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natural hair gets no love in the dominican republic?

Avatar • Jul 12, 2009

***Update 7/13/2009… Two individuals quoted in this article have written letters of protest about the way their comments were construed. Instead of posting the letters here, I am going to provide a link. I read through the letters and did not feel that they took anything away from the main point of the article; that there exists in the Dominican Republic a resistance to being termed African or black. However I do think they are worth reading. Here is the link to the letters.***


This is an article from the Miami Herald that was originally published in June 2007:

Black Denial
By Frances Robles
frobles@miamiherald.com

SANTO DOMINGO — Yara Matos sat still while long, shiny locks from China were fastened, bit by bit, to her coarse hair.

Not that Matos has anything against her natural curls, even though Dominicans call that pelo malo — bad hair.

But a professional Dominican woman just should not have bad hair, she said. “If you’re working in a bank, you don’t want some barrio-looking hair. Straight hair looks elegant,” the bank teller said. “It’s not that as a person of color I want to look white. I want to look pretty.”

And to many in the Dominican Republic, to look pretty is to look less black.

Dominican hairdressers are internationally known for the best hair-straightening techniques. Store shelves are lined with rows of skin whiteners, hair relaxers and extensions.

Racial identification here is thorny and complex, defined not so much by skin color but by the texture of your hair, the width of your nose and even the depth of your pocket. The richer, the “whiter.” And, experts say, it is fueled by a rejection of anything black.

I always associated black with ugly. I was too dark and didn’t have nice hair,” said Catherine de la Rosa, a dark-skinned Dominican-American college student spending a semester here. “With time passing, I see I’m not black. I’m Latina.

At home in New York everyone speaks of color of skin. Here, it’s not about skin color. It’s culture.”

The only country in the Americas to be freed from black colonial rule — neighboring Haiti — the Dominican Republic still shows signs of racial wounds more than 200 years later. Presidents historically encouraged Dominicans to embrace Spanish Catholic roots rather than African ancestry.

Here, as in much of Latin America — the “one drop rule” works in reverse: One drop of white blood allows even very dark-skinned people to be considered white.

LACK OF INTEREST

As black intellectuals here try to muster a movement to embrace the nation’s African roots, they acknowledge that it has been a mostly fruitless cause. Black pride organizations such as Black Woman’s Identity fizzled for lack of widespread interest. There was outcry in the media when the Brotherhood of the Congos of the Holy Spirit — a community with roots in Africa — was declared an oral patrimony of humanity by UNESCO. “There are many times that I think of just leaving this country because it’s too hard,” said Juan Rodríguez Acosta, curator of the Museum of the Dominican Man. Acosta, who is black, has pushed for the museum to include controversial exhibits that reflect many Dominicans’ African background. “But then I think: Well if I don’t stay here to change things, how will things ever change?”

A walk down city streets shows a country where blacks and dark-skinned people vastly outnumber whites, and most estimates say that 90 percent of Dominicans are black or of mixed race. Yet census figures say only 11 percent of the country’s nine million people are black.

To many Dominicans, to be black is to be Haitian. So dark-skinned Dominicans tend to describe themselves as any of the dozen or so racial categories that date back hundreds of years — Indian, burned Indian, dirty Indian, washed Indian, dark Indian, cinnamon, moreno or mulatto, but rarely negro.

The Dominican Republic is not the only nation with so many words to describe skin color. Asked in a 1976 census survey to describe their own complexions, Brazilians came up with 136 different terms, including café au lait, sunburned, morena, Malaysian woman, singed and “toasted.”

The Cuban black was told he was black. The Dominican black was told he was Indian,” said Dominican historian Celsa Albert, who is black. “I am not Indian. That color does not exist. People used to tell me, ‘You are not black.’ If I am not black, then I guess there are no blacks anywhere, because I have curly hair and dark skin.”

THE HISTORY

Using the word Indian to describe dark-skinned people is an attempt to distance Dominicans from any African roots, Albert and other experts said. She noted that it’s not even historically accurate: The country’s Taino Indians were virtually annihilated in the 1500s, shortly after Spanish colonizers arrived.

Researchers say the de-emphasizing of race in the Dominican Republic dates to the 1700s, when the sugar plantation economy collapsed and many slaves were freed and rose up in society.

Later came the rocky history with Haiti, which shares the island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic. Haiti’s slaves revolted against the French and in 1804 established their own nation. In 1822, Haitians took over the entire island, ruling the predominantly Hispanic Dominican Republic for 22 years.

To this day, the Dominican Republic celebrates its independence not from centuries-long colonizer Spain, but from Haiti.

The problem is Haitians developed a policy of black-centrism and … Dominicans don’t respond to that,” said scholar Manuel Núñez, who is black. “Dominican is not a color of skin, like the Haitian.”

Dictator Rafael Trujillo, who ruled from 1930 to 1961, strongly promoted anti-Haitian sentiments, and is blamed for creating the many racial categories that avoided the use of the word “black.”

The practice continued under President Joaquín Balaguer, who often complained that Haitians were “darkening” the country. In the 1990s, he was blamed for thwarting the presidential aspirations of leading black candidate José Francisco Peña Gómez by spreading rumors that he was actually Haitian.

Under Trujillo, being black was the worst thing you could be,” said Afro-Dominican poet Blas Jiménez. “Now we are Dominican, because we are not Haitian. We are something, because we are not that.”

Jiménez remembers when he got his first passport, the clerk labeled him “Indian.” He protested to the director of the agency.

I remember the man saying, ‘If he wants to be black, let him be black!’ ” Jiménez said.

Resentment toward anything Haitian continues, as an estimated one million Haitians live in the Dominican Republic, most working in the sugar and construction industries. Mass deportations often mistakenly include black Dominicans, and Haitians have been periodically lynched in mob violence. The government has been trying to deny citizenship and public education to the Dominican-born children of illegal Haitian migrants.

When migrant-rights activist Sonia Pierre won the prestigious Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award in 2006, the government responded by trying to revoke her citizenship, saying she is actually Haitian.

There’s tremendous resistance to blackness — black is something bad,” said black feminist Sergia Galván. ‘‘Black is associated with dark, illegal, ugly, clandestine things. There is a prototype of beauty here and a lot of social pressure. There are schools where braids and natural hair are prohibited.”

Galván and a loosely knit group of women have protested European canons of beauty, once going so far as to rally outside a beauty pageant. She and other experts say it is now more common to see darker-skinned women in the contests — but they never win.

CULTURE PULL

Several women said the cultural rejection of African looking hair is so strong that people often shout insults at
women with natural curls.

I cannot take the bus because people pull my hair and stick combs in it,” said wavy haired performance artist Xiomara Fortuna. “They ask me if I just got out of prison. People just don’t want that image to be seen.”

The hours spent on hair extensions and painful chemical straightening treatments are actually an expression of nationalism, said Ginetta Candelario, who studies the complexities of Dominican race and beauty at Smith College in Massachusetts. And to some of the women who relax their hair, it’s simply a way to have soft manageable hair in the Dominican Republic’s stifling humidity.

It’s not self-hate,” Candelario said. “Going through that is to love yourself a lot. That’s someone saying, ‘I am going to take care of me.’ It’s nationalist, it’s affirmative and celebrating self.”

Money, education, class — and of course straight hair — can make dark-skinned Dominicans be perceived as more “white,” she said. Many black Dominicans here say they never knew they were black — until they visited the United States.

During the Trujillo regime, people who were dark skinned were rejected, so they created their own mechanism to fight it,” said Ramona Hernández, Director of the Dominican Studies Institute at City College in New York. “When you ask, ‘What are you?’ they don’t give you the answer you want … saying we don’t want to deal with our blackness is simply what you want to hear.”

Hernández, who has olive-toned skin and a long mane of hair she blows out straight, acknowledges she would “never, never, never” go to a university meeting with her natural curls.

That’s a woman trying to look cute; I’m a sociologist,” she said.

Asked if a black Dominican woman can be considered beautiful in her country, Hernández leapt to her feet.

You should see how they come in here with their big asses!” she said, shuffling across her office with her arms extended behind her back, simulating an enormous rear-end. “They come in here thinking they are all that, and I think, ‘doesn’t she know she’s not really pretty?’ ”

Maria Elena Polanca is a black woman with the striking good looks. She said most Dominicans look at her with curiosity, as if a black woman being beautiful were something strange.

She spends her days promoting a hair straightener at La Sirena, a Santo Domingo department store that features an astonishing array of hair straightening products.

Look, we have bad hair, bad. Nobody says ‘curly.’ It’s bad,” she said. “You can’t go out like that. People will say, ‘Look at that nest! Someone light a match!’ ”

‘IT WAS HURTFUL’

Purdue University professor Dawn Stinchcomb, who is African American, said that when she came here in 1999 to study African influences in literature, people insulted her in the street.

Waiters refused to serve her. People wouldn’t help Stinchcomb with her research, saying if she wanted to study Africans, she’d have to go to Haiti.

I had people on the streets … yell at me to get out of the sun because I was already black enough,” she said. “It was hurtful.… I was raised in the South and thought I could handle any racial comment. I never before experienced anything like I did in the Dominican Republic.

I don’t have a problem when people who don’t look like me say hurtful things. But when it’s people who look just like me?”
~Miami Herald

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Olivia
Olivia
11 years ago

i’m speechless, that is so crazy, yet so sad.

what would be the action of change here?

thelady
thelady
11 years ago

that whole concept of curly or afro textured hair being “unmanageable” is just as harmful as the good hair bad hair nonsense

I manage my hair just fine thank you very much

yours truly
yours truly
11 years ago

i remember reading this article a couple years ago myself. reading it again, this jumped out at me just as much as the hair hatred factor: “You should see how they come in here with their big asses!” she said, shuffling across her office with her arms extended behind her back, simulating an enormous rear-end. “They come in here thinking they are all that, and I think, ‘doesn’t she know she’s not really pretty?’ ” I thought being shapely was something to be proud of there. :/ It’s what a lot of their women tend to be admired for. But I… Read more »

Nikita
Nikita
11 years ago

So sad. For years, I have been berated because of my “bad hair” and my choice (gasp!) to first wear it natural, and now to wear it in locks. To make it “worse”, I am also dark-skinned… So for most people they consider it as two strikes against me. I just shake it off… I know that me and my hair look damn good and I’m not going to apologize for what grows out of my head naturally!!! As if!!!

? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
11 years ago

W O W . to the millionth power

Chrissae
Chrissae
11 years ago

I am a Haitian American in the DC area. Where do I begin?… I have been to Haiti and the Dominican Republic. I didn’t get any discrimination while there, but while I was on a tour (with other Haitians from the US, the tour guide was describing Haitian immigrants to the Dominican Republic as only being able to live in ghettos and pointed as we drove by. All I could feel was anger and sadness. Didn’t he realize that the awful things he was saying about haitians was towards a tour group consisting of haitians?? This girl I used to… Read more »

Nikki
Nikki
11 years ago

“Many black Dominicans here say they never knew they were black — until they visited the United States.” That is hilarious. I LOVE IT. Clearly more Dominicans need to travel. The bit about Hernandez and her comments about black women with their ‘big asses’ thinking they were pretty — que cosa! — so all dominicans wish to be blond and blue eyed, essentially? And then they say it isn’t self hate? When you see the lack of interest they have in THEIR own (black) history I say don’t fight it. Leave them be. Because as the global community shrinks and… Read more »

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I too remember reading this article years ago and it continues to frustrate me. An overwhelming number of Dominicans hold these values to the heart, but not all. I remember arguing with a distant cousin about our family being of African descent and she swore up and down that true Dominicans consist of Taíno (Amerindian), and Spaniard; nothing else. A lot of the racism and self hate that Dominicans experience drive deep into the history of our country. Trujillo was an awful dictator who I would place 85% of the blame upon for propagating self hatred. After his dictatorship ended… Read more »

aulelia
aulelia
11 years ago

WOW…

Very scary stuff to read.

I’m an African girl and I have so much love for our Caribbean brothers and sisters, but this is creepy to read.

I hope these issues get sorted out when people decide to have more children, they can teach them good values of respecting all types of hair.

jenteel
jenteel
11 years ago

people need to be aware of this issue. i take issue when anyone of african ancestry denies their heritage and usually it’s someone who looks just like me. it’s one of the reasons why i don’t call anyone of latino heritage “spanish”. it’s just one more way to separate from blackness. it all boils down to self-hate. i am soooo happy i was raised by proud haitian parents who taught me to love my wonderful culture and all the languages we speak. now i’m not saying that haitians don’t have hair and color issues. growing up, i was told i… Read more »

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I love your comments. You speak nothing but the truth. Another book that might be of interest is The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat.

*sorry if this shows up more than once, I kept receiving an error notice.

LuvDeluxe
LuvDeluxe
11 years ago

Wow Nikki… They sure will have culture shock. Well I can’t deny that my Gram was Siminole because if I did my nose would give it away. The only thing about my heritage that halfway embarrassed me was knowing that Massa’ actually did rape one of my Great Grams that is why there are two spellings of the name Fluellen (Flewellen) and that cousin somebody would be my exact clone except she is ten shades lighter. Time and awareness usually heals this pain but if even one seed is still deseased, negative ideas can creep back up like the plague.… Read more »

Queenbuv3
Queenbuv3
11 years ago

This article makes me sick to my stomach. It just floors me that these women are subjected to so much hate and pressure to go against what God gave them. The attitudes in this article are just disguting and frightening.

God doesn’t make mistakes. He made us all the way we look for a reason. 

For what it is worth, curly and kinky hair rocks!!! Black women are beautiful just the way God made them : )

This article has brought tears to my eyes. I’m really upset by the hateful oppressive attitudes in this article. I’m really sad now : (

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

Wow…wow…wow!!! What is it about being black that people want to avoid it like the plague? I guess black is only beautiful if you have long straight hair..oh and let’s not forget…a good skin bleaching cream…

Black girl with long hair
Black girl with long hair
11 years ago

An inappropriate comment was recently published. This was a total and honest mistake and I apologize to everyone who saw it and took offense.

Jai
Jai
11 years ago

I read this article before and reading it again is just as upsetting. 

I think its sad that the dominicans continue to spread this self hate to their children generation after generation. 

Why did Zoe Saldana come to mind after reading this article again? Does she claim NOT to be black too? May God help them all for denying how He made them!

@ Nikki, you’ve got me screaming lol. OMG, why did Dave Chappelle’skit come to mind?(Clayton Bigsby) 

@ jenteel, thanks for the info I’m always learning something from this blog 🙂

@ Leila, welcome back from vacay!!!

?reciä
?reciä
11 years ago

I’ve read about the same situation a while back and of course i was in shock. Here in the north our excuse is unacceptable while over there its a whole other ball game. Not saying its acceptable but one can’t win there.. as it is still going through the “development stages” You Know building a strong foundation for the country.  As Black people we need to understand how much stronger and powerful we would be as a whole supporting one another and accepting who we are… We need to take back control of our rights… our ancestors worked hard for… Read more »

Ms. Crown of Hair
Ms. Crown of Hair
11 years ago

You stole the words right out of my mouth, Jenteel! 

It’s fascinating to me how some Dominicans (and people originating from other Latino countries) still believe that they are direct descendants of Tainos and Spaniards and that they don’t have a drop of black blood even though their skin is a chocolate shade w/ kinky hair. I just feel sorry for people who are stuck in that mentality because they are losing their heritage and pressuring beautiful young girls into believing their crap!

Adriel
Adriel
11 years ago

That makes me want to go to the Dominican Republic and DO SOMETHING just anything so that these people know how lovely they are and that we are all creatures of God, equal and the same no matter how we look.

Black girl with long hair
Black girl with long hair
11 years ago

@ Olivia… you ask an excellent question. Hopefully with continued discussion we can learn what to do.

LivingGolden
LivingGolden
11 years ago

@nikki, it is not unfathomable that many black Dominicans didn’t think of themselves as black until coming to the US. If you’re brought up in a culture that defines you as anything other than black and you’re taught from a very young age that black is the worst thing a person can be, it would be hard not to develop the mindset that many black or mixed-race Dominicans have. To give Dominicans credit, in the past few years, more black Dominican women (in the US) are pushing for acceptance of their natrual hair. It is not an easy process. Imagine… Read more »

thelady
thelady
11 years ago

Zoe Saldana refers to herself as Black, the Dominican Media is not to happy with her about that.

Lili
Lili
11 years ago

I vacationed in the DR with my hubby and daughter — we are all varying shades of brown; my hubby is dark chocolate. We were at a resort near Puerto Plata. I recall many dark skinned Dominicans shouting stuff to my husband like “you are my brother ‘cos you have my skin colour” or “we darker skin people have no money and must stick together”. People would automatically assume we had little money because of our colour; at our hotel the (light-skinned- more on this, see below) maids/waiters etc would stare at us in wonder as if it was a… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

@Lili, no coincidence. In places like DR, Brazil, Peru, for example, dark-skin and curly hair can make it incredibly difficult to get quality employment. In Peru, shop/restaurant owners are blatantly open about the fact that they will not hire people of darker skin. It’s slowly changing, but still a fact of life nonetheless.…

Black girl with long hair
Black girl with long hair
11 years ago

could somebody explain more about trujillo and the effect he had on the dominican republic?

LivingGolden
LivingGolden
11 years ago

I’ll see if I can find any good online references, but here’s look up the Parsley Massacre to get an idea of who Trujillo was. (Trujillo, determined to expand his influence over all of Hispaniola, in October 1937 ordered the indiscriminate butchery by the Dominican army of an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 Haitians on the Dominican side of the Massacre River. The Parsley Massacre occured in October 1937 on the Dominican Haitian border. Between 17,000 and 35,000 Haitians living in the DR were killed byDominican civilians and military officials. The reasons for the massacres was a supposed responseto the theft… Read more »

Gabrielle313
Gabrielle313
11 years ago

What I find amazing is how the irony of all this is present in my life. My grandmother (considered in the States extremely fai-skinned)is Dominican born and moved to the States, had my mother who was teased in the South about being light so much she married and had children with the darkest man she could find here in the States- my Daddy ;0) Later it was me visiting Dominican salons here that I was told my hair was “Not that bad”- her exact words and I could get away with just blowing my hair out, not relaxing it. Ironically… Read more »

serenissima
serenissima
11 years ago

Whoa boy… This is a loaded topic for me. I have a lot of Dominican friends and a Dominican girlfriend, and race has definitely played a major part in these relationships. A lot of my girlfriends friends, who are Spanish, dislike me because I’m Black and not light skinned (even though I’m partially redeemed by my ‘good’ hair smh).  My gf and I also had a major breakup over race, and some nasty opinions she used to have about Black girls, which culminated in her telling me I wasn’t ‘really’ Black. Needless to say, I set her straight! And I feel… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

*Sigh*
Bglh are you aware Dr. Hernandez published a rebuttal to this insisting she was severly misquoted in this slanted article?
I am familiar with Dr. Hernandez and her work supports her assertion. She has tried unsuccessfully for years to bury this distorted article and those quotes attributed to her. I would encourage you all to look deeper before breaking out the pitchforks.
In fairness, I think the rebuttal should also be posted. This article is really villifying.

Black girl with long hair
Black girl with long hair
11 years ago

@ anonymous 7:28 p.m. … no. i wasn’t aware of that. i will publish it if i find it. do you know a link?

Shandra E...*the misses
Shandra E...*the misses
11 years ago

wow.…I’m reminded of a girl i grew up with; her last name was Martinez & her first name was something “spanish” as well! However, before she opened her mouth & before anyone knew her name.…every black girl in the class assumed she was a foriegn African girl who didn’t speak English! We had a few things right: she was “foriegn”, she didn’t speak English.…but once she learned how…She made sure we all knew SHE WAS NOT BLACK, instead she was “LATINA”?? MAN were we so lost!!! She’s actually a Belizian who looks mOre “AFRICAN” american than most black girls i… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

You know…i had a lot of dominicans friends and quite a few family members by marriage that are dominican. I myself am haitian. When I read how they treat haitians and how much self hatred that they have it makes me sick to my stomach,  @ LIVING Golden…You would be surprised many of us are well informed on DR and President Trujillo OR THE “Parsley Massacre“and are still sickend by the Dominican mentality. I am not giving a sympathy pass I will leave that to you. I went to a Dominican’s friends home and he was a male. His mother… Read more »

jenteel
jenteel
11 years ago

@ anonymous — July 13, 2009 7:28 p.m: i appreciate your respect for journalistic standards, but the article was simply posted as is. this is a natural hair blog that often ties in natural hair to culture. even if ms. hernandez’s quotes were edited out (which would not have been acceptable to do), the article would have still been inflammatory to a majority of BGLH readers. honestly, these sentiments are not so foreign in the dominican republic. many have also commented on their personal experiences.  in regards to ethnic groups/nationalities discussed on this blog, we discussed some of these same… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

@Shandra E…, in many countries, including many in the Caribbean where I was born and raised, black is not simply defined by color. In the US, a person with any black ancestry is black because black folk in this country insist on sticking with one-drop makes you black. We like to blame that on white folk, but we’re the ones insisting on carryng that idea forward. Black folk in the US also like to dictate how the rest of the world is supposed to view blackness. In the Caribbean, there is a term “doogla” or “dougla” depending on the country.… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

Rebuttal link;This was also mentioned on afrobella:http://clutchmagonline.com/newsgossipinfo/black-denial-response-did-the-miami-herald-have-an-agenda/ Jenteel,It’s not about challending journalistic integrity (I don’t have much faith in that anyway lol) BUT when you publish an article with direct quotes that portrays a woman of color, an educator, a Dominicana as essentially a racist that’s serious. This article is OLD, and when I read it long ago I was out raged. It was incredibly easy to find, correspond with, and speak with Dr. Hernandez concerning it. I wont post our personal correspondence, but her scholarly publication record and my interactions with her are in complete opposition to how she… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

Guys, there are tons or articles, videos etc on the web about the blossoming civil rights movement throughout Latin America. This article was just one point of view. Check some of those out and let’s move on.

Black girl with long hair
Black girl with long hair
11 years ago

@ anonymous 9:43 and 10:06 … If either one of you could do a guest post about the growing civil rights movement in the Dominican Republic, I would love it! Or if you could direct me to any articles about it. As long as they mention/address the issue of hair, it would be a great fit for the blog. As J said, the aim is not to villify but to educate. This article was sent to me by a BGLH reader who followed our discussion on natural hair in Nigeria, and felt this was somewhat related.  It seems other people have read… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

@BGLH, to begin with, there are other articles in the same link for the article you posted (e.g. http://www.miamiherald.com/multimedia/news/afrolatin/part1/index.html) that talk about other aspects of the struggle. One thing I think a lot of people outside of Latin America don’t understand is the fact that Latin American governments for a very long time (and only now slowly changing) wouldn’t even acknowledge the black population. Imagine living in a country where your race isn’t even acknowledged, much less counted in the cencus, by your own goverment. I’ve read a lot of articles on this subject, most at least 2 years old.… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

For anyone who is interested, here are a few articles/videos I enjoyed. Even the older ones are still relevant today as not much has changed in Latin America. - http://www.pbs.org/wnet/wideangle/episodes/brazil-in-black-and-white/introduction/965/ - http://www.livinginperu.com/news/8007 (Peru by the way is considered to be one of the worst when it comes to discrimination towards blacks. Also check out http://www.nytimes.com/1996/08/17/world/for-blacks-in-peru-there-s-no-room-at-the-top.html. It’s very old, but well-written. I’ve found it difficult to find updated information on Peru, so if anyone else can recommend books/articles, that would be great.) - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBNUOsrIiAs (If you watch this, you can find other links to other stories about racism in Latin America) -… Read more »

Black girl with long hair
Black girl with long hair
11 years ago

@ Anonymous… thanks for the links. I’ll look through them and see if anything is appropriate to post.

This blog is about hair, and I think it’s one of the reasons the article above is really unique and fits well with BGLH.

If any of the information/links you’ve provided touch on the issue of hair as it relates to civil rights/liberation, then I’ll be sure to put it up. 

Thanks for sending them!

His Daughter
His Daughter
11 years ago

i can’t help it, this kind of hate, ignorance, and self-loathing just makes me cry. God made us each to be different, everything in this world is diverse, y can’t we accept each other, and love each other?

serenissima
serenissima
11 years ago

At anonymous 10:35 That was the US throughout history and up to 50 years ago, in the discrimination against Blacks. The ignorance was not ignored or pardoned; it was picketed and protested until changes were made. But as far as I can tell, Dominicans are the ones embracing and perpetuating the cycle. It’s not just this one article, which so many commenters seem to want to vilify. It’s every day. My girlfriend, who was raised in DR, totally agreed when I showed her this article. She recalled memories of working in her fathers store, in Washington Heights, NY, where 60 % of… Read more »

serenissima
serenissima
11 years ago

And one more thing: the bleach blonde, perked and blown out Dominican is so prevalent in New York City there’s even a name for them: Pharmacy Blondes (the actual saying is in Spanish, but i can’t think of how it goes)

Amber
Amber
11 years ago

you see sh*t like this makes me want to raise hell, it erupts some type of anger inside of me. this isn’t with just dominicans though, my dad’s mother is venezuelan (which is also a spanish country) and they are quite racist as well. Therefore I choose not to identify with them plain and simple ! Nor do I go to dominican salons because I remember going there 2 years ago and they dissed my natural hair saying i needed a perm. Now I was in hs and didnt know any better so I let them do it and bam… Read more »

serenissima
serenissima
11 years ago

Sorry guys… Where it says ‘perked’ in my comment, it’s supposed to say ‘permed’

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

Why is sharing your feeling on the matter a negative thing! We are suppose to negate the fact that this is happening. No I am not bashing Dominican (like they bash me) but why cant we get together and discuss issues like this. I think dialogue is powerful and healing. You will get some bashers but thats how they feel. I commend BGLH for always talking about political issues. We also discuss the natural hair in Nigeria and how its viewed negatively. Why are we aloud to share how we feel about what going on in DR. You really think… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

@ serenissima

YES, they post hate messages about blacks and hatians in their papers and even all over youtube so to this sister saying stop bashing Dominican and no blacks in the world want to claim black… they are bashing black folks all over the internet. So you should leave that same comment on yoou tube.

Love this blog! great topic!

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

I am loving this post and I find this issue to be a very serious and disturbing matter. I am happy for sites like this one that people from other countries can access and see the positive images of black women with natural hair. I know that this may be off topic but living in Miami I encounter a lot of different cultures and I find that not only dominicans have a seperatist (sp)attitude but so do the haitians. I hang with a lot of haitian people and they tend to seperate themselves from “american blacks” (even though many of… Read more »

The Fashionstar
The Fashionstar
11 years ago

I’d never heard about the Dominican blow-outs until I began reading another hair blog for about 2 or 3 yrs. And the writer would always talk about how she gets a Dominican blow-out between touch-ups because they do a good job at straightening. I now see why they do such a great job. I know in America we still have a lot of hair issues but these people in this article are having a full-on identity crisis. I think it’s a damn shame, but it shows how damaging the whole institution of slavery has been on so many levels.  It’s… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

@anon, the distance between American blacks and blacks from other parts of the diaspora is disturbing and goes both ways. I’ve been in rooms and listened as American blacks went on and on about “those foreigners” even though they knew I was one of “those foreigners.” When they’d remember, they’s say “Oh, I don’t mean you of course.” There seems to be a lot of mistrust and misunderstanding between various groups. I too would like to see it go away.

G
G
11 years ago

This is so sad but true. And as far as denying your race. Something that always stands out in my mind is the Black Dominican man that I used to work with who stated “I could tell anyone that I’m Black and they’d believe me. But I’m not Black. I’m Dominican. *blank stare*

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

Honestly I get it…I’m Black…to me, if I say that, that means that I’m an American, and basically all I know about my history and my heritage is that my skin is dark and that I KNOW I’m not white…if Dominicans who have dark skin want to clarify them being Dominican versus black, I understand…they know their history, ancestry, and really have a totally different culture and upbringing than those of the same skin color who were born, raised and grew up in America..think about it. No one says anything to our Caucasian friends who say they are German or… Read more »

Izzy
Izzy
11 years ago

RACE/ETHNICITY=Black (of African descent)NATIONALITY=Dominican. I don’t see the two being interchangeable. Just because someone chooses to self-identify with one doesn’t mean they are not the other, but seeing how most blacks are treated, portrayed, and/or the quality of life afforded to many, can ya blame someone for seeing an opportunity to disassociate and then jumping on it? Would I do so? God, I hope not, but apparently it isn’t a question of pride for those that do–it’s survival. The whole system is SEVERELY screwed up. This is a useful discussion, but we need to address the underlying problem. Who’s brave… Read more »

Wildfiyah
Wildfiyah
11 years ago

funnily enough, i’m spending my summer working on the haiti vs. dominican republic case before the inter-american human rights court. solange pierre is one of the plaintiffs/victims. the situation in the d.r. is deep…and it all goes back to self-hatred and racism…

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

The issues within the black diaspora will not go away easily as long as we continue to argue and bicker amongst ourselves. Responding in anger to a person who is lost in terms of identity will never bring that person over to your point of view and painting an entire community with one brush without taking time to get to know each person one on one to get an understanding of their story will never bring about unity. Thank you poster. That “they bash us lets bash them mentality” is pointless and counter productive. It is part of the reason that… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

@ anonymous July 21, 2009 9:05 PM
Get it together? For responding and sharing our thoughts on something that is happening beyond the article. I hear it when I USED TO get a blow out. This article did not tell me something new…go on youtube..speak to a dominican and tell them to get it together and let us converse and share our thoughts without being told to get it together!!!!!!

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

Anonymous 7/22 1:13 wrong context. Get it together as in show some solidarity as people of color.. You can express any thoughts you want as can I. I surely won’t be basing my opinions and experiences of Dominicans on racist youtube comments nor should anyone. I have known many people from DR, Brazil, Ecuador. etc and they are as varied in their opinions and issues with colorism and hairism as African Americans. I used to get my hair pressed by an old lady from the South and the comments were just as rank and foul so what is the problem… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

@ Anonymous July 23, 2009 10:11 AM: Thank you very much for your post, and I agree with you wholeheartedly. As a Dominican young woman, I have to say that I am not comfortable with the direction this conversation is taking. I take offense to the general accusations being made here. Is there racism in the Dominican Republic? Yes. Is there a hair issue? Yes. Do we all think the same? Absolutely not. I can also say that I’ve been discriminated against by black (non-latino) people–more so than by white people. In addition, I didn’t know any other black woman with… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

@ serenissima:“And one more thing: the bleach blonde, perked and blown out Dominican is so prevalent in New York City there’s even a name for them: Pharmacy Blondes (the actual saying is in Spanish, but i can’t think of how it goes)” Just to clarify–The term is “mujer de farmacia”, and it is used to describe ANY WOMAN that’s fake–whether it’s fake hair, fake nails, fake hair color (that you could buy at a pharmacy). It’s not just used to describe Dominican women who do it. It was a term made popular in a merengue in the ’90’s…I forget who sings… Read more »

serenissima
serenissima
11 years ago

All of my comments are based on my opinion, thanks… I’m just going to leave it at that

serenissima
serenissima
11 years ago

Pharmacy BLONDES where I live are also pharmacy BLONDES… Not pharmacy fakes. In the context it’s used in my neighborhood and between the Dominicans I know, it means permed and bleach blonde- not simply fake. But yet
again, that’s my experience. While, of course, I appreciate the opinions and points of others, and don’t presume to assume that ALL Dominicans are the same, none of your comments can change my experience in DR or my day to day in New York City, which is what I shared in my comments.

Chaz_Turner
Chaz_Turner
11 years ago

Wow.. this hits home. I am Haitian american & I grew up in South FL. I remember going to school with a few dominican kids.. I remember one occasion, I was about 13 yrs old & they were probably around the same age. Anyway, we were on the bus and the bus driver called out to this dominican kid and said “Hey black boy” or something like that to get his attn. This kid got sooo angry. I remember him walking home and talking about how he’s NOT black. And this kid was Morris Chestnut’s skin complexion. I was confused… Read more »

Tabatha
Tabatha
6 years ago
Reply to  Chaz_Turner

You know what? Over time if you are dark it meant that you were meant for field work if you were fair skin then you were meant for luxury because such pure skin can not handle a long time in the sun. A lot of the time that was what people looked at when they would get promotions or married off. My friend is Cambodian and her and her husband are light in color, so they assumed all their kids should be that way which would secure their status money wise and the kudos I guess with in their culture.… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
11 years ago

Honestly, it’s somewhat true. But that’s an exaggeration. Big butts, are not an issue. As a girl lacking one despite the whole Dominican big butt genetic I will tell you from experience it isn’t a problem. Dominican men love butts. I think the issue lies with Dominican women having some of the curvies frames in Hispanic America, being downgraded with those killer Haitian curves. I’ve had guys ask me why I don’t have the kind of butt you can put a glass on. I just answer, bad luck. ;3 Also, in the Dominican Republic, curly hair is not bad, at… Read more »

Tabatha
Tabatha
6 years ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Very interesting view. I appreciate it. My friend was raised in the DR until she was a preteen I think and then they moved to Miami. People asked her what her ethnicity and she said it with pride, “I’m Dominican”. She was very sweet and always kept me laughing and she told me it depended sometimes which areas you were in. You know? well I loved her curly hair and she said that she never had an issue with it. But when our ship moored in Perth she decided to get it blow dried and straightened. She liked it because… Read more »

highcoil
highcoil
11 years ago

It’s time every descendant of an African to take responsibility for their view of their natural beauty and their education as to how to manage it. We all came from some blue-black people, kinky-haired people, right down to our first mother on earth.  And, now that WE’RE FREE to do so, it’s our job to be acquainted with what works for us to bring out our natural beauty. If you want a real change, then, don’t just look at the sad part. I like this blog because it does more than air dirty laundry, it cleans up too.  Keep showing and revealing to… Read more »

Tabatha
Tabatha
6 years ago
Reply to  highcoil

Being curvy was popular waaaaaaay down in time. It was a sign that you were healthy and would give birth to many children then all of a sudden Maybe it was the flapper era, not sure don’t quote me on it cause I don’t know, but it was sexy to be thin and have a boyish figure. Now its a mix of both. You can teach people that and show people our beauty, but we have to make sure that we aren’t trying to shove it down peoples throats. But I do have to say we have to stop gaining… Read more »

Clarissa Evans
Clarissa Evans
6 years ago
Reply to  Tabatha

“make sure we aren’t trying to shove it down people’s throats”?? You mean like the way the european standard of beauty is shoved down all our throats everyday and has been for centuries? It’s sad that black people think we can be proud, but not TOO proud of who we are, and where we came from. We constantly apologize for being different or try to cover up our uniqueness with quick fixes to better blend in to the colorless mold of society. The minute someone of color is confident in who they are and stops trying to live up to… Read more »

Clarissa Evans
Clarissa Evans
6 years ago
Reply to  Tabatha

Make sure we aren’t trying to shove it down people’s throats?? You mean like the way the european standard of beauty is shoved down all our throats everyday and has been for centuries? It’s sad that black people think we can be proud, but not TOO proud of who we are, and where we came from. We constantly apologize for being different or try to cover up our uniqueness with quick fixes to better blend in to the colorless mold of society. The minute someone of color is confident in who they are and stops trying to live up to… Read more »

Deb
Deb
11 years ago

Hello … I just discovered this blog and though I intend to read everything written about Dominicans’ rejection of blackness, I felt compelled to comment now. I am a black American woman, with natural hair that I’ve worked three years to achieve. I am very proud to say my hair is 100 percent natural. I wear it braided, and for added length I use braiding hair that has a natural-hair texture. The reason I’m here is to research gender roles in Dominican relationships, which sounds pretty basic. Nevertheless, I’m finding so many interesting dynamics I never dreamed would come into play.… Read more »

IDGAF
IDGAF
5 years ago
Reply to  Deb

africa is a part of our culture … and they do hair very well .. so what… here yall relax thre they blow dry.… i stop ppl if they are wildin on my hair .. yaljust want us to say we are african ONLY

Yirssi B.
Yirssi B.
11 years ago

This is interesting. I am Dominican, and am now considering going natural. NOBODY understands why it’s such a big deal for me to do this. Since African American women have at least some history and acceptance of going natural, nobody understands why for me, as a Dominican, it’s actually the scariest decission I’ve every made in my life. I talked a bit about it in my blog post:
http://www.breakingtheglassceilings.com/2009/09/good-hair.html

? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
11 years ago

W O W . to the millionth power

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I too remember reading this article years ago and it continues to frustrate me. An overwhelming number of Dominicans hold these values to the heart, but not all. I remember arguing with a distant cousin about our family being of African descent and she swore up and down that true Dominicans consist of Taíno (Amerindian), and Spaniard; nothing else. A lot of the racism and self hate that Dominicans experience drive deep into the history of our country. Trujillo was an awful dictator who I would place 85% of the blame upon for propagating self hatred. After his dictatorship ended… Read more »

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I love your comments. You speak nothing but the truth. Another book that might be of interest is The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat.

*sorry if this shows up more than once, I kept receiving an error notice.

?reciä
?reciä
11 years ago

I’ve read about the same situation a while back and of course i was in shock. Here in the north our excuse is unacceptable while over there its a whole other ball game. Not saying its acceptable but one can’t win there.. as it is still going through the “development stages” You Know building a strong foundation for the country.  As Black people we need to understand how much stronger and powerful we would be as a whole supporting one another and accepting who we are… We need to take back control of our rights… our ancestors worked hard for… Read more »

? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
11 years ago

W O W . to the millionth power

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I too remember reading this article years ago and it continues to frustrate me. An overwhelming number of Dominicans hold these values to the heart, but not all. I remember arguing with a distant cousin about our family being of African descent and she swore up and down that true Dominicans consist of Taíno (Amerindian), and Spaniard; nothing else. A lot of the racism and self hate that Dominicans experience drive deep into the history of our country. Trujillo was an awful dictator who I would place 85% of the blame upon for propagating self hatred. After his dictatorship ended… Read more »

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I love your comments. You speak nothing but the truth. Another book that might be of interest is The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat.

*sorry if this shows up more than once, I kept receiving an error notice.

?reciä
?reciä
11 years ago

I’ve read about the same situation a while back and of course i was in shock. Here in the north our excuse is unacceptable while over there its a whole other ball game. Not saying its acceptable but one can’t win there.. as it is still going through the “development stages” You Know building a strong foundation for the country.  As Black people we need to understand how much stronger and powerful we would be as a whole supporting one another and accepting who we are… We need to take back control of our rights… our ancestors worked hard for… Read more »

? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
11 years ago

W O W . to the millionth power

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I too remember reading this article years ago and it continues to frustrate me. An overwhelming number of Dominicans hold these values to the heart, but not all. I remember arguing with a distant cousin about our family being of African descent and she swore up and down that true Dominicans consist of Taíno (Amerindian), and Spaniard; nothing else. A lot of the racism and self hate that Dominicans experience drive deep into the history of our country. Trujillo was an awful dictator who I would place 85% of the blame upon for propagating self hatred. After his dictatorship ended… Read more »

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I love your comments. You speak nothing but the truth. Another book that might be of interest is The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat.

*sorry if this shows up more than once, I kept receiving an error notice.

?reciä
?reciä
11 years ago

I’ve read about the same situation a while back and of course i was in shock. Here in the north our excuse is unacceptable while over there its a whole other ball game. Not saying its acceptable but one can’t win there.. as it is still going through the “development stages” You Know building a strong foundation for the country.  As Black people we need to understand how much stronger and powerful we would be as a whole supporting one another and accepting who we are… We need to take back control of our rights… our ancestors worked hard for… Read more »

? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
11 years ago

W O W . to the millionth power

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I too remember reading this article years ago and it continues to frustrate me. An overwhelming number of Dominicans hold these values to the heart, but not all. I remember arguing with a distant cousin about our family being of African descent and she swore up and down that true Dominicans consist of Taíno (Amerindian), and Spaniard; nothing else. A lot of the racism and self hate that Dominicans experience drive deep into the history of our country. Trujillo was an awful dictator who I would place 85% of the blame upon for propagating self hatred. After his dictatorship ended… Read more »

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I love your comments. You speak nothing but the truth. Another book that might be of interest is The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat.

*sorry if this shows up more than once, I kept receiving an error notice.

?reciä
?reciä
11 years ago

I’ve read about the same situation a while back and of course i was in shock. Here in the north our excuse is unacceptable while over there its a whole other ball game. Not saying its acceptable but one can’t win there.. as it is still going through the “development stages” You Know building a strong foundation for the country.  As Black people we need to understand how much stronger and powerful we would be as a whole supporting one another and accepting who we are… We need to take back control of our rights… our ancestors worked hard for… Read more »

snowbird21
snowbird21
11 years ago

Currently I am living in the DR and in the process of going natural. It is DIFFICULT as an African-American women. Everyone looks at my skin color and assume I am Haitian — which is not an offense considering the beauty of Haitian people and the Kreyol language — however, when they hear me speaking English without an accent they are confused. Many do not believe me when i tell them I am from the states…It is HARD fro darker skinned Dominicans to realize that they ARE Black — And the hardest part is seeing them not only hate to… Read more »

Tabatha
Tabatha
6 years ago
Reply to  snowbird21

A lot of them do. Please go and talk to some of them. My friend tried it to be different she would never do it again. she loves her hair.

? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
11 years ago

W O W . to the millionth power

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I too remember reading this article years ago and it continues to frustrate me. An overwhelming number of Dominicans hold these values to the heart, but not all. I remember arguing with a distant cousin about our family being of African descent and she swore up and down that true Dominicans consist of Taíno (Amerindian), and Spaniard; nothing else. A lot of the racism and self hate that Dominicans experience drive deep into the history of our country. Trujillo was an awful dictator who I would place 85% of the blame upon for propagating self hatred. After his dictatorship ended… Read more »

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I love your comments. You speak nothing but the truth. Another book that might be of interest is The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat.

*sorry if this shows up more than once, I kept receiving an error notice.

?reciä
?reciä
11 years ago

I’ve read about the same situation a while back and of course i was in shock. Here in the north our excuse is unacceptable while over there its a whole other ball game. Not saying its acceptable but one can’t win there.. as it is still going through the “development stages” You Know building a strong foundation for the country.  As Black people we need to understand how much stronger and powerful we would be as a whole supporting one another and accepting who we are… We need to take back control of our rights… our ancestors worked hard for… Read more »

? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
? ? [m a r i . b e e]. ?
11 years ago

W O W . to the millionth power

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I too remember reading this article years ago and it continues to frustrate me. An overwhelming number of Dominicans hold these values to the heart, but not all. I remember arguing with a distant cousin about our family being of African descent and she swore up and down that true Dominicans consist of Taíno (Amerindian), and Spaniard; nothing else. A lot of the racism and self hate that Dominicans experience drive deep into the history of our country. Trujillo was an awful dictator who I would place 85% of the blame upon for propagating self hatred. After his dictatorship ended… Read more »

Fly Vixen [?]
Fly Vixen [?]
11 years ago

I love your comments. You speak nothing but the truth. Another book that might be of interest is The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat.

*sorry if this shows up more than once, I kept receiving an error notice.

?reciä
?reciä
11 years ago

I’ve read about the same situation a while back and of course i was in shock. Here in the north our excuse is unacceptable while over there its a whole other ball game. Not saying its acceptable but one can’t win there.. as it is still going through the “development stages” You Know building a strong foundation for the country.  As Black people we need to understand how much stronger and powerful we would be as a whole supporting one another and accepting who we are… We need to take back control of our rights… our ancestors worked hard for… Read more »

MORENIQUA
MORENIQUA
11 years ago

“Also, in the Dominican Republic, curly hair is not bad, at all. Especially not in the dominican republic. It’s seen as something usually beautiful. People always speculate on how gorgeous mine is, and I have EXTREMELY curly hair. So curly it never goes past shoulder length despite it reaching midback when pulled down.… Dominican Republic with me, I come from a small town called Santiago. People couldn’t help but if she’s mixed due to her hair. As if black girls couldn’t have well managed long hair. The answer is simple shea butter and knots giving her a curly look.” YOU“RE… Read more »

Tabatha
Tabatha
6 years ago
Reply to  MORENIQUA

Well clearly her experience is different then yours. Sorry you went through that.

IDGAF
IDGAF
5 years ago
Reply to  MORENIQUA

youre a bold faced rican liar.. yall hate us for being darker skinned .. and tainos were in the DR way more than pr, AND GREEETED COLUMBUS TO THEIR DETRIMENT.. YOU act as if calling us black is an insult.. it shows your racism..and Haiti is named after their name for the area.Ayti.. dummy..PR tainos according to SPAIN royal archives died off due to disease and mixed with wwhites and blacks creating PR ppl so u black also.. adn to me that is not an insult its a blessing you low life …YOU yall wish u were taino and italian… Read more »

MissyD
MissyD
11 years ago

One of my best friends is a Dominican American. I realized how much self hate was in the Dominican community when he told me that his brother used a relaxer to get rid of his curls. Now when a DUDE goes so far to use a relaxer to make himself look less African, there is a problem. I don’t think that my friend and his wife are as color struck because at their wedding it was a rainbow of people there and I know that although he’s only dated Dominican females he has messed with all sorts of girls. So… Read more »

IDGAF
IDGAF
5 years ago
Reply to  MissyD

REALLY SO WHEN YALL USE THE DOO RAG AND TEXTURIZER TO LOOSEN NAPS AND GET WAVES IT IS SELF HATE?

Burton
10 years ago

Van Gogh said it best with “Instead of trying to reproduce exactly what I see before me, I make more arbitrary use of color to express myself more forcefully.”

name
9 years ago

Sweet — happy new year!

Chau Alsdon
9 years ago

After exploring through the world wide web and meeting techniques that were not pleasant, I thought my entire life was done.

Treacle
Treacle
6 years ago

…and some clueless people still hold that there’s no ‘race problem’ as such to answer; that slavery has ended and black people should just stop mentioning any existence of far-reaching after-effects, psychological damage or present-day legacy of lies still in existence today? (!)

The evidence speaks for itself and no amount of head-in-the-sand reasoning by misled individuals trying to play the issue down is going to cut it for me or any other person who has experienced the reality of deep-seated prejudice, racism and it’s insidious effects.

Tabatha
Tabatha
6 years ago

Racism is not going any where. Ad it s a liv an thriving I every color and ethnicity. Just look at how people are boycotting Cheerios and Coca Cola. So Sad.

timetravelr
timetravelr
6 years ago

I agree with the article. DR don’t normally embrace curly hair but if you compare black women to Asian or East Indian women, we black women are likely to embrace having darker skin and curly hair more than our Asian and East Indian sisters. I have been to China and Japan as well as Thailand and if you think ONLY black people obsess over looking “Westernized” or white, you would be sadly mistaken. Not only do Asians and East Indians obsess over looking white, they are getting MAJOR surgeries to have lighter or whiter skin, breaking their natural rounder faces… Read more »

Khala
Khala
6 years ago
Reply to  timetravelr

Omg I accidentally “thumbs downed” I meant to like it! I really liked your thoughts because you are right–color ism is everywhere, and it’s not even as bad as we tend to think it is in black-American culture

Coco
Coco
6 years ago
Reply to  Khala

That’s strange. My grandmothers husband is from Japan and I visit Asia often and never encountered that. I think you’re full of shit sorry.

Lisa
Lisa
6 years ago
Reply to  Coco

I think it’s just over-exaggeration, just like with he white women and hair extensions and plastic surgery thing. I guess it makes insecure black women feel better about their delusions. The truth is the VAST MAJORITY of white women do not partake in these activities. Infact only 2 million in the united states have breast implants (most women get them after they have had kids in their older years) and white women are underrepresented in plastic surgeries compared to other groups.

Lisa
Lisa
6 years ago
Reply to  Lisa

That’s 2 million women total in the united states out of 150 million***

Guest
Guest
5 years ago
Reply to  Lisa

white women are underrepresented in plastic surgeries compared to other groups.”–Umm…I know I’m late to this thread, but that statement is completely false.

Yes, not all white women are getting plastic surgery and other ethnic groups numbers have risen, but still, the vast majority of women (steady 70%) that have plastic surgery in the US are white. So that statement is complete lie.

La Bella Bre'
La Bella Bre'
5 years ago
Reply to  Coco

You might want to go Google the Indian skin whitening industry and look and see that it is popular in Thailand and Japan as well. Look up the Black Chinese…the Huns, The Jomon people, the Mongols, the Zhou. You might want to look up on some history and stop using a single example of one person in your family as if it is the law and don’t come off as ignorant telling people they are full of shit when you are not well-versed on this subject, apparently.

La Bella Bre'
La Bella Bre'
5 years ago
Reply to  timetravelr

I agree, I have noted this amongst Asians and East Indians as well. Odd, because the Dravidians are the original people of the Indian subcontinent, and the Jomon people are as dark as your typical African or Black person. The Huns were also dark. When we look at history, all people had melanin to begin with. So this desire of white skin and straight hair comes from oppression and brainwashing. Similar to how white Australians persecute Aborigines.

Curlture
Curlture
6 years ago

This article is very well written and is highly accurate. Dominicans need to acknowledge both sides of their heritage.

IDGAF
IDGAF
5 years ago
Reply to  Curlture

we do YOU WANT US TO ONE DROP… WE SAY MIXED U SAY BLACK…

Lauren
Lauren
6 years ago

Wish I saw this article earlier. I went to the Dominican Republic in January and I have a tapered fro. I received some really dirty stares from mostly women (an older lady tried to spit on me); the men seemed intrigued and some went as far as to cat call at me. It’s really unfortunate as a woman to see so much anger and negativity from other women that look like my own family. It has only inspired me to be more comfortable and confident in the way God made me. I’m hoping that it will inspire other women to… Read more »

Andrea Lewis
Andrea Lewis
5 years ago
Reply to  Lauren

I would not spend a single cent visiting the DR. Those people are sick and twisted with self-hate and we, as proud Black people, need to disavow them completely.

IDGAF
IDGAF
5 years ago
Reply to  Andrea Lewis

you wont be missed… goto haiti try and void being kidnapped.. they call their dark skin kaka dyab or devils shit they see it ias a curse the mulatto elite 2% of pop holds all the power and riches and have real racism by exclusing blacks where DR wot exclude them they account for 85 percent of tourist workers and send that $ home dummy..my haitian pen pal that i buy art from got paaaaaiiiid because where did we go and spend a small fortune on haitian art? DR… without DR she wouldnt be able to send money to jacmel..… Read more »

Andrea Lewis
Andrea Lewis
5 years ago
Reply to  IDGAF

You need to learn to respect others’ innate right to have an opinion that differs from your own, or at least develop the ability to respond in a civilized manner. SMDH.
I sincerely hope you’re only like this online, where you can’t get your ass kicked.

BTW, my opinion remains unchanged. That is the problem with responding to strangers in an irrational and unnecessarily hostile manner. They don’t care what you think once you demonstrate you’re a boorish fool.

Annabella
Annabella
5 years ago
Reply to  Andrea Lewis

I agree. Their level of racism is way overboard. In solidarity, I feel African-Americans, should boycott Dominican businesses. Most of them do not like African-Americans anyway ‑only their money.
It would be interesting if Puerto Rico decided to apply those same “rules” to The Dominicans who over-populate the island.

Elizabeth
Elizabeth
6 years ago

I don’t beleive any “older lady tried to spit on you” perhaps she was a crazy lady, but in the other hand all that the article says is true. I’m part of that mayority of black women in a country where you’re not pretty if you have too much black characteristics, and be pretty means you have your hair straight.But things are changing in small steps and there are many women in DR that are going natural lately.I always like to see how black american women are considered pretty in the US and they are proud of their beauty (and… Read more »

Andrea Lewis
Andrea Lewis
5 years ago
Reply to  Elizabeth

Why would Lauren lie about an old woman trying to spit on her? They lynch Blacks in the DR. Why would spitting be so inconceivable????

Khairat Abdulrazzaq
Khairat Abdulrazzaq
5 years ago

i reside in Nigeria,west Africa,Even here we have a big problem.you rarely see a woman with natural hair.Out of 20 women,not even one will have natural hair.Internalised racism is part of society.The only way we can change it is by teaching our children to love themselves.I am 15 years old and I have been natural for only over a year.Even my mother calls my hair “uncivilised”

Hannah O
Hannah O
5 years ago

True. Even check out Nollywood movies, the only time a person would have natural hair is to signify poverty.

Khairat Abdulrazzaq
Khairat Abdulrazzaq
5 years ago
Reply to  Hannah O

My mother refuses to let me wear my natural hair out because It is “uncivilised”

Kay
Kay
5 years ago

From my personal family history, I know the complex relationship between black Haitians and Dominicans in the Caribbean. My great grandmother (dad’s mom) was a Dominican woman who was almost beaten to death for marrying a Haitian man. She fled to Haiti for her safety. Learning this true story as I grew up made me resent the “Dominican” within me for practically my entire life. I would scowl and roll my eyes as my mother told me “you look like a morena”. I went so far as refusing to learn Spanish after French, a custom in my dad’s side of… Read more »

Andrea Lewis
Andrea Lewis
5 years ago

Maybe they should. Maybe the United States should start deporting them also. I won’t miss them.

Umma Muslin
Umma Muslin
4 years ago

Wow. I thank God that I put my time into studying his word and learning about his begotten son. Thank you Jesus that I do not spend my time with these vain babblings and genealogy about ancestory, hair texture and skin color. That’s a sad place to be

trackback

[…] en République Dominicaine, ou dans d’autres pays d’Amérique Latine, on accorde beaucoup d’importance à la coiffure au point que certaines femmes se sentent obligées d’avoir les cheveux lisses pour décrocher un […]

Zaidi
Zaidi
4 years ago

Not surprising, given that the Dominican Republic is made up of many self-hating people who think they have more in common with White Spaniards than Mother Africa!! It’s their shame and disgrace!!!

...
...
4 years ago

It’s really heartbreaking to read stuff like this.

Nosharialawinamerica
Nosharialawinamerica
4 years ago

They’d don’t wanna be black then fuck them. They wont be accepted in no other race

Javon Armstrong
Javon Armstrong
3 years ago

I have family members from the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico and I honestly do not identify as 100 % black. Reason being, my great granddad (mom’s side) was white Purtuguese and My granddad (dad’s side) was East Indian (not native american or taino) and so my hair is jet black and shiny with loose curls, i have a straight nose that most people label as a “white-ppl nose” and I am accepted into the Dominican community. However I am not prejudiced against true black ppl. Most ppl in the Caribbean tend to stay far away from Haitians, not because they… Read more »

rah
rah
3 years ago

Javon, you don’t think Christianity with all its pilfering, genocide, rape and destruction of entire societies is a form of dark magic?? Specifically, the kind that was done on your ancestors who were conquered???

EbonyLolita
EbonyLolita
5 years ago

I’m in agreement with what most ppl have to say about the Dominican Republic. My father is Haitian so I am fully aware of the ethnic cleansing and GENOCIDE that is taking place against Haitians in DR presently. Now my focus is I think it’s time for Blacks to STOP wasting time worrying about what white or ppl who want to be white think of us. We know it and have always know it. We need to focus on changing the narrative where we fill ourselves with LOVE for SELF in the images of our ancestors. We must support other… Read more »

African-American
African-American
5 years ago

Black people in different parts of the world go through all forms of prejudice. Willie Lynch, did an intetesting job at brainwashing African slaves. As an African-American woman from the south, I was teased for being light skinned with curly hair by other blacks in the 90’s. It is hurtful to see such seperation between those that look like you and those that share the same history. We come from strong people that survived the middle passage, and slavey. We got to love who we are, and respect our history, that so many people would rather it be forgotten. Hotep!

IDGAF
IDGAF
5 years ago

as a person of color to use miami herald artiles with an agenda is dead wrong.. you just hate dr women say that instead of lying.. we arent racist.. and you have issues here with colorism and how everyone is a cherokee or creole or white grandma etc.. you choose to single out DR like its a trend yet puerto rico cuba Brazil are even more virulently racist and get no negative press… amerians have lght vs dark issues and i have dealt with black ppl who harbor seriously vile putrid comments about darker skin, about africans and about 4… Read more »

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