Skip to main content

Mom grows out daughter’s kinky natural hair to waist length

Avatar • Jan 10, 2010

By Ayoka of Nappy Sexy Fly

bday
My daughter has a whole lot of nappy hair as you can see. Her hair is below waist length stretched. She is 5 years old and of course has never had her hair straightened. She knows she’s beautiful because we always tell her that she is sooooooo beautiful. She knows nothing of self loathing. She loves her skin and hair and everything about herself because we adore her and tell her so all the time. We live in a predominantly white community so she interacts with them on the regular but has no issues. She attracts love and kindness like a magnet because this is what she experiences all the time in her home. This is her foundation. It’s all in how you treat your children. It’s all in the messages you send them. A child should not feel insecure, ugly or unwanted. Our job as parents is to make sure they know they are perfect and precious. Their lives even when we are not around will reflect the love we planted in their souls.

As for her hair, there is no way on earth her hair would ever be as healthy or achieve this length with a relaxer. I have older twin daughter’s who’s hair was as long as this. Their father begged me for years to relax it because he couldn’t do it on their visits so I gave in eventually and let him take them to have it done. I knew what would happen but he didn’t believe me when I told him. Their hair was super long and healthy to start then it began to break off. It eventually broke off to chin length in a year’s time even though they had their hair done professionally and kept it up. Needless to say, they are both transitioning now and never want to see another relaxer as long as they live. Now when I send them to their father for visits, their hair is in braids. They know how healthy their hair was prior to the relaxer and how badly it damaged their hair. Relaxers hold no mystique for them. They will not be begging me to perm it for prom. Nappy hair is fragile not strong and chemicals break it down to the point that it is even more fragile and prone to breakage.

My youngest daughter is by my husband. We both agreed no chemical would ever touch her hair. Her hair got this long by treating it the way nappy hair needs to be treated. Very little manipulation. I put her braids in and don’t take them down for weeks at a time. I wash her hair in the braids. When its time to redo, I take it one braid at a time making sure to moisturize and oil to prevent breakage. I separate and smooth with my fingers and very gently comb the ends with a wide tooth comb and re-braid. She usually has anywhere from 8 to 12 braids. It takes about 2 hours to do her hair because I don’t yank and snatch through it like it needs to be punished. The keys to healthy naps are moisture, low manipulation and a gentle patient touch. That’s pretty much it. Her hair is also never blow dried, in fact no heat is used on her hair.

For all those who use hair typing, we are both 4b in other words nappy. Her father is a pure blooded Ghanaian (Ghana, West Africa, blackest Africa, home of the purest naps and deepest melanin endowed gorgeous dark skin where the majority of us can trace our roots because it is from there that the majority of our ancestors departed) 🙂 I am an African-American with no recent interruption of my African bloodline, in other words not mixed. Yes, true African naps can achieve length if so desired if you honor God’s blessing by nurturing and loving them and caring enough to learn about how to take care of them instead of trying to murder them with toxic chemicals.

As long as I am in charge, my daughter will never feel the burn of chemicals or the heat of a straightening tool. She will always know and not question the power and truth of her own God given beauty just as she knows it at the impressionable age of 5.

Naturally I was amazed by this story, so I asked Ayoka to share her daughter’s regimen. She sent this in her reply e‑mail

People can mistake a well managed head of 4b hair for 3 type hair. I get that a lot and I educate people so they aren’t mistaken and know that their hair can do all the stuff my daughter’s and my hair does. I think when people understand all the options they have with their hair and that it’s really not that difficult to manage, then we will see more of us letting go of the relaxers because relaxed hair isn’t nearly as versatile, healthy and in my opinion, beautiful on us as our own hair texture.”

AYOKA’S DAUGHTER’S REGIMEN

1. Very low manipulation. This is the most important thing I must emphasize for type 4 hair. 4b hair is the most fragile and if you’re breaking it off while you’re trying to grow it, you’ll never see length. I’m able to avoid a lot of manipulation because I keep it stretched never letting it bunch up, tangle up or shrink.

2. Keep it stretched. This is especially important for me because she has a lot of hair and I can’t afford the situations that will surely jump off, if I allow all that hair to shrink and wrap around each other. The detangle would be enormous. The way I keep her hair in a stretched state is by keeping it moisturized, oiled and in box braids, this way it is never really tangled to the point where I have to go at it like a mad woman. I am able to detangle her hair for the most part using my fingers. I use a wide tooth comb to help and a soft brush down the length of it to smooth it out when I style it. The most important thing is to never snatch though it. Be gentle and work your way from the bottom when detangling.

3. I never wash it all loose. That would be an epic undertaking. I always keep her hair separated. I take her braids down one at a time (I do this in our bath tub) wash, condition, rinse and sloppily twist or braid that section and continue on to the next until I’m done and ready to style. I mostly co-wash and ACV rinse prior to co-washing when it’s really dirty. When washing I do not ever scrub the hair against it self like you see in commercials this will create tangle and knots. I wet the section thoroughly and pull the conditioner gently down her hair shaft and rinse downward, loosening and separating any tangles as I go using a wide tooth comb from the ends upward if necessary.

4. Moisture is key for type 4 hair because as we all know it’s drier than a dessert. My daughters hair likes heavy products. So any thick leave-in or moisturizer is where I start on her damp washed hair. I coat each section with a leave in or moisturizer (not picky just has to be thick) and then seal with olive oil and shea always gently pulling the product down the hair shaft. This is heavy but for her dry hair it smooths it out and helps it to stretch to the max without heat. I spray her scalp and braids with pure Aloe Vera juice mixed with olive oil. I redo her hair no more than every two weeks. If she’s rocking 8 or more braids that can be styled different ways, I’ll leave it up for up to a month, cleaning her scalp with a wet rag and cleaning her braids from top to bottom with a wet rag, sometimes I’ll wash her hair while in the braids if it gets to dirty. Yes it gets fuzzy when I do this but sometimes I’m lazy and sometimes she doesn’t feel like getting it done lol. If she’s got her 5 braid situation going on, I will of course take her hair wraps off each braid and tie her hair up at night and use some product to brush and smooth it in the morning and put her hair bands (non-elastic and using very little tension). She looks fresh like that for 2 weeks.

***
For more of Ayoka, check out her blog HERE.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
178 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Kay
Kay
10 years ago

This is the perfect response to Ms Union’s blog. Absolutely gorgeous.

*It is your duty as a black woman to smile at and compliment every little black girl you pass in the street.*

Michelle
Michelle
10 years ago

ok, her with priness tiana is the most adorable picture EVER!! that is the cutest thing i have seen in a while. what a lucky little girl to have such a great set of parents with their stuff really together.

afrofeelin
afrofeelin
10 years ago

OH my god !!! The daughter and the mother have beautiful hair. I wish I could have hair like this ^.^

afrofeelin
afrofeelin
10 years ago

Oh my god!! the daughter and the mother have beautiful hair !! I wish I could have hair like this ^.^

bee
bee
10 years ago

wow, great article. however, one statement in here rubbed me the wrong way, “Ghana, West Africa, blackest Africa, home of the purest naps and deepest melanin endowed gorgeous dark skin”, so if you’re not from west africa, you’re not authentically black??

Jane Ug-Lbc
10 years ago

She’s beautiful!!!!!

tryinottotexlax
tryinottotexlax
10 years ago

This is probably the most heart-warming and inspiring story I’ve read on BGLH. Gorgeous AND smart? Yes please!

vonnie
10 years ago

wow, her hair is so beautiful and that sounds like such a great regime to adapt. I need to get on something like that, I like to play in my curls too much 🙁 That is a problem that i know creates tangles, but it’s so soft and fun. I’ll be sure to adapt something like she does, twist or braid it up and let it thrive. Great post, thanks for finding and sharing her story! The mom sounds like a great parent, teaching her gorgeous daughter great self worth and esteem. BRAVO!!

http://socialitedreams.wordpress.com

trackback

[…]  Any suggestions?  I’ve just come across a great post on http://bglhonline.com/ about how a mother grew her type 4 child’s hair down to her waist, simple regime and emphasis on LOW MAINTENANCE, so I’ll have to adapt that by learning how to […]

revolution grl
10 years ago

what a beautiful, beautiful little girl and mom too! this post made me smile so much 🙂

dajewel
dajewel
10 years ago

this is a great article!!! am loving the frankness in the article!! my hair is a 4, and i have had people mistake it for 3 because i keep it so moisturized, etc. i also have to co-sign with her with washing the hair in twists: it makes a world of a difference. i pretty much co-wash/shampoo and dc when my hair is in twists, gently untwist, detangle with my fingers (i haven’t used a come since the middle of last year) and retwist.

Yoshi3329
Yoshi3329
10 years ago

That great, though, I didn’t have to see princess tiana, can’t stand that movie.

Yardyspice
Yardyspice
10 years ago

Her hair is so beautiful! Kudos to you mom.

mellowyel
mellowyel
10 years ago

aww, she’s gorgeous! and WOW WOW WOW such beautiful hair! i think she one-upped Princess Tiana in that last pic, lol. inspiring

Monique
10 years ago

Props to Ayoka for knowing how to properly handle natural hair. Her daughter’s hair is beautiful. KUDOS for teaching her to love herself as she is!!!

I hope we see more of this in the black community as knowledge AND acceptance of natural hair spreads.

MissyD
MissyD
10 years ago

This little girl is so adorable!!! She is too precious. But I really like this article. Recently a friend of mine just realized that I’m natural (when we first met I had a weave on and then he went overseas for a few months). He asked me all sorts of offensive questions like do I shave, do I bathe in juices? Then he remarked about Angelina Jolie’s daughter and her “nappy” hair as if it were a plague. So I’m going to send him this article to read and hope that he reads the more of the blog. I can’t… Read more »

Nikki
10 years ago

GO MOM!!!!! Her daughter is beautiful!!! Mama is beautiful too! Beautiful hair. 😀

Joli
Joli
10 years ago

hmmmm I don’t know about this statement. Although I love her commitment to natural hair and her daughter’s love, it seems like another person with 4type hair who likes to dismiss 3type hair. Look, I know there are always comments about different types of hair, but come on… when she was talking about how she is “pure African” it made it almost sound like having different cultures was “unpure”. Oh well, I don’t feel like causing any negative energy, but I wish one day all types of kinky textures can accept each other without having to make speeches about how… Read more »

Ms. Wright
10 years ago

Her hair is gorgeous and I’m glad she’s teaching her daughter to love herself. However, “Our job as parents is to make sure they know they are perfect and precious.” This line makes me nervous. All I can imagine is this little girl growing up and being devastated when some other girl (or a maybe a guy) calls her on her “imperfections.” Or even worse, judging other children like her as imperfect because they’re different. I’ll give the mother credit, I’m sure she’s taken the precautions necessary to make sure her child isn’t that type of person, but not all… Read more »

Apartmentlife
Apartmentlife
10 years ago

Beautiful little girl! I hope she continues to have a great experience as she grows up.

@Bee, I don’t think she meant it that way. I think she’s just saying that according to society, her husband is the representation of true black.

CO
CO
10 years ago

She is such a cutie! Thanks for sharing.

Sasha
Sasha
10 years ago

Beautiful little girl…beautiful mom! I’m more disturbed that people will find negativity in even the most positive situations.

This was a very encouraging post for 4a/b beauties! Thank you! 🙂

cc
cc
10 years ago

I loved this article. It is truly nice to see a mother who cares enough about her daughter to have enough patience to do her hair with love, and to let her know that she is BEAUTIFUL the way god made her. I read some of the comments, and I was surprised that someone could get offended by the fact that the mother lets her daughter know that she is perfect just the way she is. I think that’s our responsiblity as parents. Especially as black women we face so much pressure to conform. We are constantly faced with images… Read more »

Gem
Gem
10 years ago

I am re-posting this on my blog. This makes me so happy, I can’t even tell you! I also did not take her comments in a negative way. As someone with type 3 hair I often get side-eyes and side-mouths when I try to extol the virtues of natural hair to black women I know. We have all heard the “my hair is too nappy” speech. I think it’s wonderful that this woman is raising her type‑4 hair daughter to be natural. It all starts with the children. I think we NEED to see more type 4 reach this length just… Read more »

Ms. Bar B
10 years ago

Simply perfection!! I almost wanted to cry I could relate so much. Relate in the way that, as a child, my hair was just like this… until I got my first perm. Just like her twins, my long hair was destroyed! And just like with her little girl, I wasn’t about to let that happen to my daughter. As a result, my daughter’s hair is nearly the same length as her daughter’s hair is. I even blogged about it after going through a combing out session (adopting the title of your wonderful blog, lol): http://comfortingplace.blogspot.com/2010/01/lil-black-girl-with-long-hair.html Thank you so much for bringing… Read more »

Sherri
Sherri
10 years ago

What a blessing to read about Ayoka and her daughters! Ayoka, thank you for affirming your daughters and not being ashamed to say so! I have always believed good parents protect their children as a mother bear would protect her cubs. Your daughters are blessed to know you love them as God created them and they don’t need to be concerned about others’ opinions. Keep up the good work!

Nikki
Nikki
10 years ago

@ Ms. Wright, I didn’t find the line, “Our job as parents is to make sure they know they are perfect and precious.” to be scary at all. I don’t think her daughter will be devastated when someone later points out her “imperfections” at all, on the contrary, I think she’ll be confident enough to brush the negativity off and believe in herself, because her parents have instilled self confidence and self love in her. I thought this article was so touching, because I wish that I’d been raised to feel this way about myself. My father wasn’t around and it… Read more »

NappySexyFly
NappySexyFly
10 years ago

To anyone it may concern: This is Ayoka. Just wanted all my African sisters to know I love the continent and we are all sisters. Our mother is black and nappy and beautiful. This is something I wanted to express to Africans in the diaspora (American Africans etc) who think a certain way about the Africans they came from (the West Africans with the “tough nigerian hair”). We in the diaspora have been told lies about our mother which has caused us to want to distance ourselves from her. I am trying to show the truth about our African mother.… Read more »

Black Married Momma
10 years ago

Amen. Amen! Amen.

TMS
TMS
10 years ago

@Ayoka’s 1/10/10 comments:

Well said!

May God continue to bless you and your family.

Peace & Blessings,
TMS

” God made us his perfect creation. He made no mistake when he made us black with kinky hair.”-Marcus Garvey

AMarie
10 years ago

@TMS

I LOVE LOVE LOVE that Marcus Garvey quote! There are some days when I just want to tell the nay-sayers “nope, God didn’t make any mistakes with me!”

@Ayoka

Your daughter’s hair is beautiful 😀 I plan to do the same with my daughters- no perms, tex-laxers or anything- just love, care and a little moisturizer 🙂

Bajan Princess 82
Bajan Princess 82
10 years ago

Preach sis! I love how Ayoka focuses on God’s definition of perfection (what we are to Him) and not man’s. I fully support a loving mother instilling pride in her daughter. She will need these lessons as she gets older and life gets tough. Kids (heck, and adults) can be cruel and she needs that strong foundation and support at home.

Afrika
10 years ago

@ BEE

I think you misunderstood what Ayoka was implying. She wasn’t insinuating that if you are not from West Africa, you are not authentically black. A lot of people from East and North Africa tend to have more softer and curlier hair than people from West Africa. She was simply saying that even people from West Africa ( or of West African descent like most African Americans ) can also grow waist-length hair if you take proper care of it.

Afrika
10 years ago

This is a very inspiratinal story. Ayoka, kudos to you for being a strong, educated, beautiful and intelligent black woman. Kudos to you for passing your knowledge to your beautiful daughter.

I think we should not only focus on educating the young girls. We should also educate young black boys too. Young black boys need to learn how to love and appreciate nappy hair on black women and on themselves.

Tiffany
10 years ago

She makes a good point it’s up to the parents to teach their children that they are beautiful.

ms
ms
10 years ago

this is so inspiring.!My reason for being natural is partly because i want to be able to teach my children how to nurture their own hair.What a beautiful chid and her mother should be proud of what hse’s achieved.

Miss Ari
10 years ago

I love her hair! This is definitely inspirational to me. I’ve been Natural for 6 months and have type 4 hair and I definitely learned some tips I’ll be using 🙂

The Notorious Z.A.G.
The Notorious Z.A.G.
10 years ago

Right on, Ayoka! You and your daughter are sheer Black Beauties, and your baby’s hair is fantastic! I’m with you 1000%! I don’t do the hair typing thing, all I can say is no chemicals, no problem! I’m sure your girl will be a kind hearted, well informed and well educated adult, which will be rare in her generation (sad to say, but I think its the truth). Right on!!!

Steph
10 years ago

I must agree with all when I say, I love this story and I’m glad she made the commitment to her daughter’s hair. Beautiful!

Dreamlover225
Dreamlover225
10 years ago

This story brings tears to my eyes. I can’t put it all in words as eloquently as I would like, however, I feel very blessed to have read this. Thank you for taking the time to share your story!

KimDione
KimDione
10 years ago

What a Positive and Beautiful Attitude to have!Im a preschool teacher and I already see little brown girls who only want white dolls and ask why they dont have blonde hair!And this is all before theyve gone into elementary school!Can you imagine being told you are nappyheaded by a little three year old girl.I tried to explain that “OUR” hair is beautiful;but this starts at HOME!!!Honestly affirmation should start as soon as the cradle.When our little girls turn on the tv and go out each day they are bombarded by the medias images of beauty,most of which are the exaxt… Read more »

Leelee
Leelee
10 years ago

Very well-informed article. Her daughter’s hair is beautiful!

I checked out her blog though and was disappointed by the foul language. Definitely was not expecting that, especially from the well-written article featured here.

Krystal
10 years ago

The information Ayoka has shared about 4a/4b haircare is great. The best I’ve read in long while. Thank you!

Rashawn
Rashawn
10 years ago

She is so beautiful. I am jealous that she got to meet Princess Tiana though!

laela
laela
10 years ago

awesome post! I’m going to use these hair tips for myself 🙂

Jc
Jc
10 years ago

Ita Leelee

Matlhodi
10 years ago

Just when I was about to give in to the frustration on managing my li’l girls naps by choppin em off, there came through some light. My girls hair is partly type 3 & 4. Ayoka is just gorgeous & gives me hope that not only my daughter’s hair can get there, but mine also. Nice one, mommy. I also want to instill that kind of confidence in my little girl. Not only that, but also show my son that beauty in a girl/woman doesn’t neccessarily mean straight hair. Mind if I repost this on my blog, miss Leila? **battin… Read more »

luvmylocs
luvmylocs
10 years ago

ayoka you rock!! this is a GREAT story. i love how you broke it all down and spoke in a very personal and genuine way. i don’t have kids yet but when i do i hope i can do as good a job with their hair care as you’ve done with your girls. the time you’ve taken one your daughter’s hair has motivated me as an adult to get off my behind and spend more time nurturing my hair since i want it to be fabulous. again, great tips. thanks! and thanks to the bglh crew for always delivering some… Read more »

sehsi
sehsi
10 years ago

PLEASE send: 501501 text YELE. it is a five dollar donation to disaster relief in haiti if you do not want to do it online with a card. thanks

Be ((((abundantly)))) blessed.

Malorie
10 years ago

Just when I was SO frustrated with my hair, I see this article… thank you so so so much for your story, and for your encouraging words. It’s quite frankly a shame that some other people cannot be as encouraging as you have been 🙂 Those negative thoughts were starting to swim in my head… the, “man, I wish my curls were looser” and “man I just want to cut this sh!t off!” thoughts… so thank you so much for reminding me that I need to be thankful of the head of hair God granted me 🙂 I’m really happy for your little… Read more »

trackback

[…] Originally posted on Nappy Sexy Fly, we found this amazing story on BGLH. Big Thank you to Ayoka for givin’ us the green light to repost it on FC.This is the version […]

Keshia
10 years ago

Hair is so beautiful! Great inspiration for me and everyone out there with natural hair!This should be on the frickin news that wud put relaxer out of business mwahahahahahahahahahahaha! lol If I hav a daughter I will make sure she is bought up like ours <3

Autumn
10 years ago

Beautiful hair. As long as she knows she’s beautiful on the inside, that will reflect the outside as well

ayomide
ayomide
10 years ago

Wish I saw more little beautiful blacks girls with natural hair. It pains me to see little girls with relaxers in their hair. My niece has a relaxer and her hair is short and damaged and she hates to get her hair done. I love your daughters hair and the self love you are instilling in her, more mothers should embrace this attitude

Tawanda
10 years ago

Wow…what an amazing story! I’m so glad she was able to share her regimen with us. I try to use some of those same concepts with my own hair. Her daughter’s hair is Awesome and beautiful!

Zabeth
10 years ago

Hi All! Hello! In the article she talked about how her hair was “4B nappy.” How can one tell? Where would I be able to find out about the nappiness grading system? Sorry if this question has been asked an answered already- you can email me directly at zabeth91@yahoo.com. Thx.

Lydia
Lydia
10 years ago

Your daughter has very beautiful Hair! I do have issue with the statement ‘no recent interruption of my African bloodline, in other words not mixed.‘Have you research your family tree? I had my family history compiled and I found bloodline link to Belgium and India.My mom is African-American and Brazilian and my dad was Cherokee and Moroccan. My husband is Spanish and my children are quite multiracial. Is it really an “interruption” to have different ethnicities in a family tree? You cant segregate love.

Cyan
Cyan
9 years ago
Reply to  Lydia

The point she is trying to make is that most people think that the only way African hair can grow long is though having a mixing of races. I think that way some times too. For instance when different races mix — a African and a East Indian have children the hair is usually long, thick and curly.
So I understand that she just means that there is no mixing in her blood line — their are both of the African race and their child has extremely long hair!!

Cinnamondiva
Cinnamondiva
9 years ago
Reply to  Lydia

This is a cute little girl. Lydia…I’m of mixed race as well. I’m not offended by the author’s statement because there is clearly no hate behind it.

Yes, some people do look down on biracial/multiracial people and this is unfortunate. But the author wasn’t doing this at all. BTW, not all Black people are mixed. Some people have no recent admixture in their families at all. Clarence Thomas is one such person. He has no European ancestry.

Alicia
Alicia
10 years ago

aaaaaaaaaaaaaw my god! she’s got the most beautufuLLest hair i’ve seen, word! … i would love to grow out my little sisters(4) hair like this! thanks sooooooooo much for sharing ur regimen!

trackback

[…] “Mom Grows Out Daughter’s Kinky Natural Hair To Waist Length” […]

Nikki
Nikki
10 years ago

Wow … great blog! I wish my mother had the same approach to my hair when I was little. Unfortunately I had the creamy crack treatment at 5 years old (which is TRULY a shame) and I’ve had a love-hate relationship with my hair ever since.

Victoria
Victoria
10 years ago

I wish I had read this before I permed my daughter’s hair about 2 weeks ago. She is 9 and I finally got frustrated and gave up on her hair. Ironically, I thought “braiding” was breaking her hair off. It is too late for my daughter’s hair since I just permed it? What should I do now. My hair is still natural and it has broken off because I got braids last year and have been in a wig every since. I will definitely begin using these techniques for my hair. Thanks for this post.

Michelle
Michelle
10 years ago

This is so inspirational! Thank you so much for sharing this story.

Leo the Yardie Chick
Leo the Yardie Chick
10 years ago

AWESOME! I wish this information was around when I was a child. My mother had NO IDEA what to do with my thick hair and I grew to hate it as a result. Now that I’m transitioning, I’m taking it upon myself to learn how to care for my natural hair and, by extension, my daughters’ hair if I am ever blessed with them.

Leo the Yardie Chick
Leo the Yardie Chick
10 years ago

just one question though — you said you don’t use blow dryers or heat on her hair. I assume that means you leave it to air-dry, or do you wrap it in a towel? I’m just wondering how to control the dripping with the air-dry method.

Suryah
10 years ago

I am not going to tell you I have not seen hair like this on African American little girls. Because I certainly have. Not a whole lot but I have. And I was as awwwwed!! then as I am with your little girl. But SADLY these babies all had RELAXED hair. Except for one little girl in the elementary school I taught at. Her braids were so beautiful, she too had hair type, around 4a or 4b. I thought she was the most beautiful little chocolate girl with hair down to her booty. She was only in the First grade then. Imagine… Read more »

JAAR
JAAR
10 years ago

Lydia, Why too deep honey she was not being negative when she said no interruption to the bloodline. It was a way to simply say that she was not mixed that she knows of. My God…SMH.

In any event great job mom–love the story.

Lydia
Lydia
10 years ago

@ JAAR

That she knows of” My Point EXACTLY!!!I did my research And I KNOW exactly what I AM!!She comes across like she look down on Mixed ppl! REsearch your family tree then get back to me!No need to use GOD’s name in Vain, either JAAR!!!

Raven
Raven
9 years ago
Reply to  Lydia

i think you just misconceived her message. I don’t think she looks down on people with mixed heritage, she only said that to disprove the so-called fact that Black people cannot grow long hair without having some sort close mixed ethnicity. In no way she is expressing any hatred or anything negative towards people who are mixed.

Barbara
Barbara
9 years ago
Reply to  Lydia

Way to miss the point there, sport.

Lydia
Lydia
10 years ago

Shake yo’ Head at THAT, Jaar!!!

BABS
BABS
9 years ago
Reply to  Lydia

why are you so upset? I know exactly what she means & it wasn’t in any negative manner. Im from Ghana too, i have very thick long hair that i have to relax constantly & even when i do, it still looks unprocessed. I literally have to argue most of the time with people who tell me i need a perm when i just probably got one 2 weeks prior. They insist im mixed & there is no way my hair could 100% African hair but i was born & bred in Ghana all my life. Its frustrating hearing that all the… Read more »

Mary
Mary
8 years ago
Reply to  Lydia

Seriously, how many different people need to explain to you what she meant for you to calm down? It’s unfortunate that she had to make that statement at all but it was made for those that believe people of black ancestry cannot grow long hair without being mixed. (It’s a silly idea I myself belived until learning more about proper haircare.)And yes, you’re right she may not know her *exact* ancestry as you do but whether or not she is “mixed” by your definition or anyone elses has no bearing on the fact that she and her daughter have 4a/4b… Read more »

Cassie-O
Cassie-O
10 years ago

She said she had no RECENT interruption to her bloodline. Everyone is mixed. Some are just mixed farther down the bloodline. She was just trying to state that she is mainly of african descent. I don’t see anything offensive with that statement. If you want to be technical i’m sure her Ghanian husband has a “mixed” blood line as well.

BABS
BABS
9 years ago
Reply to  Cassie-O

if he is 100% Ghanaian then no.. unless he’s not then that’s a whole different story.

Ray Morris
Ray Morris
10 years ago

Bravo!!!.….….….You also have a great writing style.

Malantha
Malantha
10 years ago

What an inspirational and informative article!
However, I didn’t think she was being disrespectful to mixed race people at all!
I think the point that she was making, is that it is often assumed that you can only achieve the length and texture that her daughter has if you have mixed heritage.
What Ayoka illustrates is that it is the treatment of the hair that determines its condition, not any kind of blood line.

Ericka
Ericka
10 years ago

Jeez louise.… Can she be “black and proud”? We got so many blacks that have not a clue where they come from claiming to be mixed because they shamed to just be plain black. Give this woman a break for proclaiming that she African since we’s all African anyway. Anyway where does this thinking that “we are all mixed” come from? It is not a common assumption that every non-black person is mixed so why is there one when it comes to blacks? The battle against the black diaspora must stop. Sure some are mixed but I highly doubt if… Read more »

summer-daze
summer-daze
10 years ago

I agree with you, Ericka! 150%!!

LALA
LALA
10 years ago

Geez people always need a reason to be offended. She is saying her daughter has all that length without being mixed. Her dad is 100% Black from Africa and mom has no recent mix. Geez

tinimichi
tinimichi
10 years ago

Both of my parents are Ghanaian, so I never thought my hair would ever be able to pass shoulder length. This really gives me hope! 😀

Leslie
10 years ago
bahgirl96
bahgirl96
9 years ago

This is wonderful, a strong African-american mother teaching her young daughter about natural hair and being confident in it. God bless 🙂

NappyMarge
9 years ago

Nice that the mom has also stayed natural herself! Great job

Laura
Laura
9 years ago

Really impressed with this. Really deflated with my own efforts; it has been a year and my hair is breaking more than ever. What do you consider a “thick moisturizer?” I think this is what my regimen lacks…

Inka
9 years ago

What a stunning little girl! I hope my babies are as gorgeous as her! Keep up the good work, she’s lovely.

Kim
Kim
9 years ago

I love your daughter’s hair!!! my daughter has the same texture as your little one and her hair is down her back as well, but I ran into difficulties as it grew out, there was SO MUCH MORE. But after reading your post you gAve me hope!! i think where I was going wrong i was going at it everyday and it became overwhelming now I know to keep it up at least a week, because her hair will not last that long. But thanks for sharing!!!!

Maxjobs
9 years ago

This app for iPhone looks for work worldwide. Maxjobs is fast and efficient.

Jayell
Jayell
9 years ago

my mom used to braid our hair and it was down our backs. then we got the relaxers, and well you know the rest of the story. I admit that I still use relaxers (twice per year) but if I had a daughter I’d definitely do what you do now with her. Teach her how to take care of her natural locks — thanks for your post!

Kiyah
Kiyah
9 years ago

her hair is pretty and long.

kim p
kim p
9 years ago

my hair was just like hers when i was younger i bnegged my mom to perm my hair at like 12 i think and she did. ow my hair is mid back length i have about and ich and 1/2 of new growth trying to get back to natural. i use natural products essential oils on my hair its been growing fast. Im black both my parents black. I consider myself to be african. I take care of my hair no heat, no petroleum based products

Danni
9 years ago

What a beautiful family! Love this!

Charmaine
Charmaine
9 years ago

Her daughter is beautiful! I have a 6 yr old daughter, who’s hair I keep natural as well, she is the reason I decided to go natural. I hate to see little girls, especially those under 4 with relaxers. My daughter’s hair is right past her shoulders and very curly, I definitely will try this with her hair. I have learned a lot more about her hair since becoming natural myself.

Latreice
Latreice
9 years ago

So true! That’s all natural hair needs: Nurturing. Soft touch. Moisture Moisture and more Moisture!!!

Lyn
Lyn
9 years ago

I will have to share this with my sister who now has two children, one who’s hair is 4b and 4c. I should share this with my mom as well, she hates that I keep my hair in braids 97% of the time! I try to tell her, I’ll see the benefits soon. Lol! Great read.

Eliada Maldonado
Eliada Maldonado
8 years ago

THAT’S IT!!! Curly hair rocks! I was almost in tears reading this. I am transitioning to my natural hair and I was not expecting to see so much information, blogs, suggestions, products and testimonies on growing natural hair. I have never seen so much beautiful hair in its natural state EVER!!! I really believe that more and more women are excepting who they are and what they look like and are embracing the beauty they do not need to alter. I LOVE IT! I see God! I see God moving in the hearts of women and I thank you all… Read more »

podsłuchy na telefon
8 years ago

I simply desired to thank you very much once more. I do not know what I would have made to happen in the absence of these information contributed by you concerning such subject. It had become an absolute alarming circumstance in my circumstances, but coming across this expert form you handled the issue took me to cry with fulfillment. I’m just happier for your work and even hope you realize what an amazing job you were putting in educating the others with the aid of your webblog. I am certain you haven’t encountered all of us.

small business strategy

I like what you guys are up also. Such clever work and reporting! Keep up the superb works guys I¡¦ve incorporated you guys to my blogroll. I think it’ll improve the value of my website 🙂

Cacey
Cacey
8 years ago

what’s so sad about this though.…is how many of us would love to have this little girl’s hair but without having to wear it in braids or plaits all the time. it’s great for little children. in fact, my hair was midback length when i was 12 simply because it was ALWAYS in braids/twists and the like, and didn’t get touched but maybe once or twice a month. but if you like loose-hanging hair and have highly textured ethnic hair, then it’s like battling against the hair gods to get adequate length retention. so i mean, i don’t think it’s… Read more »

Shannon
Shannon
7 years ago
Reply to  Cacey

LOL, good point. Before my mom got me a perm, I was DRAPING, but I did wear it in braids EVERYDAY (my mom was one of those moms who felt like little Black girls shouldn’t wear their hair down because it was too “grown”).

It is hard to grow your hair out like that without wearing it in protective styles this much.

Jack
Jack
7 years ago
Reply to  Cacey

Some parents and adults don’t do this to their children’s hair (and some adults don’t do this to their own hair), that’s the point too. If it’s not informative for you skip it. This is new information for some, and for some that know this, but are glad to see the results and positivity of patience and love. Also braid are and options for adults that want to retain length and still look mature. You can still where it out, but not every single day, and if so you MUST take the time time to be gentle and detangle it… Read more »

jacqueline youg
8 years ago

multi-vitamins/mineral supplement, b‑vitamin complex; essential for
hair growth; gelatin capsules; all very affordable; have been shown
to grow hair one inch per month.
jamaican castor oil mixed with castor oil and a carrier oil to dilute
the smell, perhaps tea tree oil; is known to aide in hair grown.
good luck ladies.
the little girl is adorable.

Sharli
Sharli
8 years ago

She’s sooo adorable. She gives me hope about my hair. Im goin natural…

Valentina
8 years ago

Wow, that’s what I was searching for, what a information! present here at this website, thanks admin of this site.

Emon
Emon
8 years ago

beautiful I was searching for something on hair growth for my daughter..I believe she has the same same type of hair very,very thick and tight curls..but she has a disability and constantly pulls and plays in her hair..less manipulation is true..I keep hair in two strand twists after this article..I will start co-washing and less manipulation..I am bringing her to get her ends clipped..and will follow this regiment..thanks 🙂

Leah
8 years ago

What kind of products u use in her hair?

Jessica
Jessica
7 years ago

I hate the word nappy.

Kay
Kay
7 years ago

i appreciate this article for what it is .. and feel it can be used as a teaching tool. HOWEVER i do not appreciate the constant use of the word “nappy”. curly or kinky texture is just fine thank you.

Shannon
Shannon
7 years ago
Reply to  Kay

Its a personal matter, IMO. The author obviously doesn’t have the same feelings about “nappy” as you do, so there’s no reason to “please and thank you” about it as if your feelings should be her feelings.

I’d much rather use the word “nappy” than “kinky” because the latter is also used to describe types of sex. But I’d never even think of suggesting to someone else that they can’t use it.

Eloisa
Eloisa
7 years ago
Reply to  Shannon

I know a lot of people here love to call their hair nappy, but afro-textured hair is not nappy. It has curls, kinks, coils and waves in it. So it is curly/kinky/coily/wavy. That is our hair texture/ the shape of our hair strands. The word kink has nothing to do with sex, but with the obvious ‘kinks’ in our hairstrands. The word nappy is described as hair that ‘looks like wool’ (an animal’s fur). And best believe that is not a coincidence. Have you guys noticed that the word nappy refers to the overall ‘look’ of afro-textured hair (not its… Read more »

I am I
I am I
7 years ago
Reply to  Eloisa

Nappy is another word for “diaper” in England.…

Gina
Gina
7 years ago
Reply to  Kay

I don’t care for the word “nappy” either, but I feel like there are some black women who use the word consistently to describe type 4 hair, so in this case, use of the word helps to reinforce to those women that this little girl simply does not have stereotypical “good” hair — and that any woman with kinky hair can look this healthy, if only they will let go of the relaxer!

gapch
gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  Kay

kinky is no better than nappy.

D.P. to gapch
D.P. to gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  gapch

Kinky = Nappy. You can change the word all day long but everyone knows what you mean lol. Ten years ago you would’ve used nappy to describe your kinks. I think it should be embraced. It’s a word that has been with our ethnicity since the dawn of time. We are trying so hard to embrace our natural roots, nappy should just come along with it. Instead of keeping the negative connotation we should make nappy into a positive word. The way it was used in this story was not the least bit offensive to me. If someone says your… Read more »

Kelly
Kelly
6 years ago
Reply to  gapch

I prefer to say tightly coiled or type 4 hair and leave it at that. However, I know it’s all semantics and using “kinky,” “naps,” “nappy” is a personal preference. It’s sort of the way SOME (not all) Black people feel when some rappers use the word “nigga.” It might be okay if the rapper has it in the rhyme a few times while you’re dancing to it and getting your party on, but after the 10th time at an arena in front of a sea of White people parroting the word after the rapper in concert, you might wish… Read more »

Lauryn
Lauryn
7 years ago

I think what you’re doing is great, but keep in mind your daughter will grow up one day and what she wants to do with her hair, she will. I don’t like how the black community acts like hair is community property. No “vow” will change the fact that being natural or chemically/heat treating hair is a personal choice once we reach adulthood.

T.
T.
7 years ago
Reply to  Lauryn

You have negative votes but I understand the essence of what you are saying and agree. Have a childhood friend whose hair was locc’ed from age 3 to late 20s recently. She first experimented with coloring, then wigs and then chopped them and wears straight styles(non chemical). Her mom wasn’t thrilled but my friend wanted something different and figures she can always grow it back ‑its just hair. I grew up natural and braided, begged my mom to straighten my hair. It was a nightmare since she has a different texture(stereotypical “good” hair that requires little maintenance, fast growing, thick… Read more »

Ki Ki
Ki Ki
7 years ago

I agree with Kay… She used the word “nappy” as if it was a 4‑letter curse word. Please look up the origin of hte word before using it so redundantly.

Cece Danielle
Cece Danielle
7 years ago

Yes! This is how we take care of our little girl’s kinky hair. When I have kids, my kids’ hair will only be treated with TLC.

Jumoké
Jumoké
7 years ago

1. Why did she over use the word nappy? Every time she said it it felt like she cursed. 2. Why did she describe her husband like that? I’m west African also an I found it offensive. Does she not know that there are different tribes in Africa and they are all unique? Just because he’s Ghanaian doesn’t mean he ABSOLUTELY is going to be dark and have extremely kinky hair. Just saying. 3. In regards to her daughter’s hair I loved it and hope she keeps her regimen up until she’s old enough to make her own decisions. I… Read more »

Shanique
Shanique
7 years ago

The condescending tone of this article took away from what it was supposed to be. Either way she is a beautiful little girl

Angela
Angela
5 years ago
Reply to  Shanique

I thought it was just me. This article annoyed me so much. It was so negative and condescending. Why did she have to even mention some of the things she did just to talk about her daughter’s hair?

Saye
Saye
7 years ago

I like how she is taking good care of her daughter’s hair and her hair is beautiful and healthy. On the other hand, I despise the fact she kept using the word nappy. Furthermore, when she was describing her husband being a West African, she made it seemed as if all West Africans or Africans; hair textures, skin tones, and features are what she described her husband. I don’t know what Ghanaian tribe her husband comes from; however the Ashanti women/girls hair grows so long and to their backs. Lastly, I have some family members whose hair types are 3a‑c… Read more »

Cinny
Cinny
7 years ago

everyone always gotta feel offensive over something. boo whoo. She used nappy because she wanted to. If you rather use the word “kinky” to define hair, don’t mean everyone else has to. I rather use nappy myself because kinky sounds more like a sexual act & why would you use that to describe a child’s hair? anyway…back to the point. She’s SO CUTE! I LOVE LOVE LOVE your daughters hair, I’m so glad you don’t want to perm it! I got my first perm at age 2, yes TWO YEARS OLD! I didn’t start transitioning til i was 15t (5… Read more »

Kelly
Kelly
7 years ago
Reply to  Cinny

Thank you!!! So many complaining whiny people ready to pounce on others.… Kick back and relax…gosh

Dieyna
Dieyna
7 years ago

Hello. I have to say that I am proud of her for the hair regimen she found for that precious little girl and for her pride !!! I am an African born women and I have to say that WE African women either we have a lot of complexes either we are proud all over our head. For example if someone says to me that I am a nigger I would agree and so what ?! I guess this poor African-American lady just learned with her African husband how to be proud and to leave all the complexes behind because… Read more »

Jada
Jada
7 years ago

Your daughter is beautiful! I love your attitude about making sure she loves herself, and that you’re keeping her free of chemicals. My mom made me suffer through painful pressing sessions, and I hated it. I also don’t mind your use of the word nappy.

Natural Glory
Natural Glory
7 years ago

Wow…can black women ever just unify on anything…tit for tat in everything…it is exhausting.

Dieyna
Dieyna
7 years ago
Reply to  Natural Glory

Hello Natural Glory. I think that you can cross black. Women in general all over the world won’t ever unify 😉

Eloisa
Eloisa
7 years ago
Reply to  Natural Glory

Women or people all over the world don’t unify on everything. That’s what keeps life interesting. But somehow when black women disagree on something some people assume it has something to do with the color of our skin? And somehow that means we don’t unify on anything? Really?

Ellie
Ellie
7 years ago
Reply to  Eloisa

It has nothing to do with the color of our skin, but the culture in which we are raised. All cultures all over the world have their issues, but for some reason there is no group so ready to tear into each other like black women. There is always something to fight about or judge who/what is best or something crazy like that. At the same time, there’s no group that has supported me more than black women, and no one who understands each other as well as black women. I guess it’s two sides of the same coin.…

Sooo True
7 years ago
Reply to  Natural Glory

THANK YOUUUU!!! My GOD. All sooo bitter and angry over NOTHING! Sheesh!!

linnie
linnie
7 years ago

You’re doing such a great job with your daughter, including her natural hair. I regret not keeping my daughter natural. Now that she is grown, she abhors the idea of going natural, even though her straight hair looks terrible. Good for you!

MrsGlam
7 years ago

I remember reading this article years ago, but I didn’t comment. Some of the previous commenters made me laugh: huffy over the use of the word “nappy”, questioning whether the author should teach her child that she is precious and perfect, criticizing the author because she mentioned that she doesn’t have any recent admixture in her bloodline … This is what happens when any and everybody has access to the internet LOL! They look to be offended even when, clearly, this article wasn’t offensive AT ALL. I hope that they continue to mature and grow in their critical thinking and… Read more »

Oats22
Oats22
7 years ago

Ahh, the picture with Princess Tiana, so precious! Her daughter is so lovely, and her hair looks so healthy and pretty! I don’t like to use the word “nappy” either, because nappy to me means aggressively tangled, dry, unattractive, and has an inherently negative connotation. I’m learning not to be irked when I hear some other people use it, like this mom, because the word obviously doesn’t mean that to her. To her, “Nappy” means “type 4b” and there’s no negative connotation. I wish there was an entirely different word sometimes, not nappy, not kinky, not curly (because, not all… Read more »

gapch
gapch
7 years ago
Reply to  Oats22

there are plenty of other words to use. springy, coily, tightly curled, shrunken, extremely curly, bouncy.…
kinky is just as derogatory as nappy as has been used as an insult for just as long

Oma Cams
7 years ago

Great goods from you, man. I’ve bear in mind your stuff previous to and you’re just too great. I really like what you have got here, certainly like what you’re stating and the way in which by which you assert it. You are making it enjoyable and you still take care of to keep it wise. I can’t wait to read far more from you. That is really a tremendous web site.

Madametj
Madametj
7 years ago

OK, lets get real people, she used the word nappy like 4 times, and no it is not a swear word. I used to be one that cringed at the word nappy–thinking of it as the N‑word equivalent for hair. But many people use the word nappy simply to describe “type 4” hair. Another natural hair guru explained that she uses the word “nappy” because most little girls say that they don’t like nappy (read: natural, type 4) hair, so she uses the word “nappy” in a positive light to make them think twice. Its another “to each his own”… Read more »

Rafaella
Rafaella
7 years ago

Can we black women cut out all the cattiness and appreciate each other genuinely for once? Hate and inferiority complex are definitely dangerous diseases. Why did she use the woed “nappy”? She shouldn’t have used the woed “nappy”!Chill!It had no offensive connotation. Ayoka, thank you for such an educational post and for you all : THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS “BAD HAIR”; ANY unhealthy or unkempt hair is bad hair. Healthy, well groomed hair is “good hair” no matter its texture. Just as there are no ugly women; only lazy and/or ignorant women. Thanx once again AYOKA. Looking forward… Read more »

Nik
Nik
7 years ago

While I had no problem with the word nappy-the tone of this post is arrogant and combative. Its almost as if the writer has an axe to grind and finally found herself a soapbox. I hope I misinterpreted — for her daughter’s sake. She is beautiful and does have beautiful hair.

None
None
7 years ago

Beautiful girl, beautiful hair…but I am part Ghanaian/Nigerian and Ghana is not home to the “darkest” Africans. Visit Uganda, visit South Sudan. Both are filled with beautiful folks with darker skin than Ghanaians.

Steph
Steph
7 years ago

I’m all for taking care of hair, but this regime sounds like a bit of a nuisance. While I don’t perm my hair or use chemicals I still enjoy my Afro. I don’t pull it or put stress on my scalp constantly, but if I want it straight , I press it. I wear it up, down, braids, etc. there is no point in having long beautiful hair that I’m too afraid to touch

Samantha
Samantha
7 years ago

I have been natural for a little more than 5 years and my transition was extremely smooth. I am half Ghanaian and my hair is actually very curly. But the essence of Blackness is beautiful variety so we shouldn’t get so Hung up on texture and skin color I’m excited that I will one day have the opportunity to have little beautiful black natural haired children.

Melissa
Melissa
7 years ago

I really wish people would stop referring to their hair as nappy.

Khala
Khala
7 years ago
Reply to  Melissa

i feel that nappy is such a negative word, especially to describe our hair. i know i hate it when other people call my hair nappy (ive got that 4b hair, and it tends to look like a giant tumbleweed when i just let it air dry after wetting) it feels like you just called me ugly or something. it hurts my heart, and gets me a little angry.

Christine
Christine
6 years ago
Reply to  Melissa

Thank you!!! Oh my gosh, that word makes me cringe! I almost stopped reading the article. Like do you have no understanding of where that word comes from? And don’t hit me with that “context” crap…

ILOVENATURALS
ILOVENATURALS
7 years ago

She is absolutely ADORABLE! I too wanted to tear up with this article, cause I too had mid back length 4b/c hair until it was permed at 4 yrs old.….after that it was weaves/glues, more perms…then lace front wigs then NO HAIRLINE = (

I’m in early 20’s and have been for 6 months natural and I’m loving every minute of it, my future children will be all natural as well.

trackback

[…] article is a favorite on my other blog, Black Girl with Long Hair, so I’m re-posting it […]

cd
cd
7 years ago

love your tips and your daughter hair is very beautiful she is very beautiful and I love how you tell her that she is
but our hair is KINKY not NAPPY
NAPPY is a slave term it was what slave masters used to describe our beautiful hair they though was ugly
and now we use it like it’s no big deal well it is
and we are all beautiful

Sandy
Sandy
7 years ago

Nappy? I hate that word. Why would you write an article referring to your daughter’s hair as nappy? It’s kinky. Kinky! Nappy is such a slave word. I can’t believe you!

Regina
Regina
7 years ago

What a great inspiring story! I have been natural for aprox 3 yrs. I just turned 49 in Sept. I read your story last yr and was greatly inspired! I thought if braiding helps her hair to grow, then I’ll give it a try. I’v been braiding it once a week, keep it moisturized. My hair has grown pass
wavy and curly! I use no heat or any chemical

Claudette
7 years ago

I just wanted to commend you on the wonderful job you are doing taking care of your daughter’s hair. It is absolutely beautiful and looks really healthy. I have 2 teen daughters whose hair have been natural all their lives and now have long healthy and beautiful hair. Like you I’ve learned to take care of their hair without the chemical and they are so happy for that. I really think regardless of texture we can all have that beautiful healthy hair with proper care. Braiding, cornrow, twist are good for growing out hair.

Chrystal
Chrystal
6 years ago

I’m actually full blooded Ghanian from both sides of my family as well. I had the same problem with a relaxer. After i began transitioning about a year ago, i felt uncomfortable to walk around in public with my hair length, because of how much hair was shedding. I went off to doing box braids after another. I learned that after all many years of relaxing, my hairline was messed up, and i developed some type of ringworm on the sides of my hair which also caused my hairline to mess up

folamix
folamix
6 years ago

I know some folks feel that nappy gives off a negative connotation. But quite honestly I don’t. My hair kinky, nappy, coily, however you chose to refer to it. It is what it is. BUT IT IS MINE.

Q
Q
6 years ago

So adorable! I can’t believe people are getting offended because she called HER and HER daughters nappy.She is probably comfortable with the word which is why she uses it. Like how many times do u hear the word n*gga nowadays the connotation of the word is obviously changing just like the word nappy! Future generations are probably gonna use the word with a positive connotation to describe their beautiful hair.

Amma
Amma
6 years ago

Beautiful daughter! I also am natural and take great care of my hair and live in a predominantly white community but everyone loves my hair and asks to touch it! Oh and I’m full Ghanaian! I love my hair and it’s amazing to see other little girls loving their hair too!

Nothabo Hadebe
Nothabo Hadebe
6 years ago

I remember I did this to my hair for two years and I managed to retain all my length. This is a good regimen. Low manipulation and keeping it moisturised.

Lioness
6 years ago

OMG, can’t we ever have an article on this site where people actually appreciate the information provided in the article vs. finding something to criticize? Why are we as Black women our own worst enemy? Instead of uplifting & encouraging one another, some Black women are ALWAYS looking for things to critique & ways to tear other Black women down. If the author didn’t appreciate natural hair, she wouldn’t encourage it in her children; take the time to care for their hair; nor take the time to write & post an article to help others care for their own natural… Read more »

Emmzi
Emmzi
6 years ago

Wow. Beautiful daughter and I’m glad you love her and take good care of her and her hair! 🙂

I think I’m going to try this for my hair because you clearly know how to take care of African hair.

Kelly
Kelly
6 years ago

For me nappy means Natural+hAPPY =NAPPY
Why are U offended
Love this cute pie hair so beautiful

Tanya
Tanya
6 years ago

I saw this article a few weeks ago, showed your beautiful daughter to my daughters and now they want me to help them grow their hair. I must admit that I have been very bad at managing their hair and mine. As a result of this, however, I decided that I was going to put more effort into managing thier hair. I am already seeing the results. I have been natural for almost 6 years and have always kept my hair short…mainly because I am too lazy to be bothered with it. I have also decided to grow mine as… Read more »

Jasmine
Jasmine
6 years ago

My daughters hair has been like this since she was born I put very little work into assisting it with growing it just does it naturally. I’ve had people ask me what I do to get it thick and long and when I say nothing I get stared at like I’m lying. I’ve had people ask if her hair was weave. All you have to do is very little and keep chemicals out of it. Moisturize, moisturize, moisturze. Also finding the right products not all products are for all natural hair types trail and error 🙂

sanjidude
sanjidude
5 years ago

I highly recommend not chemically altering a child’s hair just to make it easier on the parent. As a child, my hair was long and beautiful up until it was relaxed. After that, it never grew past my shoulders and was always thin and see through. As a 50+ natural for just over 3 years, my hair that would never grow now never breaks and is longer and thicker than it’s ever been (past bra strap). For those kinky haired women who are frustrated that their hair won’t grow, it’s highly likely due to lye being applied to your scalp… Read more »

missnoel1913
missnoel1913
5 years ago

I absolutely hate the word nappy.

bsbfankaren
bsbfankaren
5 years ago

My daughter was told from the time she was born that she was beautiful, that her brown skin was gorgeous and that her curly hair was to die for. Unfortunately eventually she went to elementary school and was told that no she was not beautiful, that her curly hair was not long and straight enough and that her beautiful brown eyes were not light enough, and eventually the talk of those she interacted with everyday took it’s toll and she began to feel she was less than other’s. It took years to turn that around, but let’s not kid ourselves… Read more »

NHCN
5 years ago

Like I always say, embrace the afro flower (http://www.naturalhaircarenews.com/2015/02/24/the-power-of-the-afro-flower/). That’ll be one awesome afro for the kid!

Leah Barnett
Leah Barnett
5 years ago

This post gives me hope for the future generations. If this beautiful little brown girl is aware of her natural, untamed beauty, that goes to show that we as beautiful brown women can accept ourselves for who we are also. It is not necessary for us to try to fit in with the European standards of beauty. I grew up natural with the blow-drier and hot comb. My mom didn’t let me chemically enhance my hair (perm it) until I was 16, after much pleading and prodding, and it was the biggest hair mistake of my life. My hair broke… Read more »

Aliyah
Aliyah
5 years ago

I think she is a gorgeous brown baby and has gorgeous kinky hair NOT NAPPY . WE NEED TO GET RID OF THAT SLAVE TERM !

Imade Iyamu
5 years ago

this is the best hair resource i’ve ever seen for type4 hair. love this.

The Darling Kinkshamer
The Darling Kinkshamer
5 years ago

I agree, I prefer “tightly coiled” or “kinky coily.”

Lex
Lex
4 years ago

Yes, nappy can be used as a derogatory term but like many derogatory terms could be used as a neutral or positive term. Since her mom most likely has kinky hair as well and she’s using it in a positive manner I don’t think it’s wrong to use it.

Brittney Cobb
Brittney Cobb
4 years ago

Guys I need as much advice as possible I’ve tried everything but nothing works..her hair is dry and doesn’t seem to grow well in areas I try to keep braids in it but it’s so soft and thin that she looses the whole plat or twist when taking it down..help

Day day
Day day
5 years ago

This is nothing new, growing up as a 80’s baby my mom never permed or straighten my hair. It was always washed and braided every Sunday. When I see little girls with weaves and perms it is foreign to me.
I couldn’t cut or perm my hair until I went to highschool.
After years of perms and cuts I am trying to go back natural but it is hard because I don’t have the patience.
Glad I have boys and not girls!!!

La Bella Bre'
La Bella Bre'
5 years ago

The word nappy refers to the nap in a carpet or rug. Why are we using this term? It is a derogatory term.…I don’t think any woman wants the smell of her lady parts referred to as “fishy” or “skunky,” so why do we continue to call our glorious hair “nappy?”

Denyce
4 years ago

I love this and will try with my daughter. I messed her hair up when I did a texturizer trying to loosen the curl and it took her hair out eventually. I have been putting little weaves in but will start doing some braid patterns and washing as you stated and moisturizing as well. She is almost 11 and her hair is really short now and she wants her hair long like the other nationalities in her class. They don’t understand her hair and sometimes make fun of it but she is very strong minded and tried not to let… Read more »

Lexi
Lexi
3 years ago

” Moisture is key for type 4 hair because as we all know it’s drier than a dessert”

lol dry like a cake? or a brownie? Maybe ice cream? Or are you trying to say desert?

178
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x

Shopping Cart