, race is a social construct. Africans, like the author noted, come in a variety of hues, eyecolors, haircolors and hair textures. The origin of humanity comes from Africa. As the world evolved, people evolved to suit their environments. Ok, I am clearly not a scientist; but what I gather is that there is a simplified notion of race yet genetics is so complex that the notion of “blackness” is just not sufficient.

M.J.
M.J.
10 years ago

Preach, Mek!
I was thinking the exact same thing.

mixed beans
mixed beans
10 years ago

@ Mek: THANK YOU! and Amen! i am so thankful you brought up that North African debate! I just want to add that, not all “mixed” people (by that i mean, mixed with some white) have the “raped black slave” history, so some people just need to get over that. I am not American, my people didn’t suffer from the slave trade, no-one got raped by “the bad white master”, i am mixed because in my family, people just fell in love with a person and it started from there. So there is no “self-hatred” when i say i love… Read more »

Anon
Anon
10 years ago

Thanks @mek…I’d read about Arabs migrating into East Africa as well, so all of this talk that blacks in Africa are 100% pure and proof that these phenotypes are normal variation just isn’t true. (I know that frequently on this blog, people want to point to Ethiopians and Somalians as proof that someone can be “100% African” but still have wavy or curly hair.) Also, everyone should be aware that Europeans first made inroads into Africa centuries and centuries ago (ancient Greeks and Romans for example), so again, not sure why so many Africans want to chime in to claim pure… Read more »

Jade
Jade
10 years ago

Mek, MANY of the things you posted were very inaccurate. Human skin color diversity is highest in sub-Saharan African populations. Relethford JH. Department of Anthropology, State University of New York College at Oneonta, 13820, USA. Abstract Previous studies of genetic and craniometric traits have found higher levels of within-population diversity in sub-Saharan Africa compared to other geographic regions. This study examines regional differences in within-population diversity of human skin color. Published data on skin reflectance were collected for 98 male samples from eight geographic regions: sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, Europe, West Asia, Southwest Asia, South Asia, Australasia, and the New… Read more »

Rachel
Rachel
10 years ago

Thank you to the guest blogger for proving that beautiful is black in all shades, hair types, and hair colors. The natural hair movement is about embracing your natural self. All of yourself, no matter what.

Amanda
10 years ago

@Mek–That’s exactly what I tried to explain in my previous comment. Race is a social construct! Blackness doesn’t necessarily translate into “Africaness” or being African. Also, if you REALLY want to get technical, then we can say ALL people are essentially African since it Africa has been proven to be the cradle of civilization. Black is an idea that was created to make WHITE or the “WHITE race” which also is a social construct the standard, the superior, the quintessential race. 100 years ago, Jews and the Irishpeople were not considered white. 200 years ago, any man who didn’t own… Read more »

Anon
Anon
10 years ago

@Mek- Thanks for enlightening some folks!

Michelle
Michelle
10 years ago

I think she looks beautiful no matter what her background is. Why do we have to analyze the way each other looks? Why can’t beautiful just be beautiful? Why do we have to say things like “pretty dark-skinned” girl? I just think that if someone is pretty they just are, no matter what their features are(light or dark skin, skinny or wide nose, kinky or curly hair..etc…just fall into place to create a beautiful look.

Black Married Momma
10 years ago

Mek (and anyone else who is interested), Racial admixture tests ARE available, not just the maternal/paternal ones via African Ancestry and other companies. AncestryByDNA offers racial admixture tests. I have done them all. I am 79 percent Sub-Saharan African, 15 percent European, 5 percent Native American and 1 percent East Asian. My paternal African bloodline shares genetic commonalities most found in the Yoruba of Nigeria and my maternal line with the Temne of Sierra Leone, the Kru of Liberia and the Tikar of Cameroon. If you can part with about $800, you, too, can find out all of this about… Read more »

Black Married Momma
10 years ago

BTW,

Just to reiterate how looks can be deceiving and may not always indicate high levels of admixture, my husband is chocolatey brown with coily hair in locks. He is damn near 30 percent European, with no other non-African (i.e. Asian or Native American) admixture.

One of our daughters is lighter (caramellish) like me with type 4A hair. The other one is darker (think sienna) with type 3Bish hair.

Jc
Jc
10 years ago

Jade I agree, Mek you have serious inaccuracies in your statement , I am not a genetist but I am a scientist and there is a big difference between fact and opinion. You have meshed the two in your comment. Fact: African Americans can range between 99% and 1% West African (99% being the upper mark). It is indeed possible to be AA and ‘100% African’, there is no evidence that everyone AA is actually part European and part African as you say. Examples: Study on 365 AAs and 225 Africans. Second Study on 121 Africans. There are so many… Read more »

Lady Jaye
Lady Jaye
10 years ago

Just because race is a social construct does not mean it is not important! We navigate our lives more in the social spheres than we do in scientific or spiritual or whatever realms you want.
Yes, race is not genetic, WE GET IT! It’s still important.

anonda
anonda
10 years ago

Thank you Jade and JC- wow Mek you were on track to a great post (and yes race is a social construct) but got a little sidetracked on the science. Note where it says very clearly “ALL of the allelels common in non-African populations are ALSO common in African populations.”

http://www.understandingrace.org/humvar/race_humvar.html

mek
mek
10 years ago

whoa whoa whoa save for the part about DNA testing i don’t think i was mixing my opinion with fact at all, some of my wording was unclear now that i look back at my statement so maybe it came off as opinion so sorry about that. i am aware of all the “facts” that you guys bring up (and really, a lot of these papers are still hypotheses because we don’t have enough sequence data nor the right type of sequence data) and it IS my opinion that my statements are in concordance with those facts from the papers… Read more »

mek
mek
10 years ago

@anonda: sorry for being so sciency (i can’t help it, i swear!) i’ll stop on this one, but before i do i have to say this: i am pretty sure that statement (“ALL of the allelels common in non-African populations are ALSO common in African populations.”) is not true, given that populations continued to evolve after they left africa it is only logical that novel mutations arose that eventually became common and aren’t in africa because they arose later. and we are still developing our concept of common and rare variants, especially for africa.

anonda
anonda
10 years ago

Hi Mek!
No need to apologize for being sciency because I’m a scientist too (though not a geneticist). I know a few of the researchers on the understanding race project as well. Excellent researchers ALL (and many cross-disciplinary). I’m going to ride with them for now on the allele issue, but hey I respect that science is ever evolving and the “truth” is not so black and white. As you mentioned in your post, data gathering and analysis continues. Thanks for clarifying in your second post, and I wish you continued success in your scientific career! That’s an exciting field!

OJ
OJ
10 years ago

I’ve only got a Bsc but I agree with Mek.

Anon
Anon
10 years ago

I agree with whomever said that blacks who say Africans can have light skin and loose curly hair are just trying to associate “good” qualities to Africans. I am sorry but blue eyes, blond hair and white skin are not African traits. That’s like a Swede saying their kinky hair and caramel skin is a European trait. Heck, I am happy to say that my long thick, very kinky hair, full lips/hips and caramel skin are all beautiful AFRICAN traits. On the other hand, my daughter has green eyes, reddish blond wavy hair and those are her dad’s beautiful Irish… Read more »

Kemi
10 years ago

@anon Personally, I am not trying to associate any “good” traits with Africans. Similar to folks that get questioned about their race when they identify as black but do not have traditionally African features, when the subject of nationality comes up and I say that I am 1st generation african (Nigerian), the first thing most people say is well you don’t “look” african..mind you I’m dark skinned, dark eyes..etc..My little sister gets questioned more because she has long (relaxed) brown hair, brown eyes and she is fair skinned because it is just IMPOSSIBLE for a West African person to NOT… Read more »

Jc
Jc
10 years ago

Mek, thanks for your second post clarifying your position. I think a scientific debate has to be about facts and I appreciate that you took the time to restate your views. For example a ‘100% African’ AA resulting from admixture — I like that you said probably not definitively. I am on the total opposite side of the fence on this. I agree with you on scientists making an assumption on the basis of the ‘representative majority’. Without assumptions, there would be no science. However, here is the flaw. Tishkoff’s paper does state the need for more work on ancestry given… Read more »

Jc
Jc
10 years ago

Kemi I agree, Anon has clearly never been in sub saharan Africa. I have seen it all too blonde hair, straight hair and blue eyes (never seen green but i have seen blue). While it is rare, it is not unheard of. Many Africans piped up and said this both in this post and the previous. I guess it is just so inconceivable that a ‘real African’ is anything other than the quintessential so we must all be blind. I can see an argument coming on about facial structure next lol. My sister and her ‘un African’ pointy nose is in… Read more »

Anon
Anon
10 years ago

@Jc — I have spent a lot of time in Afica. I have seen all that you describe. I also have sense enough to know there is admixture involved when I see a blond African with straight hair and blue eyes! Sheesh!

Jc
Jc
10 years ago

Anon your response is utterly ridiculous but I am passionate about my continent so I will entertain you. I am talking about people who can trace family back to 6–10 generations. Well before European colonization and well before Arabic trade. The traits you see are highly unlikely to result from admixture involving the typical blonde genus i.e European. A more reasonable explanation could be phenotypes of albinism. However as many of these individuals are atypical in there presentation of albinism (i.e blue eyes with dark skin, blonde hair with dark skin, straight hair with dark skin), it would actually be… Read more »

classychassis
classychassis
9 years ago

I am so light. And my hair is as kinky as it wants to be. Its nice to see women who are like myself. My ‘blackness’ is always in question, by all races. (im even lighter complected than you) But i know who and what i am. And proud of it:)

Catherine
Catherine
9 years ago

I’m Haitian and everyone assumes I’m just black.

This comes down to the “You don’t look Haitian” thing.
There are very light skinned Haitians that are nearly white and people call them that. But no, they’re Haitian.

Skin-color has nothing to do with your heritage. If people don’t want to understand it then let them stay ignorant and ignore them.

K.
K.
9 years ago

Some people just don’t know any better. But those of us who do know, let’s educate.

Shauni
Shauni
9 years ago

I don’t think that you should deny you other racial heritages that make you who you are and most of us in the western hemisphere are multiethnic as our history would show if we were to go back a couple generations of our family history. To say that you attribute the way you look to albinism which is a recessive gene by the way and isn’t at all dominant so it’s occurence is rare within the population, and denying your other ethnic qualities is being a bit dishonest. Most of us are descendants of west Africans and while there are… Read more »

CurlyJoy
8 years ago
Reply to  Shauni

I couldn’t have said it better. I should’ve read this before commenting lol. This is such a big problem for many people. Especially some of the older generation, for which I can understand. Though, for us as the younger generation, we cannot progress as people of the world by not embracing all that we are. The past is sad as it is beautiful, but we would not exist had it not happened. Acceptance does take time, but it won’t happen if people choose denial for a semblance of unity.

borninafrica
borninafrica
5 years ago
Reply to  CurlyJoy

Yeah but well I can get her denial. Like how can you peacefully accept that you you have both the slave’s and massa’s blood, especially when it’s so visible. It’s unbearable. As a fully African woman, I’m happy I don’t have to deal with that

Jen
Jen
9 years ago

I can understand and sympathize her comments. I have a dark complexion but I have light brown eyes and soft curly hair. People cant fathom that someone so dark can have those features, but thats how the rest of my family looks. People usually assume I have my hair texturized or Im wearing contacts. The older I get the more I realize how BLACK people lack the ability to associate “good” features with being of African decent.

tye
tye
9 years ago
Reply to  Jen

my family is creole so i have a little cuzn dark skinned so beautiful right have those same features but not the eyes… i think a lot a black people are small minded but not all of them are

tye
tye
9 years ago

ok my momma has a red undertone so she’s caramel cuz she’s a sun bather type she has freckles on her cheeks along with moles my best friend mother is black with blonde hair and piercing blue eyes = BUT OUR FAMILY IS FRENCH CREOLE SO…

my momma is relaxed but her natural hair she claims is 4 type hair and i in the other case am 3b/3c just family traits

Kaylisa Estes
Kaylisa Estes
9 years ago

I always loved black people with freckles, and dimples also. My aunt has big freckles and deep dimples and always made me want some, just because of her big smile!

CurlyJoy
8 years ago

This is a great post. Though, I acknowledge my family’s history of diverse ethnicities that make up the current me. I’m two-toned, the darkest part of my body is my face. I change colors in the summer and winter as well. I happen to have freckles too, but due to my already mentioned attribute, it isn’t noticeable unless you’re looking very closely. I have curly hair as well, which is my whole family’s noticeable trait other than skin tone. I never grew up thinking my differences from my counterparts were better or worse. We’ll I did think they were worse… Read more »

Syndie
Syndie
8 years ago

Hey, this is very interesting! I could relate in some way. I am Haitian, Spanish(Dominician/Panamian/Cuban), Arab(Syrian/Egyptian),and Indian. I’m telling you, I have dark brown skin so right from the bat you would think I’m straight up African American kind of but I also have this exotic look. I have a nice chocolate shade to my skin. If you see some of my relatives they come in all shades. I consider myself to be very beautiful inside and out. I have nice hair, freckles, and you could only tell the Arab/Indian side because of my eyes there like big, beautiful almond… Read more »

Anon
Anon
8 years ago

I believe people from the Carribean have the best attitude.They know,acknowledge and are proud of their mixed heritage.They know they are a mixed heritage people and don’t have an issue with it.It is interesting especially in the immediate family where even with the same parents, the way the genes have expressed themselves i.e skin colour, nose and eye shape are all different. Its time, certain people grew up and stopped obsessing so much. At the end of the day,it really doesn’t matter in the scheme of things.

Chi-Chi
Chi-Chi
7 years ago
Reply to  Anon

My mother has green eyes. The green eyes skip a generation so my kids would get them. My father has straight hair, I don’t know how it would be typed but it sure isn’t type 4. I have light brown eyes, my brother’s are caramel. We are all really light skinned… and no, we don’t have any mix in us. I am full Nigerian. The light skin and light eyes go way back in my family. Living in the U.K, I found it really irritating that people felt I had to have some white in me to justify the way… Read more »

V-Yella Westcoast
V-Yella Westcoast
4 years ago
Reply to  Chi-Chi

Light skin africans are mixed too they just don’t know. Light skin, light colored eyes, wavy hair, curly hair freckles all of that comes from white people. The european people had relations with Africans thats how the whole light skin thing came about.

V-Yella Westcoast
V-Yella Westcoast
4 years ago
Reply to  Chi-Chi

Light skinned africans are mixed they just don’ know. Light skin, light colored eyes, wavy hair curly hair freckles, all of that is from white people not Africans.The European men had sexual relations with African women and that’s how the whole light skin thing came about.

Lisa Adams
Lisa Adams
7 years ago

Did you always have the freckles or did they come later like mine? So, my mother is light skin born with blonde hair (now darker) and blue eyes and still blue. I am dark brown (though other say I’m not dark) but I am. Medium brown eyes and brown hair. The freckles came as I got older. They are only on my cheeks. Why do I have the freckles now?
I’m 49.

Dee
Dee
7 years ago

I have a paternal uncle and paternal aunt who both have freckles. My uncle was a light brown with brownish red freckles and red hair. My aunt is high tone with medium brown freckles and black hair. My uncle’s opposite look to my father who was light complexion with black wavy hair made me feel uncomfortble when he would visit when I was very young. I don’t know why. There were too many different looking people on my paternal side. So from a young age I never liked red hair and freckles. Now that I am older, I wish one… Read more »

Cosita
Cosita
5 years ago

I have freckles and so does everyone else in my family. Somehead to toe. I never thought of it as a non black trait. Also myself and many of my relativeshave naturally reddish brown hair

Léanne
Léanne
5 years ago

Hi , my name is Léanne, i’m from France and i’m ”dark skin”. I’m Congolese and I was born in France. I’ve got freckles , my mother got it, my grand father and maybe my ancenstor too. And I don’t think we got a mixed ancestor. I think some people got it and so people dosen’t got it. ( sorry for my english )

khiugi
khiugi
5 years ago

i have freckles and i’m not mixed with anything. my mom has it too and she passed it on to me

Leah
Leah
5 years ago

I’m a dark skin black woman with natural light brown hair. I got asked many times if I dyed my hair and what dye did I use .

christinanolanXD
christinanolanXD
4 years ago

ah

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